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The 

Confederate Veteran 

Magazine 

1893 



BROADFOOTS BOOKMARK 

ROUTE 3, BOX 318 
WENDELL, N. C. 27591 



Qopfederat^ l/eterap. 

Published Monthly in the Interest of Confederate Veterans and Kindred Topics. 



E-J5B 

1813 



Prick 5 Cents. ) 
Yearly Hi Cents, i 



Vol. I. Nashville, Tenn., January, 1893. 



No. 1. 



I S. A. ITNNINUHAM, 
I Editor and Manager. 



Application made for entry at the Post-office at Nashville as 
Mecond-dass Matter. 

Special club rates to the Press and to Camps— 25 copies 810. 

An extra copy sen! to each person who sends six subscriptions. 

Advertisements: Ten cents u line, 87.. 50 a column, $20 a page. Ills- 
count : Half year, one-eighth ; one year, one-fourtli. 



The Confederate Veteran greets you! It is not 
sent t<> any one at random, but addresses you through 
friendship, personal obligation, or because you have 
been commended as one who might take an active in- 
terest in the cause for which it is published. 

Please read it carefully. Although the first issue 
lias been edited from a sick. room, and there is defect 
in the arrangement, you will find its contents useful 
and interesting. Read every article. 

Please consider this: If each person addressed 
would send two subscriptions «ith SI, the publication 
would lie assured as a perpetuity. (ret a friend to 
join yon in it, please. If you cannot send a single 
subscription, please read it carefully and persuade 
others, as you think it deserving. 

The Confederate Veteran is intended as an or- 
gan of communication between Confederate soldiers 
and those who are interested in them and their 
affairs, and its purpose is to furnish a volume of in- 
formation which will he acceptable to the public, even 
to those who fought on the other side. It will at once 
he sent to every Confederate Veteran organization in 
existence and the patronage of such bodies is earnest- 
ly sought. 

The commendation of the Confederate Veteran 
from extremes of the South and from our friends at 
the North gives an immediate promise of usefulness 
and influence which should enlist the pride of every 
Southerner and the respect of all others. 

It is designed to publish advertisements in the Co\- 
kedrate Vkteran, but the illness referred to prevent- 
ed that feature in this issue. No other publication of 
equal circulation is as good a medium for notice of 
Southern literature. The next issue will contain a 
list of books as premiums. 

Whatever may he desirable to put before representa- 
tive people of the entire South and Southerner else- 
where may be printed advantageously in the Confed- 
erate Veteran. Put the thought in your pipe and 
sm,oke it. Smokers read the Confederate Veteran. 
A hint to the wise! 



The next issue may be expected earlier in the month 
February). 

('apt. R. E. Park, of Macon, in sending subscription 

says: "I wish you success in your enterprise, and 
stand ready to help you in any way that I call." 



Mrs. Alice Tri'eheart Buck, who is spending the 

winter in Washington, is zealous for the Confederate 
Veteran, and offers to be agent and correspondent 

gratis. 

Dr. .1. Wm. .b.NKs. Atlanta: "The prospectus is all 

right unless, indeed, it is too modest. Put me down 
as a subscriber and count on me to do all in my power 
to promote its circulation. I'll write for you occa- 
sionally.'' 

Monroe Park, the place selected by a committee of 
1'nited Confederate Veterans, is a very happy one. It 
is about a mile west from the old Confederate capitnl, 
and promises ere long to be a very central point 
Now the entire Southern people are to build ibis mon- 
ument. Who will be slow to do his part? 

The ohl South, published at Coleman, Texas, has a 
very kind article in behalf of the Confederate Vet- 
eran, which concludes as follows: "We expect that 
every Confederate and every son of a Confederate will 
become a subscriber at least to the CONFEDERATE 
Veteran. They can use their judgment about the 
Old Smith." 

HKAD<iCAHIKRs I'mTKJ) CONFEDERATE VETERANS 

New Orleans, La., September 20, 1892. 
<S". A. Cunningham, d'eneml AgenJ. Jefferzon Dari* Monnmenl Fund, 
Nanhmlle, Tain.: 

Your prospectus of the Confederate Veteran, to 
be published monthly "in the interest of the Davis 
Monument Fund and Veterans in general," promises 
to supply a very useful place. It will enable the 
Southern people to see from what sections the money 
is given, and also by whom. It will enable Veteran 
organizations to know of each other, whether of the 
l T .' C. V. organization or not, and it will create re- 
newed zeal generally in behalf of those who stood to- 
gether throughout the South's great struggle for sepa- 
rate independence. It will give me pleasure to supply 
you with data from this office as frequently as desired. 

George Moorman, 

Adjutant- Qrnerat and Chief of Staff. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



HONOR FOR TIIK SOUTH. 



AI.I. THE PEOPLE TO MILD A MONUMENT TN HONOR 
v DA Via AND Ills FELLOW 
CONJ E DERATES. 



The impulse to build to Jefferson Davis a monu- 
ment, iypical of the South in the war, was bo univer- 
sal when the great hero died that a general agreement 
was had in a few hours by telegraph. The movement 
was inaugurated by the Southern Press Association, 
and it is co-operated in by Confederate veterans every- 
where. The Jefferson Davis Monument Association 
at Richmond, chartered under the law? of Virginia, 
has special charge of the worjc. The active co-opera- 
tion of every newspaper and periodical in the South 
is sought in behalf of this Fund. It is very desirable 
to procure name and postofnce of every contributor of 
81 or more. 

Let every Southerner and friend of his people look 
at the situation, and he or she will want to do some- 
thing. In our National Capital there is an equestrian 
bronze statue at nearly every turn, to some hero of 
the war, but none of them are for our side. Proud 
patriots want for this final tribute not less than $250,- 
000. Twice as much has been raised-at the North for 
one individual monument. Shall we stop short of 
half as much for one symbolic of our cause ? 

Here are a few extracts from the thousands that 
have been published: 

R. M. Johnson, editor Houston Daily Post, Houston, 
Texas, says : " I will give the matter attention at 
once, and will aid the movement in every way in my 
power." 

I A. Read, editor Times, Lewisville, Texas, says: 
" I am fully in accord with the movement and will 
give the matter prominence in the Times. It will af- 
ford me pleasure to help the cadse all I possibly can." 

" Mr. Davis deserves a monument, as lasting as our 
native hills, for the splendid record he made in the 
cause of liberty. As an exemplar his character should 
be held up to the youth of the country; as an embodi- 
ment of everything good in human nature." 

An ex-Union soldier, a popular humorist and lec- 
turer, volunteered to "give a night anywhere at any 
time for Jeff Davis," and added: "Think of that 
man's integrity, of what he accomplished with the re- 
sources at hand — he was an American 1" 

A beautiful sensation occurred at a reunion of the 
ex-Confederates of Tennessee at Winchester, Gen. 
G. W. Gordon, of Memphis, in an oration said : 

" There is one whom we would remember to-day. 
We cannot forget him who has left to his countrymen 
and to posterity one of the noblest examples un- 
faltering devotion to truth and principle of which the 
political history of the human race gives an account ; 
one who presented in his own person a sublime in- 
stance of an unmurmuring and heroic endurance of 
unmerited suffering. When feeble, sick and helpless, 
and in prison indignities and chains were added. He 
loved the people of the South, and was true to them 



t" the last. And I trust they will erect a monument 
tn his memory so magnificent and imposing that it will 
have no equal upon the vast shuns of America — a 
monument that will tell the world that lie was a 
patriot ami that the cause for which we fought and our 
comrades died was constitutional, right and just. 
Then let the monument he built. Ami let it be built 
with a munificence ami magnificence commensurate 
with the fame and fidelity of the man and the grandeur 
of the principle it is intended to commemorate." 

J/ust here Chief Justice Turney handed him this 
letter from a venerable lady seventy-eight years old, 
who was the architect of her own fortune and is dis- 
pensing it with Christian zeal: 
S. A. Cunningham : 

Seeing from the papers that you have been appoint- 
ed bv the committee to collect funds for our beloved 
and honored Confederate President, Jefferson Davis, I 
desire to offer you the small sum of 85(H)— the widow's 
mite. I had the pleasure of entertaining him and 
his wife at my home in Havana, Cuba, soon after his 
release. To Mr. Davis, one of the brightest intellects 
of his time, the truest and most honorable of men, 
who sacrificed everything for the South and those he 
loved, I hope every man, woman and child will do all 
they can to raise the highest and grandest monument 
ever built to mortal man. Resp'y, S. E. Brewer. 

The committee appointed by Gen. J. B. Gordon, of 
Georgia, Commander of the United Confederate Vet- 
erans, of one from each state, met in Richmond, Sept. 
'92, by direction of the Chairman, Gen. W. L. Cabell, 
of Texas, to consider the location, cost of construction, 
plans, etc., for the Davis Memorial. Richmond Asso- 
ciation participated in the proceedings by invitation. 
The general purpose was set forth by the Chairman 
and a series of resolutions were adopted : 

They were that "as Richmond was the capital of 
the Confederacy, and has been selected by Mrs. Jeffer- 
son Davis as the burial place of her husband, it is re- 
garded the most appropriate place for the erection of a 
monument to his memory. The United Confederate 
Veterans will co-operate with the Davis Monument 
Association of Richmond and the Southern Press As- 
sociation in its efforts to erect the same." 

Also, that State organizations be formed, and " that 
the Chairman appoint for each Southern State and for 
the Indian Territory a sub-committee of five members, 
each of which shall have within its territory the 
entire control and supervision of all matters pertain- 
ing- to this sacred object, including the collection of 
funds by popular subscription, and shall have 
authority to name a suitable and responsible person 
as Treasurer, to receive the same and forward quarter- 
ly to the Treasurer of the Richmond Association." 

Monroe Park was selected for the location of the 
monument, It was resolved^ too, that the character, 
probable] cost and plans be determined by the Rich- 
mond Association, and as soon as a sufficient amount 
of money is in hand to justify it, the work of erecting 
the monument be commenced. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



In an address to the Southern people, the 
committee has ratified the preference expressed by 
Mrs. Davis for Richmond, Va., as the proper site for 
such memorial. It has determined that not les.» than 
$250,000 shall be raised for that purpose, and that 
there shall be an organization in every state in the 
South, through which the offerings of the people may 
flow to the accomplishment of this patriotic and pious 
work. Continuing its appeal the committee say: 

"This money will be raised speedily. This monu- 
ment will rise, and soon, to • be an everlasting 
memorial, not only to the patriot and statesman who 
purely and bravely led your fortunes in the times that 
wrung your souls, but of the ineffable valor and 
devotion of the must heroic soldiery which the world 
ever saw, whom he typified while he commanded. 

No other hands than ours can be relied dpon to put 
stones upon this pile. Our own hard-earned mite 
must mainly accomplish its rearing. Our own sweal 
must chiefly stream upon its uplilting. 

[f our poverty has been and continues to be great, 
it has at least made us rich in love for each other, [f 

Oltr lives have I u one. long tale wf sacrifice, and 

threaten more, t hi' most willing of those to come must 
be that one which will keep green forever the memo- 
ries nf our loved land ami of our" dead brothers, 

Love and self-sacrifice build more monuments than 
money ever did or ever will, and we now gladly and 
confidently bid you to illustrate it. The men and the 
women who fought for the Confederacy and their de- 
scendants, must quarry this monument out of their 
heart's blood if need be. It were I >cst in every casi 
that they should. There is nol a discordant element 
anywhere. Let us all be at work ! 

All remittances for this purpose should be made to 
John 8. Ellett, President of the State Hank at Rich- 
mond, Ya., who is the bonded Treasurer of the gen- 
eral organization." 



STORY OF AX EPITAPH. 



THE KIND OF MEMORIAL. 



Various opinions prevail about the kind of structure 
to be reared. Some want a shaft with Mr. Davis on 
horseback, others want groups of figures in a temple, 
etc. In his oration before the United Confederate 
Veterans at their last reunion. New Orleans, Senator 
John W. Daniel, of Virginia, said : 

"Let there be reared no unmeaning shaft, but a tem- 
ple, in which his own figure shall be the central 
object, and around which shall be grouped the heroic 
relics of the battles of the Confederacy, and the 
pictured faces and the sculptured forms of the great 
and true and brave men who fought them. I hope to 
see the movement grow until the temple shall stand 
— the Battle Abbey of the South — the undying me- 
morial of the people who fought their own battles in 
their own way, for their own liberty as they conceived 
it, for their own ^dependence as they desired it, and 
who need give to the world no other reason -why." 



Soon after the fall of Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston 
at the battle of Shiloh,and the transfer of his remains 
to New Orleans, a lady visiting the cemetery found 
pinned to a rough board that rested on the temporary 
tomb the following beautiful epitaph. It was written 
in a delicate hand with a pencil, and the rain had 
nearly obliterated the characters, but she made a 
vVrbatim copy of the manuscript and sent it to one of 
the New Orleans papers with the request that if pos- 
sible the name of the author should be published. 
This was gladly done, and the exquisite lines went 
the round.- of the press of this country and England 
as a model of English composition. Lord Palmerston 
pronounced it "a modern classic, 'Ciceronian in its 
language." Public curiosity being aroused, the auth- 
orship was traced to John Dimitry, a young native of 
New Orleans, and a son of Alexander Dimitry, who 
before the war occupied a distinguished position in 
the State Department at Washington. Young Dim- 
itry, though only a boy. served in Johnston's army 
at Shiloh, and on visiting New Orleans and the 
grave of his dead chieftain wrote the lines on the in- 
spiration of the moment and modestly pinned them 
on the headboard as the only tribute he could offer. 
When the question arose concerning the 'form of epi- 
taph to be placed on the monument erected to the 
memory of the dead Confederate General the com- 
mittee of citizens in charge with one voice decided 
upon this, and it is now inscribed upon the broad 
panel at the base of the statue. — Exchange. 

IN MEMORY. 

Beyond Oils stone is laid, 

I or a season, 

Albert Sidney .Johnston, 

A(ieniral in ih*> Army of the Confederate States, 

Who fell Hi shiloh. Tennessee, 

I in the sixth daj of April, A. D., 

Eighteen hundred and sixty. two; 

A man tried in many high offices 

And critical enterprise. 

And found faithful In all. 

His life was one long sacrifice of Interest to conscience ; 

And even that life, on a woeful Sabbath, 

Did he yield as a hol<>cauBt at his country '6 need. 

Not wholly understood was he while he lived ; 

But, In his death, his greatness stands confessed In a people's tears 

Resolute, moderate, clear of envy yet not wanting 

In that finer ambition which makes men great and pure. 

In his honor — Impregnable; 

In his simplicity— sublime. 

No country e'er had a truer son— no cause a nobler champion • 

No people a bolder defender— no principle a purer victim 

Than the dead soldier 

Who sleeps here. 

The cause for which he perished Is lost — 

The people for whom he fought are crushed — 

The hopes In which he trusted are shattered— 

The flag he loved guides no more the charging lines, 

But bis fame, consigned to the keeping of that time, which. 

Happily, Is not so much the tomb of virtue as Its shrine, 

Shall, In the years to come, Are modest worth to noble ends. 

In honor, now, our great captain rests; 

A bereaved people rnoucn him, 

Three commonwealths proudly claim him 

And history shall cherish him 

Among those choicer spirits who, holding their conscience unmlx'd 

with blame, 

Have been, In all conjectures, true to themselves, their country 

and their God. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 




JEFFERSON DAVIS AT EIGHTY. 

Jkkkkikon Davis was born in 1808, and lived 81 years. 
His birth place was in a broad, low house at Fairview, 

a small village in Christian— now Todd — County, 
Kentucky. He visited the place in 1886 and partici- 
pated in the dedication of a pretty brick Baptist 
church, that had been erected on the site of the old 
house. There was a largo gathering of people from 
the neighborhood, while others had gone many miles 
through excessive rain. It was a most disagreeable 
day. As the venerable gentleman stood in the midst 
of the congregation, whose happy faces are indelibly 
impressed upon the mind of the writer, he used this 
language: " Many of you may think strangely of my 
participation in this service, not being a Baptist. My 
father was a Baptist, and a better man." 

In her Memoirs of Jefferson Davis his wife copied 
just as he furnished them to a stenographer, facts 
about his family and his own career, points of which 
are embodied in this little sketch. 

Three brothers came from Wales in the early part 
of the Eighteenth Century and settled in Philadelphia. 
The youngest, Evan Davis, subsequently removed to 
Georgia, then a colony of Great Britain. He was the 



grandfather of Jefferson Davis. The father, Samuel 
Davis, had moved from Augusta, Ga., to Southwest- 
ern Kentucky, and resided at Fairview when Jeffer- 
son, the tenth and last child, was horn. 

Samuel Davis had entered the army of the Revo- 
lution at the age of sixteen, with two half brothers 
named Williams, and while a boy soldier, met the 
beautiful Jane Cook in South Carolina, who became 
his wife anil the mother of Jefferson Davis. In his in- 
fancy the family moved to Louisiana, but ill health 
induced their return to Wilkinson County, Miss. 
Three of his brothers we're in the War of 1812, and the 
fourth volunteered, but " was drafted to stay at home." 
The Mississippi home of Samuel Davis was rather on a 
divide, whereby to the west on rich land were Vir- 
ginians, Kentuekians and Tennesseans, and to the 
east on inferior soil were South Carolinians and 
Georgians. The settlements were sparse, however, for 
Mississippi was then of the territory ceded by Geergia 
to the United States, and there were but few schools. 
At the age of seven Jefferson Davis was sent on horse- 
back through the " wilderness" to a Catholic school 
in Washington County, Kentucky. He journeyed 
with Maj. Hinds, who commanded the Mississippi 
Dragoons in the battle of New Orleans, and his 
family. On reaching Nashville they went to the Her- 
mitage for a visit to Gen. Jackson. In the reminis- 
cences Mr. Davis dwells upon that prolonged visit of 
several weeks and upon his "opportunity to observe a 
great man," and he had always remembered "with 
warm affection the kind and tender wife who presided 
over his house." Gen. Jackson then lived in " a roomy 
log house, with a grove of fine forest trees in its front." 
In that Catholic school- for a time young Davis was 
the only Protestant boy and he was the smallest. He 
was very much favored and roomed with the priest. 
One night he was fjersuaded by some associates to 
blow out the light in the reverend father's room that 
they might do some mischief, which they did in a 
hurry. He was interrogated severo'y, but said he 
" didn't know much, and wouldn't tell that." Finally 
he agreed to tell a little about it on condition that he 
be given his liberty. That little was that he blew out 
the candle. After two years steamboats had been 
put on the river, and by a steamer the lad returned 
home from Louisville. 

Conforming to a plan proposed by his brother, who 
went after him, the happy lad,- with throbbing heart, 
approached his dear old mother and asked if she had 
seen any stray horses round there. She had seen a 
"stray boy," and clasped him to her arms. He ran to 
the field where he found his father, who took him in 
his arms with much emotion and kissed him. 

Young Davis went afterward to neighborhood schools, 
which were very poor, but one Mr. Shaw, from Boston, 
advanced him more than any other teacher he ever 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



had. Shaw married in Mississippi, and lie preached 
•while teaching. 

Jefferson Davis was sent again to Kentucky, and 
placed at the Transylvania University, near Lexing- 
ton. Afterward he was one of six United States Sen- 
ators who were fellow-students at that University. At 
the early age of fifteen he was given a cadetship at 
West Point, 

Here is a literal extract from his dictation : " When I 
entered the United Suites Military Academy, that 
truly great and good man, Albert Sidney Johnston, 
had preceded me from Transylvania. K\ .. :ni incident 
•which formed a link between us, and inaugurated a 
friendship which grew as years rolled by, strengthened 
by after associations in the army, and which remains 
to me yet, a memory of one of the greatest and best 
characters! have ever known. 1 lis particular friend 
was Leonidas Polk." 

Mr. Davis then gives an account of Polk's religious 
convictions, and of his joining the church. It is 
known that he afterward was a Bishop in the Episco- 
pal Church. I'olk was a Lieutenant General, in the 
Western Army with Gen. Jos. E. Johnston, whom he 
confirmed into church membership only a few weeks 
before he was killed by a cannon shot from the enemy. 
The dictation ended too early. In referring to it, he 
said to his wife, " I have not told what I wish to say 
of Sidney Johnston and Polk. I] have much more to 
say of" them." 

The history starts on from the dictation in a manner 
worthy the distinguished wife. 

Our people generally know quite well how meanly 
the publishers treated the author in regard to the roy- 
alty on her hook, and that she succeeded in stopping 
its sale when they owed her a little more than 
$4,000. When legal technicalities arc removed, and 
she can procure what is due her on sales, there will no 
doubt be many orders given for the work, both he 
cause of its merits and the wish to show an apprecia- 
tion 01 her noble service in its presentation. 



FROM TWO TRIBUTES TO MR. DAVIS. 

In one of the successful entertainments given at 
Nashville for the benefit of the monument fund, there 
were two short addresses, from which the following is 
taken. Col. H. M. Doak, the first speaker, said : 

"Jefferson Davis built his own monument firmly in 
the history of his country — a heritage for the world. 
It rises, firm and true, out of his struggles as a typical 
American youth; out of his service to his country on 
the fields of Mexico; out of his planter's life, adorned 
by domestic love and the affection and confidence of 
neighbors and slaves; out of his earnest, stormy po- 
litical struggles; out of his able organization and sup- 
port of the American military system, as Secretary of 
War, and as a statesman ; out of his far-sighted pro- 
jection of a transcontinental railway; out of his long 
•and able career as a statesman; out of his faithful 
struggle to preserve the Union as it was, and out of his 



sad out resolute departure to enter upon inevitable 
civil strife; out of his able civil administration as 
President ; out of his capable preparation for and con- 
duct of war; out. of his clear and able State papers; 
out of his unfaltering devotion to civil liberty, in the 
midst of arms, when laws arc silent; out of his pres- 
ervation of the forms and spirit of civil government, 
when the military necessity for a dictator must have 
tempted him strongly to sweep aside all that stood in 
the way of the military arm; out of his stubborn en- 
durance in war: out of the ignominy of unjust chains 
.mil prison; out of bis long and dignified endurance 
of obloquy; out of his life as a man and a citizen, a 
neighbor, husband and father; out of his quiet but 
able part in church and business assemblies, when he 
was denied all part in political affairs. Out of tie 

iditions of his busy life rises the monument he 
builded— more enduring than bronze or marble. To 
ourselves we owe it to build a material monument 
symbolic of these virtues." 

Mi Arthur H. Marks, of Winchester, gifted, and of 
great literary promise, but who has since died — he 
was the son of the late ex-Governor Marks — said; 

"Jefferson Davis was the man not only of his gen- 
eration, but of his day. His unique personality would 
have fitted nowhereelse. Hisdestiny was as broad as 
his country, and there was no other gap of American 
history wide enough to receive it. To us, as to all the 
world, be -till stands for the Confederacy. He was 
covered with it. Between the dates of his birth and 
death was written all of that stormy chapter. In the 
name of Jefferson Davis we must raise a monument 
to the (»1,1 South, for in his long career the glory of 
that Old South lies like a sword within its scabbard, 
Me losed from hilt to tip with years of precious service. 
To you < 'onfedi rate veteran- Jefferson Davis is a mem- 
ory, but to the young men of the South he is an in- 
spiration. For you lie revives the past, but for us he 
animates the future. To you be is a majestic figure of 
battle smoke looming up in the haze and distance of a 
generation ago, Hut to US be i< a living presence, an 
example of a man striding on before all of our ambi- 
tions, showing us by his knightly footsteps where we 
should tread." 

A CHRISTIAS'S NEW YEAR C/REETTM!. 



To My Dear Aunt, S. E. B.: 
Again the clock of time doth strike, 'tis eighteen ninety-three; 
Again the love-chords of my heart, dear aunt, I'll tune for thee. 
Our Father in His wisdom hath kindly shut from view 
All t lint the coming future shall bring to me and you; 
But may His richest blessings be sent thy heart to cheer, 
And may no bitter sorrow becloud thy glad new year. 
The angels sang a chorus of " peace on earth, good will ;" 
May the spirit of that anthem our hearts forever nil I 
Again, the loving words, " I'll not leave thee, nor forsake," 
Inspires our fainting energies, and we fresh courage take. 
Thus on and on we Journey, »tlll trusting In His word, 
Walllngstlll and watching for the coming of our Lord. 
With the rapids almost past, we can see within the veil— 
Our God doth hold the rudder, and safe will be our sail ; 
And when wc reach the haven we'll lay our burden down, 
And with the many ransomed receive the promised crown. 
Jacksonville, Ala., Jan. 1, 1898. Mabt D. C. 

The recipient of the above stands first in practical 
advancement of the Monument cause. 



Please supply information to this journal about con- 
tributors to Confederate Homes or Monuments. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



FAVORS RECEIVED AND VI. 77 77".V> REVISED. 



Public and grateful acknowledgment is made for 
favors from many railroad and navigation corpora- 
tions. In the list i- the Atlantic Coast Line, the Rich- 
mond A: 1 tanville Railroad ( lompany, ( reorgia Railroad 
Company, Central Railroad Company of Georgia, At- 
lanta & Florida Railroad, Savannah. Americus & 
Montgomery Railroad, Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Mem- 
phis Railroad. St. Louis & Southwestern Railroad. 
East 4 West Railroad of Alabama, Knoxville, Cum- 
berland Gap & Louisville Railroad, Rome Railroad, 
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, Missouri Pa- 
cific Railroad. Louisville, New Orleans & Texas. Ten- 
nessee Midland, the Texas Pacific Railway, Evansville 
& Tern- Haute Railroad. St. Louis & Tennessee River 
Packet Company, Nashville. Paducah & Cairo Packet 
I -in]. any. Nashville & Evansville Packet Company, 
the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad, and 
the Louisville & Nashville Railroad gave liberal aid 
to some profitable entertainments. 

Nearly all the foregoing companies have been un- 
stinted in furnishing transportation, and in addition 
to this, acknowledgment is made to many other rail- 
road- for transportation on application. 

In this connection report is made to the Southern 
Press Association and to the public, that application 
was made to the Pullman Palace Car Company, with 
n quest for favor, and a special visit was made to Chi- 
cago, with strong letter of introduction to Vice Presi- 
dent Wickes, and credentials of which any man might 
be proud. Maj. Wickes was absent, and at the sugges- 
tion of his clerk, request was made of Superintendent 
Garcelon. After waiting more than half an hour on 
one clerk and another, I was finally told that I could 
not see Mr. Garcelon. I then made request of him 
for trip pass from there to Dallas, and was refused. 
In subsequent correspondence with Vice President 
Wi«kes, I explained to him that the Pullman Com- 
pany had not done its share towards the press with 
the railroad companies, and that I made earnest plea 
for favor, representing the newspapers of the South 
and the Southern people generally, in behalf of the 
cause that was dear to them all, and insisted upon 
his granting the request, but no concession was 
made. 

Seeing that the Pullman company did more than 
ten millions of dollars of business last year, with a 
large proportion in the South, and on learning that 
its President, Mr. Pullman, contributed more than 
$75,000 to the last Republican campaign fund, and 
early after the election he was in conference to con- 
sider what further might be done for the benefit of 
his party, it occurred to me that his subordinates may 
have known well enough that no concession in the 
direction of my plea would be tolerated. 



REUNION ov BAUSON'S KV.XTVCKY BRIGADE. 

Col. \V. 1. Clarke, of. the famous Orphan Brigade,. 
who now resides in Nashville, attended its last re- 
union at Paris. a nd was one of the speakers. After 
words of greeting that thrilled the many thousands 
pr< -cut. li>- -aid: 

I am not here to indulge in sentiment— although 
the sentiment allied to the service of these old gray- 
haired and battle-scarred veterans is deep enough and 
broad enough to justly merit the poetic strains of a 
Father Ryan, as lie mused of them in years gone by, 
or of the outbursts of praise of their virtues, as they 
have gone forth in melodious rapture from the almost 
hallowed lips of our idolized women of the South. 
We are here to-day as. surviving members of that 
heroic old brigade, whose deeds of prowess will adorn 
the brightest pages, when passion shall have subsided, 
and impartial history be recorded. We arc here as 
living exponents of the greatest truth ever contended 
for by brave and self-sacrificing spirits. 

More than a quarter of a century has passed, since 
by the arbitrament of war we sheathed our swords 
and laid down our arms. Not, however, with spirits 
crushed and characters gone. Conscience told us with 
unmistakable emphasis that we were right — and he 
who is right is true and brave. 

We accepted the decrees of war. Lost fortunes had to 
be recuperated ami prospects all blasted re-established. 

This was hard indeed, but remembering our Loved 
ones, we brought into requisition the same persistency 
of purpose, the same energy of will, and the same old 
redoubtable spirit, that characterized us in days of 
horrid war — never forgetting for a moment tha,t the 
sacrifices, denials and anxiety, made and shown for 
us, by our much loved ones, demanded this labor of 
love that the brave only can truly appreciate. 

How well we have succeeded is evidenced by the 
benignant smiles of Providence that have attended 
lis. But seldom do you hear of a worthless, improvi- 
dent, returned Confederate, especially a follower of 
the fortunes of this old brigade. ***** 
God helping us we will never, by word, deed or 
thought, make explanation of our conduct that would 
compromise our lofty standard of honor and right — 
bring reproach upon the memory of our fallen heroee 
— or endeavor by canting words of a cringing suppli- 
ant to ingratiate ourselves with those who did not 
have the moral or physical courage to go out and bat- 
tle for principle and truth, or whose conceptions of 
right and wrong were of such a nature as to prefer ig- 
nominious submission to a manly strife for the 
glorious blessings of civil liberty. 

All honor to the brave men who fought us — who 
were honest in their convictions and sincere in their 
actions. They have no respect or toleration for such 
a miserable apologist. Therefore, with no apologies 
to make, no excuses to offer, we will go along with 
our heads up during the remainder of our days, with 
the proud consciousness of having done our duty, 
cherishing the memory of our lamented and mucn- 
loved heroes who fell by our side on the crimson field 
of battle or who have since left us and are now in the last 
sweet embrace of sleep, while we indulge in the blessed 
assurance of hope that it may be ours to meet them 
in the blissful realms above. * * If I had nothing 
else to bequeath my children, my service and conneo-, 
tion with this old brigade would be a sufficient heritage. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



CONFEDERATE MONUMENTS. 



RECORD AS PROCURED IN REGARD TO THE- MONU- 
MENTS ERECTED AND UNDER WAY. 



New Orleans has taken the lead. The following 
sketch of her monuments was kindly furnished by 
Mr. W. Miller Owen. He did not give the cost as pub- 
lished, but that was procured by a committee of gen- 
tlemen who were familiar with all the enterprises. 

The Confederate Monument in Greenwood Ceme- 
tery, built by the Ladies' Benevolent Association, is 
of white marble, surmounted by a figure of a Confed- 
erate infantryman "on guard." Around the pedestal 
are the busts of Lee. Sidney Johnston, Polk and 
"Stonewall." Under the mound on which it stands 
are vaults containing the remains of many Confed- 
erate soldiers. It was unveiled 1867. Value, $ 25,000. 

Monument of the Army of West Virginia. — A 
column 50 feet above the ground, or 38 feel above the > 
mound on which it stands. On the summit is a stone 
statue of Stonewall Jackson, 8 feet 9 inches high. 
Under the mound arc vaults for the dead Jefferson 
Davis' remains are dep tsited there at present. Un- 
veiled May, 1881. Value, $25,000. 

Monument of Washington Artillery.— Marble 
.shaft on mound, statue of an artilleryman on top, 
sponge staff in hand. On the base arc inscribed the 
names of those members of the command who were 
killed or died in service, also the names of sixty en- 
gagements in which the command participated. Un- 
veiled Feb. 22, 1880. Value, $15,000. 

Robert E. Lee Monument.— A Doric column of 
granite on a grassy mound, surmounted by bronze 
statue of Lee 15 feet high. Entire height, 106 feet 8 
inches. Column, GO feet. Unveiled Feb. 22, 1884. 
It is in St. Charles Street. Value, $40,000. 

Monument of Army of Tennessee. — Mound con- 
taining tombs for deceased members, surmounted by 
equestrian statue of Albert Sidney Johnston in bronze. 
At the entrance to vaults is a marble life-size figure of 
a Confederate Sergeant calling his roll. Value $35,000. 

Winchester. Va., has erected a $10,000 monument to 
the unknown Confederate dead in Stonewall Cem- 
etery. In addition to this principal monument, dif- 
ferent States have erected shafts. There is one for 
Virginia that cost $1,000. Maryland has a superb 
structure, capped with a statue of a private soldier, by 
O'Brien, that cost $2,500. The statue was made on 
an order that failed and the work was procured at a 
small percentage of* its value. 

Culpepper, Va., has a monument that cost $1,0* K). 
""Woodstock, Va : Subscriptions have been made 
in this county for the Lee monument at Richmond, 
Jackson, Lexington and elsewhere. 

A monument is being erected near Newport News, 
Va., to cost between one and two thousand dollars. It 
is the work of the Lee Camp of Confederate veterans 
and their friends at Hampton Va. 

Shepardstown, Va. : A Confederate monument has 
been erected at Shepardstown at a cost of $2,500. It 
is a marble shaft. 

The ex-Confederate Association of Grayson County, 
Texas, are preparing to erect on the public square at 
Shannon a $2,500 monument to the memory of Con- 
federate soldiers. 



Anderson, S. ('.: "Our noble women have organ- 
ized a Confederate Memorial Association and are now 
raising funds to erect a monument in our city." 

Newberry. S C: "Our ladies have erected a Con- 
federate monument on the public square which cost 
$1,300. It i.- of marble." 

Natchez, Miss.: "We have built a very handsome 
monument to our Confederate dead costing ¥^,<khi. It 
is a shaft with life-size soldier in marble. Statue 
made in Italy." 

The Ladies' Association of Montgomery, Ala., has 
well under way a monument on Capitol Hill, where 
the Confederate Government was first established. 
The monument is an imposing structure to cost 
S 4">.( w m>. About half of this money has already been 
expended. 

Richmond, Va., Dec. 30, 1892. 
Editor Confederate Veteran, Nashville, Turn.: 

My Di \i: Sir — At your request I enumerate, rely- 
ing on my memory alone for the facts and figures, the 

following Confederate M ui m inent s here : 

Monument to 12,000 Confederate dead in Hollywood 
Cemetery, a granite pyramid 45 feel square and 90 feet 

high, erected by the ladies of the Hollywood Memo- 
rial Association at a cost of about $50,000, now almost 
covered by" that beautiful evergreen vine, the Vii 
creeper. 

Monument to 17,000 Confederate dead in Oakwood 
Cemetery, a massive granite obelisk, erected by the 
ladie- of the Oakwood Memorial Association, at a cost 
of about $5,000. 

Monument to the Private Soldiers and Sailors of the 
Confederacy, in Marshall Park, overlooking the site of 
Libby Prison, a copy of Pompev's Pillar, surmounted 
by a heroic bronze figure of the Confederate Infantry- 
man, erected by private subscriptions at a cost of 
about $50,000. 

Bronze Equestrian Statue of Gen. R. E. Lee, by 
Mercie, ornamental granite pedestal, from designs by 
Pujot, at the western extremity of Franklin St., erected 
by private subscriptions at a cost of about $75,000. 

Heroic Statue, in bronze, of Gen. T. .T. Jackson, by 
Foley, presented by admiring Englishmen to the peo- 
ple of Virginia, erected in Capitol Square on a granite 
base, at the expense of the State. Aggregate cost, 
about $15,i hn i. 

Bronze Heroic Statue of Lieut. -Gen. A. P. Hill, by 
Sheppard, erected over Hill's remains on the Hermit- 
age Road just north of the city, by private subscrip- 
tions, at a cost of about $15,000. 

Bronze Heroic Statue of Gen. Wm. C. Wickham, 
by Valentine, provided by private subscription, and 
erected in Monroe Park on a granite base at the ex- 
pense of the city. Total cost, about $15,000. 

Collections of the Southern Historical Society, office 
in the State Capitol, R. A. Brock, Esq., Secretary, 
which cannot be valued by a standard of dollars and 
cents. 

Monuments over the grave of Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, 
in Hollywood Cemetery, to the dead of Pickett's Di- 
vision and the dead of Otey Battery — both on Gettys- 
burg Hill in Hollywood— and to the Richmond How- 
itzers, on Howitzer Place, just west of Monroe Park, 
represent an outlay of approximately $10,000. 

There may be others which I cannot at the moment 
recall. I think that three quarters of a million dol- 
lars in the aggregate will about represent the invest- 



8 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



ment in Confederate Memorials al present existing 
here. This includes the Confederate Home, Davis 

.Mansion. .etc 

"In addition to these, besides the great crowning 
monumental work in which you are so active, move- 
ments are well advanced for an Equestrian Statue of 

(Jen. .1. E. B. Stuart, and a monument to Gen. John 
R. Cooke." 

T!i.- ex-Confederate Association of Grayson County. 
Texas, are preparing to erect on tin public square at 
Sherman, a 82.5im> monument to the memory of ex- 
Confederate soldiers. 

A monument is being erected near Newport New6, 
Ya.. to cost from one to two thousand dollars, to It 
erected by tin Lee Camp of Hampton, Ya.. and three 

friends. 

Newberry, S. C. : "The ladies have erected a ruoi 
umenl to the Confederate dead from this county in 
the court house square. It is of marble, and costs 
11,300." 

Anderson, S: C: "Our noble women have organ- 
ized a Confederate Memorial Association, and are now 
raising funds to erect a monument in our city." 

A Confederate monument has been erected at 
Shcpardstown, Ya., a marble shaft to cost about $2,500. 

'I'hc people of Tipton Co. Tenn., are raising funds for 
county monument, and have contributed more than 
$50 to the Davis monument. 

A movement was started for a Confederate monu- 
ment at Fayetteville, Tenn., but it was abandoned on 
account of a disastrous cyclone which swept the town. 

All honor to our good women at Knoxville, Tenn., 
who organized a Memorial Association iti May, 1K68, 
and struggled on persistently, year after year, until 
they have secured one of the most beautiful monu- 
ments in the country. The monument is a graceful, 
well-proportioned shaft, twelve feet square at the base 
and twenty-four feet high. It is surmounted with a 
heroic statue of a private soldier, standing at parade 
rest. The inscription "Commemorates the heroic 
courage and unshaken constancy of more than l,(i(H) 
soldiers of the South, who, in the great war between 
the States, 1861 to 1865, were inspired by the holiness 
of a patriotic and impersonal love, and in the 
mountain passes of Tennessee, whether stricken in 
the field or in hospital ward, gave ungrudgingly their 
lives to their country." The monument is of Ten- 
nessee gray marble, and is extremely handsome foT 
the cost, 84,500. The unveiling was last Memorial 
day, May 10. Tho general address was by Senator W. 
B. Bate. ex-Union soldiers co-operated in making the 
event a success. The daily press, Republican and 
Democratic, gave very eulogistic accounts of the event. 
Many gentlemen were helpful to the ladies in their 
work, one of whom was Col. P. A. Moses, a member 
of the Da'vis Monument Committee for Tennessee. 

The Confederate monument in the grassy court- 
house yard at Bolivar, Tenn., is very beautiful. It cost 
$2,700, is of marble, about thirty feet high from 
ground to top, urn on top, shaft draped with flag. 
The ornaments are cannon, tents, drums, flags, etc. 
Inscription on south side, " To the Confederate dead 
of Hardeman County;" west, "Hardeman County 
erects this monument to the memory of her sons fallen 



in the service of the Confederate States; 1 ' east, "In 
hope of a joyful resurrection;" north, 

"Though men deserve. 

Th- \ inav not win BQOC686. 
The brave will honor the i>rave, 

\ anqutahed uonc the Laea." 

There is no place in Dixie where more credit is due 
for the Confederate cemetery and monument than 
Fredericksburg. The wifeofCapt. J. N. Barney, of 
that old town, who raised $5,100 for the Confederate 
cemetery, with which marble headstones replaced 
rotting wood, and a creditable statu, of a private sol- 
dier was placed in the center. In telling of the work she 
said: "I received several shower baths of cold water 
thrown on me by doubting people, who said the South 
wa.» too busy trying to make a living to attend to put- 
ting headstones to its dead soldiers, but I did not 
mind a word they said. First. I put a box on my hall 
table for the babies to drop pennies in. It was fine 
fun for the servants to make the little fat hands un- 
fold for the purpose. Then the children brought me 
the five-cent pieces; boys and girls on their way to 
school would contribute their money to put tomb- 
stones to the soldiers who died to save their homes. 
I succeeded in stirring my poor, little battle-scarred 
town until I secured $250 from voluntary contribu- 
tors. Then I branched off into all the States. Maj. 
Spurr, of Nashville, will tell you how I tormented his 
unfailing courtesy and patience. Simply by using my 
pen and bringing the matter to the hearts of the dear 
Southern people, I raised $5,100, and you saw the re- 
sult." In conclusion, she said: ."We must have that 
monument to Mr. Davis, and that shortly, while our 
generation lasts. It is due our Lost Cause that we 
should." 

Helena, Ark., has done herself credit in local mon- 
uments. Mrs. Paralee Haskell, Secretary of the Asso- 
ciation, writes: The main monument cost $4,500. 
The soldier is of fine Italian marble (through M. Mu'l- 
doon & Co., of Louisville), was sculptured in Italy and 
cost $1,000. The monument is worthy to commemo- 
rate our heroes. It was dedicated on May Jo last, with 
appropriate ceremonies, the orator of the day being 
Col John R. Fellows, of New York. Every dollar for 
the monument was paid before it was dedicated. Near 
by stands a monument erected a year previous to the 
memory of Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne. It is a shaft of 
white marble, 25 feet in height, with the following in- 
scription on the western side: 

PATRICK RoNAYNE CLEBURNE, 

Major-Oeneral of C. S. A., 

Born In County of Cork, Ireland, March 17, 182X. 

Killed at the Battle of Franklin, Tenn., 

November, 1864. 

On the north side the word "Chickamauga" and the 
Confederate seal, and the following words from the 
poem of Mrs. Virginia Frazer Boyle: 

A rift of light 
Revealed the horse and rider, then the scene was dim ; 

But on the Inner works the death hall 
Banc In Cleburne's ears a battle hymn. 

On the east side was the sunburst and the legend 
"Franklin." On the side facing the south was the 
harp of Erin entwined with the shamrock, below 
which was the stanza, " Memory ne'er will cease to 
cherish deeds of glory thou hast won." After appro- 
priately decorating the graves, Confederate and others, 
the spectators departed for the outgoing trains and 
boats, which bore away the various crowds who joined 
in commemorating and honoring the noble Confede- 
rate of rank and file. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



Jackson, Term., has erected a tall shaft 70 feet high, 
including the figure of a Confederate soldier at parade 
rest. It is in the court-house yard. 

Hon. D. N. Kennedy, of Clarksville, kindly fur- 
nishes us the following data about a monument in 
course of erection there: It is to be 48 feet high, 9 
feet by 13 feet at base; will be capped by a bronze 
statue" 9 feet high. There will be two granite statues 
7 feet high, 12 feet above the base. The monument is 
being constructed from Barre granite. It is to cost 
$7,500, and to be completed in the early spring, and to 
be dedicated in May. In a strong speech for that 
movement at the last Confederate reunion there Mr. 
Kennedy made the effective point that he would not 
be willing to omit having a part in it. [It is a fact 
worthy of note that Mr. Kennedy is president of the 
oldest bank in Tennessee. It was established in 1854 
and never suspended, not even during the war. He 
and the vice president, Mr. .James I,. Glenn, have 
ever been associated in the institution.] 

Savannah, Ga., has a Confederate monument that 
would be a credit to any city and to any cause. An 
extended description of it may be expected in our 
next issue. The cost was about $35 ,( * * ' 

The greatest monument to a Confederate that has 
ever been erected, size and quality of material con- 
sidered, is the Lee monument in Richmond. .In the 
reference to it elsewhere no idea of its magnitude i ail 
be had except that it cost 175.000. A more accurate 
description may be expected hereafter. 

.Macon, Ga., has a superb Confederate monument in 
the most prominent street crossing in the city. It is 
of very white Italian marble, is 37 reel high, 'including 
the statue of a private soldier, 10 feet 6 inches. The 
base is of (Georgia) Stone Mountain granite. The in- 
scriptions: Great seal of the Confederacy, by copy 
belonging to Charles Herbst, a Kentuckian, but " resi- 
dent of Macon almost long enough to be a native,'' to 
ouote from the Irishman. Then it is ornamen* dwith 
the coat-of-arms of Georgia, cannon and other im- 
plements of war. It is decorated on all mei^orial 
days bv the ladies aud cared for constantly by Mr. 
Herbst. It cost 84,500. Hon. John P. Fort, then ol 
Macon, paid the expenses of its dedication in 1878 — 
$500. 

HOMELESS VETERANS IN GEORGIA. 



The general public, interested in such matters, 
knows how zealously and successfully our people in 
Georgia worked to secure a Home in the vicinity of 
the capital for disabled Confederate veterans, and that 
the State Legislature has refused again and again to 
accept the property, coupled with a provision to ap- 
propriate a maintenance fund. The trustees, not 
content to surrender the cause, have considered several 
plans for carrying it on. Col. Brewster submitted a 
plan to them, which meets with general favor, for or- 
ganizing a stock company of persons who will take 
the property, giving so much annually, as necessary 
to its support, and then to own it when its special 
uses are done. 

The Constitution says : 

" It is fortunate that the trustees of the Soldiers' 
Home have been called together for an early meeting. 



"Public sentiment has crystalized into the proper 
shape for action, and we are gratified to see that the 
suggestion of Colonel Brewster, in regard "to organiz- 
ing astock company to run the Home is very gener- 
ally indorsed. Other good suggestions will doubtless 
be made, and it is to be hoped that the trustees will 
feel encouraged to make another effort to save this 
splendid charity for our needy and homeless veterans." 

The Richmond Dispatch says: 

" It is a lamentable sight to see a battle-scarred sol- 
dier of the Confederacy in a poor-house. It is well- 
calculated to arouse the suspicion that there is more 
buncombe than heartfelt sympathy in the often-heard 
praise of the men who fought our battles. 

If these Soldiers' Homes did no more good than to 
save a few of these veterans from the poor-houses, we 
could well afford to maintain them. It is disgraceful 
that any worthy veteran of the Confederate Army 
should be forced to live the life of a pauper. It is a 
fact, too, that many veterans who have homes, so- 
called, an- neither welcome nor comfortable in them. 
To these, also, the Soldiers' Homes offer shelter, food 
and respectable companionship. 

We shall not presume to offer any advice to the gal- 
lant people of the great State of Georgia, but we can 
truly say that the Confederate Home here has been of 
vast service It could be of greater service still, if it 
had more funds at its disposal. * * * 

"This we know from what we saw of theGeorgio sol- 
diers in the battles around Richmond, that no pro- 
vision the Legislature of that State could make for 
caring for them in their old age and helplessness would 
be beyond their deserts." 

The St. Louis Republic urges the Trustees not to give 
up the Home, and hopes that the people of Georgia 
will support it freely and voluntarily. It thinks that 
the ladies of the State would take care of it. 

"From every quarter come expressions of surprise 
and indignation at the defeat of this patriotic enter- 
prise. In self-detenst — in order to set Georgia right 
before the world — our people must come to the rescue 
of the home,, and show that they do not propose to 
have any of their old defenders sent to the poor-house 
while they have it in their power to aid them. 

" W • are not committed to any particular plan, but 
we hope that the trustees will give the situation their 
careful consideration, with a view to opening and 
maintaining the Home for the next twenty years. A 
stock company organized on the proper basis can make 
the institution a success, and get its money back out 
of the property with a good profit." 

"Comment upon the situation by the Sunny South : 
The Legislature is of fifty days and'full of buncombe; 
it assembleth with great dignity and adjourneth with 
much joy, and four dollars per diem ; it mnketh a trip 
to the World's Fair, and payeth its expense out of an 
appropriation ; it cometh back and sitteth down on 
the old veterans with a loud noise; it appropriateth 
much lucre to educate the colored man, but verily it 
knoweth it to be a good investment, for it shall re- 
turn after many days through the convict lessee." 



If New Orleans can erect $150,000 worth of Confed- 
erate monuments, and Richmond near that amount, 
should the entire South hesitate in an undertaking to 
cost only $250,000? 



IO 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



WORK OF THE VETERANS. 



PLAITS ADOPT! D FOB A PUBLIC SUBSCRIPTION IX 

Mississippi. 



The State* Committee appointed to raise funds for 
* 
the monument to Jefferson Davis, at Richmond. Va., 

for the state of Mississippi, met in the Governor's 

office on Thursday. The members of the committee 

present were Maj.-Gen. Stephen D. Lee, Chairman; 

Gov. .'. M. Stone, ex-Gov. Robert Lowry and Col. C. 

C. Flowerree, Lieut. -Col. Fred J. V. LeDand, the other 

member, absent. 

The committee passed the following resolutions: 

1. That Col. J. L. Power be appointed a committee 
of one to correspond and ascertain what amount of 
money has been subscribed in different localit : ' is 
the State to erect a monument to Jefferson Davis, and 
if said money ran be used for the monument in 
Richmond. 

2. That for purposes for organization, the Chair- 
man of this committee, Gen. Lee, open correspondence 
with the Sheriff of each county in the State, who, 
with the Chancery and Circuit Clerks, will be re- 
quested to send him the names of six representative 
Confederate ladies of the county, who will be a Cen- 
tral Committee for the county to raise funds for the 
" Jefferson Davis Monument,'' in Richmond, with such 
other local committees throughout the county in each 
supervisor's district, as they may appoint to assist 
them. That Jan. 2, 1893, be named as a day to get 
subscriptions for the monument, and thereafter on 
each first day of succeeding months till the amount 
is obtained. Subscriptions to be not less than 25 
cents or more than 81 for each individual. Gen. Lee 
to perfect the organization and arrange for the receipt 
of the money. 

3. That the Chairman of the eomirlittee, Gen. 
Lee, appeal to comrades Col. J. L. Power, Col. J. R. 
Binford, Col. T. H. Jones, Col. P. M. Savery and Col. 
J. R. Mcintosh, to deliver addresses or lectures in 
their own and adjacent counties and in such other 
localities as they desire in the State, for the purpose of 
raising funds for the erection of the monument to 
President Davis at Richmond, Va., and that Gen. Lee, 
in making this request known to the comrades 
mentioned, state that this committee feels confident 
that they can rely on their compliance in this work 
that is so near the heart of every Confederote veteran. 

4. That the Chairman, Gen. Lee, be requested to 
appeal to the press of the State to assist the committee, 
the different local organizations, the lecturers and 
other instrumentalities in carrying out the purpose in 
view. 

Gen. E. D. Hall, Chairman for North Carolina, in a 
recent letter says: "Please forward to me all infor- 
mation possible that may assist in the work. As you 
will see by the papers I have commenced operations, 



and I intend t>> push it to the utmost of my ability.! 

I shall ba\ ( the bulk of the work, but North Carolina 
will do hi i share. 

Gen. B. T. Duval reports organization of the follow- 
ing Camps in Arkansas: .The Ben T. Duval, at Fort 
Smith; Pen MeCulloeh. ;it Creenwood; Stonewall 
Jackson, at Hockett City; Cabell, at Alma; John 
Wallace, :it Van Buren ; • Gratoit, a< Hope; Joe Neal, 
at Nashville: Haller, at Centre Point; R. W. Harper, 
at Morrillton; Jeff Davis, at Conway : W. LI. Hrooks. 
at Favetteville, and thai there are others in process of 
organization. 

In an address to Mississippians, Col. .1. L. Power 
says: " Being anxious tp discharge the duty assigned 
me to the best of my ability, I will be thankful for in- 
formation as to the whereabouts of amounts already 
subscribed for, a monument to Mr. Davis. Imme- 
diately after his death a State Monument Association 
was organized in Jackson, and subscriptions were 
made in several places — some on condition that the 
Monument should be in Mississippi, and others with- 
out such condition. The Commanders of Camps of 
Confederate Veterans, and the Sheriffs, are specially 
requested to inquire as to these funds, and have them 
forwarded to John S. Ellett, President of the State 
Bank, at Richmond, Va., and advise me of the amount 
and date when forwarded." 

IN SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Hon. John L. Webber, of Charleston, S. C, sends 
out this circular: " Dear Sir — I desire to call your at- 
tention to the action recently taken by the combined 
associations working to raise funds for the erection of 
a monument to President Jefferson Davis. It has 
been decided that this monument shall be erected at 
Richmond, the Capital of the Confederacy, and $250,- 

000 is wanted for the work. We feel sure that this 
amount will be easily and quickly raised. The South- 
ern people owe it to themselves that a fitting memo- 
rial should be erected to the man who will stand in 
history as the chief representative of principle-, that 
are dear to their hearts. I feel that it is useless to 
urge this matter. I hope you will take steps at once 
to raise as much money from your friends as you can. 

1 would suggest the enlistment of the ladies in this 
cause, and feel sure that considerable money can be 
raised during the fall and winter through entertain- 
ments of various kinds. All moneys collected should 
be sent at once to Mr. John S. Ellett, Richmond, Va., 
who is the bonded Treasurer of the combined Monu- 
ment Funds. 

Gen. Ben T. Duval, Chairman for Arkansas, expects 
to convene his committee at Little Rock this month 
during the session of the Legislature. 

Some of the States have not organized because .of 
the inability of the Chairman to take charge of the 
work. Preparation is being made to supplv these de- 
ficiencies, and it is expected that organization will be 
completed in the States, also in New York and Chicago. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



ii 



UNITED CONFEDERATE VETERANS. 

The first article of the constitution of the asso- 
ciation declares : " The object and purpose of "this or- 
ganization will be strictly social, literary, historical 
and benevolent. It w ill endeavor to unite in a gen- 
eral federation all associations of the Confederate vet- 
erans, soldiers and sailors, now in existence or here- 
after to, be formed ; to gather authentic data for an im- 
partial history of the war between the States; to pre- 
serve the relics or mementoes of the same; to cherish 
the ties of friendship that exist among the men who 
have shared common dangers, common Buffering and 
privations ; to care for the disabled and extend a help- 
ing hand to the needy; to protect the widow and or- 
phan and to make and preserve the record of the serv- 
ices of every member, and as far as possible of those 
of our comrades who have preceded us in eternity." 

The last article provides that neither discussion of 
political or religious subjects nor any political action 
shall be permitted in the organization, and any asso- 
ciation violating that provision shall forfeit its 
membership. 

(l§n. J. B. Gordon, the Commander of the Veterans, 
in an address to the soldiers and sailors, said: 

Comrades, no argument is needed to secure for those 
objects your enthusiastic indorsement. They have 
burdened your thoughts for many years; you have 
cherished them in sorrow, poverty and humiliation. 
In the face of misconstruction you have held them in 
vour hearts with the strength of religious convictions. 
fto misjudgments can defeat your peaceful purpose - 
for the future. Vour aspirations have been lifted by 
the mere force and urgency of surrounding conditions 
to a plane far above t he palt ry considerat ion of parti- 
san triumphs. The honor of the American govern- 
ment, the just powersof the Federal government, the 
equal rights of States, the integrity of the consti- 
tutional union, the sanctions of law and the enforce- 
ment of order have no class of defenders more true 
and devoted than the ex-soldiers of the South and 
their worthy descendants. Hut you realize the great 
truth that a people without the memories of heroic 
suffering or sacrifice are a people without a history. 

To cherish such memories and recall such a past. 
whether crowned with success or consecrated in de- 
feat is to idealize principle and strengthen character, in- 
tensify love of country and convert defeat and disaster 
into pillars of support for future manhood and noble 
womanhood. Whether the Southern people under 
their changed conditions may ever hope to witness 
another civilization which shall equal that which be- 
gan with their Washington and ended with their Lee, 
it is certainly true that 'devotion to their glorious past 
is not only the surest guarantee of future progress and 
the holiest bond of unity, but is also the strongest 
claim they can present to the confidence and respect 
of the other sections of the Union. 

In conclusion, I beg to repeat, in substance at least, 
a few thoughts recently expressed by me to the State 
organization, which apply with equal force to this 
general brotherhood. 

It is political in no sense except so far as the word 
" political " is a synonym of the word " patriotic." It 



is a brotherhood over which the genius of philan- 
thropy and patriotism, of truth and of justice will 
preside; of philanthropy, because it will succor the 
disabled, help the needy, strengthen the weak and 
cheer the disconsolate; of patriotism, because it will 
cherish the past glories of the dead Confederacy and 
transmute them into living inspirations for future 
service to the living republic ; of truth, because it will 
seek to gather and preserve as witnesses for history 
the unimpeachable facts which shall doom falsehood 
to die that truth may live, of justice, because it will 
cultivate National as well as Southern fraternity and 
will condemn narrow-mindedness and prejudice and 
passion, and cultivate that broader, higher and nobler 
sentiment, which would write on the grave of every 
soldier who fell on our side : " Here lies an American 
hero, a martyr to the right as his conscience con- 
ceived it." 

I rejoice that a general organization too, long neg- 
lected, has at last been perfected. It is an organiza- 
tion which all honorable men must approve and 
which heaven itself will bless. I call upon you, 
therefore, to organize in every State and community 
where ex-Confederates may reside, and rally to the 
support of the high and peaceful objects of the United 
Confederate Veterans, and move forward until by the 

Eower of organization and persistent effort your 
eneficent and Christian purposes are fully accom- 
plished. 

UNITED CONFEDERATE VETERAN I WIT-. 
ALABAMA. 

POST-OFI II I . CAMP. NO. OKU 

Bessemer Bessemer 187... W. H. Jones, N. H.Sewall. 

Birmingham W.J. Hnnlee 8»...Oen. F. 8 Ferguson, R. E. 

Jot: 

Eutaw Banders. U Capt. G.H. Dole, T.H.Mundy. 

Mobile.. Raphael Semmes n Cant. Thos. T. Roche. Wm. 

E. HI 

Montgomery. .Lomax 151...Capt. Emmet. Selbels, J. H. 

' Higglns. 

ARKANSAS. 

Benton vllle ......Cabell 89 Capt. N. 8. Henry, A. J. Bates. 

Fort Smith Ben T. Duval 146.. .Capt. P. T. Devaney, John T. 

Duval. 

FLORIDA. 

Brookvllle W. W. Loring 13 Oeii. John ('. Devant, Col. 

Fred L. Robertson. 

Dade Cltv Pasco C. V. Ass'n.... 57. ..Capt. John B. Johnston, A. 

H. Ravesles. 

Fernandlno Nassau 104. Thos. A. Hull. 

Iverncss Geo. T.Ward 148 Capt. W. C. Zimmerman. W. 

s. Turner. 

Jacksonville ..R. E. I,ee 5K Gen. Wm. Baya, C. W. Smith. 

Jasper Slewarl 156. ..Capt. H. J. Stewart. 

Lak. i Lty. .Columbia Co 150...Capt. W. R, Moore, W. M. Ives 

Marlanna Milton 132. ..Capt. W. 1). Barnes, Frank 

Philip. 

Montlcello Patton Anderson... 60 ...Capt. W. C. Bird, B. W. Part- 

ridge. 

Ocala MarlonCo.C. V. A 56 < apt. J. J. Flnley, Wm. Fox. 

Orlando Orange Co 54. ..Capt. W. H. Jewell, B. M. 

Robinson. 

Palmetto Geo. T.Ward 53...Japt. J. C. Pelot.J.W. Nettles. 

Pensacola Ward C. V. Ass'n 10.Gen.Geo. Reese, C.V. Thomp- 
son. 

Quinev . D.Ij. Kenan. 140. ..Capt. R. H. M. Davidson, D. 

M. McMillan. 

st. Augustine ..E. Klrby Smith 17"> ('apt. J. A. Enslow, Jr. 

Sanford a Gen. J. Flnnegan 149 Capt. A. M. Thrasher, C. H. 

Lefler. 

Tallahassee Lamar 161. ..R. A. Whitfield. 

Tampa HUlsboro 36 ...Capt. F. W. Merrln, H. L. 

Crane. 

Tltusvllle Indian River 47. Capt. Jas. Prltchett, A. D. 

Cohen. 

GEORGIA. 

Atlanta Fulton Co., Ga 159. ..Gen. W. L. Calhoun, John F. 

Edwards. 



12 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



Daltoo Jos.E. Johnston 84. ..Capt. A. F. Roberts, J. A. 

Blanton. 

Spring Place John B. Gordon 50.. .Capt. R. E.Wilson, W. H. 

Ramsey. 
ILLINOIS. 

Chicago Ex-Con. Ase'n 8...Capt John W. White, R Lee 

France. 

INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Ardroore John H. Morgan 107... Capt. J. L. Gaut, R. Scales. 

McAlester Jeff Lee 88.. Gen. N. P. Guy, R. B. Cole- 
man. 

KENTUCKY. 
Bowling Green.Bowllng Green 148 ..Capt. W. F. Perry, James A. 

Mitchell. 
Cynthlana Cynthlana 99 Capt. D. M. Snyder, Thos. 8. 

Logwood. 



Georgetown Georgetown.. 



... 98. ..Capt. A. H.Sinclair, Thos. S. 

Logwood. 
Hnrrodsburg Harroddsburg 98. ..Capt. Bush W. Allln, Thos. 8. 

Logwood. 
Lawreneeburg...Lawrenceburg 101. ..Capt. P. H. Thomas, Thos. S. 

Logwood. 
Lexington Lexington 100. ..Gen. John Boyd, Thos. S. 

Logwood. 

Paducah A.P.Thompson 174. ..Cant. W. G. Bullitt, J. M. 

Browne. 

Paris Paris ft">...Capt. A. T. Forsyth, Thos. S. 

Logwood. 

Russellville John W. Caldwell. ..139... Mol. J. B. Brlggs, W. B. Mc- 
carty. 

Versailles Versailles 96. ..Capt. Jos. C. Bailey, Thos. 8. 

Logwood. 

LOUISIANA. 

Alexandria Jeff Davis O...Gen. Geo. O. Watts, Capt. W. 

W. Whittlngton. 

Amite City Amite City 78.. .Capt. A. P. Richards, G. W. 

Bankston. 

Baton Rouge Baton Rouge 17. Gen. John McGrath, F. W. 

Heroman. 

Berwick Winchester Hull 178... Capt. M. W. Bateman, F. O. 

Brian. 

Donaldson vlllcMaJ. V. Mauiln 38.. .Capt. 8. A. Poche.P. Ganel. 

Evergreen R L. Gibson 83. Col. Win. M.Ewell, I.C. John- 
son. 

Lake Charles Calcasieu C. Vet 02. ..Capt. W. A. Knapp, W. L. 

Hutchlngs. 

Mansfield Mouton 41. ..Capt. Cbas. Schuler, T. G. 

Peg lies. 
Merrick Isaiah Norwood 110. ..Capt.. D. T. Merrick, J. Jewell 

Taylor. 
Nad liltoches... Natchitoches 40 ..(.'apt. J. Alp. Prudhomme, C. 

K. Levy. 
New Orleans Army of N. Va I. ..Col. W. R Lyman, Thos. B. 

O'Brien. 
New Orleans Army of Teun 2. ..Gen. John Glynn, Jr., Nicho- 
las Cuny. 
New Orleans Wash. Artillery 15. ..Col. B. F. Eshelmnn, Lteut.- 

Col. L. A. Adam. 
New Orleans Henry St. Pnul 1(1.. .Gen. Jos. Demoruelle, Col. M. 

T. Docros. 

OpelOUKlls It. E. Lee 14. ..Capt. L. D. Prescott, Col. B. 

Blooinncld. 
Plai|iienilne Iberville 18. ..('apt. ('bus. H. Dickinson, 

John L. Durdcnne. 

Hayvllle Rlelllillld 

Husttn Knstln 



1,12 .. (apt. Johns. Sunwnerlln, O. 

T. Smith. 

7...t'iipt. Allen Baikdale, J. L. 

Bond. 

Shrevcport- Gen. Lcroy Stafford 3 ...Cant. Wm. Kinney, Will H. 

I'unnarri. 



Tiinglpuhou Cninp Since.. 



(K) (apt. O. P. A mucker, O. R. 



ant. O. 
Tn) lor, 



MISSISSIPPI. 

Boonevllle W. H. H. Tlson 1711. ..(apt. D. T. Henll, J.W. Smith. 

Columbus Ishnm Harrison 27. Dr. It, A. Vuiiglniii, W. A. 

Campbell. 
Crystal Sp'gs Bon Humphreys 19 Capt. C. Humphries, .1. M. 

Haley. 
Edwards W. A. Montgomery 20...C«pt. W. A. Montgomery, H. 

YV. Barrett. 
Fayette J. J. Whitney 22 ...Cupt. W. L. Stephen, W. K. 

Penny. 

Hattlcsburg Hattlcsburg 21 ...Cupt. Geo. D. Harttleld, Evan 

II. Harris. 

•Holly Springs. ..Kit Mott 23. Capt. Jus. F. Flint, Sum. H. 

Pryor. 

Jackson Robt. A. Smith 24. ..Capt. W. D. Holder, George s. 

Green. 
Macon Jas. Longstreet 180.. Capt. W. H. Foote, J. L. 

Griggs. 
Meridian Walthall 2.1. .Capt. W. F. Brown, B. V. 

White. 



Miss. City Beauvalr.., 120. ..Gen. J. R Davis, F. S. Hewes. 

Natchez Natchex..... '....■ 20.. Lieut. -Col. F. J. V. LeCand, 

E. L. Hopkins. 

Port Gibson Claiborne 187. ..Capt. A. K. Jones, Wm, W. 



?apt. A. 
Moore. 



Rosedale Montgomery 52. ..Col. F. A. Montgomery, Chas. 

C. Farrar. 

Tupelo John M.Stone 181. ..Gen. John M.Stone, P. M. 

Savery. 
Vlcksburg Vlcksburg 82...Capt. D. A. Campbell, Clem 

Davis. 
Woodvllle' Woodvllle 49. ..Capt. J. H. Jones, P. M. 

Stockett. 
Yazoo City Yazoo Camp 176. ..Capt. S. D. Bobertson, W. R. 

McCutcheon. 

MISSOURI. 

Kansas City Kansas City 80. ..Capt. Jos. W. Mercer, Geo. B. 

Spratt. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 
Clinton Sampson 137. ..Capt. R. H. Holliday, C. P. 

Henlng. 
Newton Catawba 162. ..Capt. J. <i. Hull, L. K. Whlt- 

ener. 

OKLAHOMA. 

Oklahoma C't. D. H. Haninion.. 177. ..Capt. J. W. Johnston, John 

O. Cusler. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Aiken Barnard E. Bee 84. ..Capt. B. H. Teugue, J. N. 

Wlgfall. 

St. Georges Stephen Elliott B1...J. Otey Reed. 

TENNESSEE. 

Chattanooga N. B. Forrest 4. ..Gen. J. F. Shlpp, L. T. Dick- 
inson. 

Clarksvlllc Forbes 77. ..Cant. T. H. Smith, Clay 

Stacker. 

Fayettevllle S'kelford-Fulton 114. ..Col. James D. Tillman, W. H. 

Cash Ion. 



Franklin.. 



..John L. McEwen . —...Capt. B. F. Roberts, R. N. 



pt. B. F 

Richards 



Jackson John Ingram 37 ..Cupt. E. 8. Mallory, S. E. Ker- 

tolf. 

Knoxvllle Felix K. Zolllcoffer...46... Capt. John F. Horn, Chas. 



ipt. John 
Ducloux. 



KiKixvllle Fred Ault 6. ..Col. Frank A. Moses, MaJ. J. 

W. S. Frlerson. 
Lewlsburg Dibrell 55...Capt. W. P. Irvine, W. G. 

Lloyd,. 
McKenzle.... Stonewall Jackson.. 42. ..Capt. Marsh Atklsson, Dr. J. 

P. Cannon. 

Memphis Con. His. Ass'n 28.. .Col. C. W. Frazer, R. J. Black. 

Murfreesboro.. .. Joe B. Palmer 81. ..Capt. W. S. McLemore. Wm. 

Led better. 

Nashville Frank Cheutham... 35. Elder R. Lin Cave, Col. John 

P. Hickman. 



Shelby vi Me Win. Frlerson.. 



B3 ...Capt. John M. Hastings. Jno. 
G. Arnold. 

Tulluhomn Pierce B. A nderson.173... Capt. J. P. Bennett, W. J. 

Travis. 

12.. .Capt. W. H. Brannan, J. J. 

Martin. 
TEXAS. 

Abilene Abilene F2...T. W. Dougherty. 

Abilene Taylor Co 69...Col. H. L. Bentlcy, Theo. 

Heyck. 



Winchester Turney 



Alvarado.. 



..Alvurado 160. J. R. Posey. 



Athens Howdy Martin 65. ..Capt. D. M. Morgan, W. T. 

Eustace. 

Atlanta Stonewall Jackson.. 91 ..Cant. J. 1). Johnson, James 

N. Simmons. 

Austin John B Hood 103. .. Capt. Wm. M. Brown, Chas. 

H. Powell. 
Beaumont A. S. Johnston 75. ..('apt. Jen" Chaisson, Tom J- 

Russell, 

Beltow Bell Co. ex-Con As .122. ('apt. H. M. Cook, R H.Tur- 
ner. 

Bonhum Sul Ross 164. ..('apt. J. P. Holmes. 

Brownwood Stonewall Jackson .118.. .Capt. Carl Vincent, R. L. 



Bryan 



..J.B.Robertson 124. .. Cupt. H. B. Stoddard, W. H. 

Harmon. 



Buffalo! iup Camp Moody — ..Capt. Ben F. Jones, J. J. 

Ewbank. 

Calvert W. P. Townsend 111. ..Capt. J. H. Drennon, C. W. 

Hlgglnbotliain. 

Cumersou Ben MeCullough 29.. . Capt. E. J. Mclver, Joseph B. 

Moore. 

..union James L. Hogg i:«...Cnpt. T. J. Towles, W. D. 

Thompson. 

Carthage Hornce RAiidnll 163...J. R. Bond, J. M. Woolworth. 

Cleburne Pat Cleburne 88.. Capt. O. T. Plummer, 8. C. 

Scurlock. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



13 



Colorado Albert Sidney — .. 

Columbus Shropshire-Upton ...112;. 

Coleman John Pi lham 76.. 

Corpus Christ!.. .Jos. E. Johnston 63.. 

Corstcana C. M. Winkler 147.. 

Crockett." Crockett 141.. 

Caldwell Camp Rogers 142. 

Dallas Sterling Price 31.. 

Decatur Ben McCulloch 30.. 

Denton Snl Ross 129.. 

Dublin Erath A Comanche H i 

Fairfield Win. I.. M ly 87.. 

Farney Camp Bee 180.. 



.Capt. W. V. Johnson, Tbos. 

Q. Mullin. 
..Capt. Geo. McCormlck, J. J. 

Dick. 
Capt. J. J. Callan, James M. 

Williams. 
Capt. H. R. Sutherland. M. C. 

Spvnn. 
Capt. R. M.Collins. 
Capt. Enoch Branson, J. F. 

Martin. 
.J. F. Matthews. 
Capt. J. J. Miller. Gen. Wm. 

L. Thompson. 
Capt. Will A. Miller, A. Ed- 
wards. 

('apt. Hugh McKenxie, J. R. 

Burton, 
(ien. J. T. Harris, L. E. (iil- 

lett. 
.Capt. (Jeo. T. Bradley. L. G. 
Sandlfer. 

Capt, T. M. Daniel, 8. G. 

Fleming. 



Sulphur Sp'gs...Matt Ashcroft 170. ..Capt. R. M. Henderson, M. G. 

Millar. 

Taylor A.S.Johnston 165.. Capt. M. Ross, P. Hawkins. 

Tyler A.S.Johnston 48. ..Capt. James P. Douglas, Sid 

S. Johnson. 
Vernon Camp Cabell 125 ..Capt. Shem E. Hatehett, M. 

D. Davis. 
• Waxahachle Jeff Davie 108. ..Capt. R. P. Mackey, W. M. 

McKnight. 
Weatherford Tom Green 1*9. Capt. J. P. Rice, M. V. Kln- 

nlson. 
Wichita Falls... W. J. Hardee 78. Capt. C. R. Crockett. N. A. 

Robinson. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Washington Wash. City Con 171 .MaJ. Albert Akers. 



Fort Worth It. K. Lee 158 Col. B. B. i-addock 

Frost R. Q, MilN Kw; 



Gainesville Jos. E. Johnston 1 1 «• 

Galveston.... Magruder 106. 

Gatesvllle Ex-C. A. Coryell Co 185 

Goldthwalte Jerl Davis 117.. 

Gonzai.-s Gonsale* 156 

Graham .... Young County 127.. 

Gran bury Granbnry 87 

Hamilton A. S. Johnston 116.. 

Hemstead Tom (ireen 188 

Henrietta Sul Ross 172.. 

Hlllshoro Hill County 

.Kaufman Gto. D. Manlon US.. 

Kingston A. S. Johnston 71 

Ladonla Roht. E.Lee 126. 

I.aGrange Col. B. Tlmnions 61.. 

Lampasas R. E. Lee 6H. 

Lubbock F. R. Lubbock 188.. 

Madisonvllle Johh O. Walker 128 . 

Meridian A. S. Johnston 115 

Merkel Merkel 79. 

Mexia Joe Johnston 94 

Mlnneola Wood County 153.. 

Mt. Enterprise Kosscr 82 

Mt. Pleasant Col. Dud Jones 121.. 

Montague Bob stone 93. 

McKlnney Collin County 109.. 

Navasota Pat Cleburne 102 

Palestine Palestine 44.. 

Pails A.M. Johnston 70 

Paint Rock...... Jeff Davis 168.. 

Rockwall Rockwall 74., 

Roby W. W. Lorlng 1.54 . 

San Antonio A.S.Johnston 144.. 



Capt. A. Chamberlain, Dr. M. 
F. Wakefield. 

Capt .1 M. Wright, John T. 
Walker. 

Gen. T. X. Waul, Chris C. 

H, avails. 
W. I.. Saunders. 

Ma], .1. E. Martin, F. H.Tay- 
lor. 

Maj. W. B. Savers, M. East- 
land. 

Capt A. T. <iay. Y. M. Ed- 
wards. 

.1. A. Formlvalt. I. R. Morris 

(apt. W. T. Sax, .11. 1 < 
Powell. 

('apt. Van B. Thorn ton, Barn 
Schwarz. 

Capt. F. J. Barren, c. B. Pat- 
terson. 

Win. A. Fields. 

Cant. Jos. Hufi'master, K. S. 
Pipes. 

Capt. J. F. Puckett. T. J. Fos- 
ter. 

.Cant. (i. W. lllakcn.y. F. W. 



'apt. (J. W. 
Rlakeney. 



Capt. R. H. Phelps. Nalt H,,l 

man. 
.1. S. Lauderdale. D. c . 

Thomas. 
(apt. W. D. Crump, (i. W 

Shannon 
R. Wiley. 
Capt. Robert Donnell, J. W. 

Adams [acting). 
(ape J. T Tucker, A. A. 

Baker. 
Capt. ('. L. Watson, H. W. 

Williams. 

("apt. J. H. Huftmastcr. Geo; 
A. Cage. 

(apt. Thos. Turner, Ben Bird- 
well. 

Capt. ('. L. Dlllabnnty. .1. C. 
Turner. 

Capt. Bob Eean, R. D. Rng- 

eley. 
.Gen. W. M. Bush, H. C. Mack. 
Capt.W. E. Barry. R. M. West. 
Capt. J. W. Ewlng, J. M. Ful- 

llnwider. 

('apt. Geo. H. Provlne, John 
W. Webb. 

Capt. W. T. Melton, J. W. 
Ratchford. 

.('apt. M.S. Austin, X. C Ed- 
wards, 
('apt. D. Speer, W. H. Smith. 

Cant. John S. Ford, Taylor 
McRae. 



Monument to be Erected in Chicago. — An address 
of the Ex-Confederate Association of Chicago says: 
"This Association has appointed a committee for the 
purpose of raising funds with which to erect a monu- 
ment over 7,000 American soldiers who did while 
prisoners of war at Camp Don glass, ah d who now lie 
in unmarked and neglected graves at Oakwoods Cem- 
etery, near this city, where several acres have been 
assigned us through the medium of the War Depart- 
ment, on which we purpose to erect this monument 
as a fitting memorial to our former companions in 
arm-. And we trust that a- it is lifted toward the 
peaceful skies it may he symbolical of that sweet and 
enduring peace with which a great nation emphasizes 
its unstinted, brotherly reunion. On our committee 
are the names ol three honorary members of our Asso- 
ciation who were gallant soldiers of the Union Army, 
viz., (ien. I. X. Stile-. Gen. Joseph Stockton and 
Charles I'. Packer, President of the Park National 
Hank of Chicago, which is t lie depository of the fund. 
We re<|urst our friends to send contributions to the 
above-named bank. Any information in regard to the 
matter can be obtained by addressing either Col John 
George Ryan, chairman, or F. It. Southmayd, secre- 
tary. Room 615, No. 'i'io Dearborn street, Chicago. 



pessi< >m:i;s ixder pay of the hoyersmf.st. 



Washington, Nov. 30. — The annual report of Mr. 
Greene B. Raum, Commissioner of Pensions, made 
public to-day, shows that there were oil the pension 
rolls June 30, 1892, 876,068 pensioners, an increase 
during the year of 199,908. 

The total amount expended during the fiscal year 
was 8139,03-5,612. For the present fiscal year $144.- 
956,000 is appropriated. The Commissioner estimates 
that a deficiency appropriation of 110.508,621 will be 
necessary. An estimate of $165,000,000 is submitted 
for tlie next fiscal vear. 



THE PERCY <!RE<. HISTORY. 



Capt. T. H. C. Peery, R. J. 
Browning. 



Seymour Bedford Forrest 86 

Sherman Mildred Lee, 90. C 

Sweetwater E. C. Walthall 92 



H 



alker. 



Capt. W. D. Beall. J. H. Free- 
man. 



Messrs West. Johnston & Co., of Richmond, have 
published recently a history of the United States 
"from the foundation of Virginia to the reconstruction 
of the Union." It is an octavo volume and sold at 
$2.50. The work is by an enlightened Englishmen, 
who "has beon brave enough" to give the South an 
impartial and just place in history, and, as such, 
merits the approval and interest of all Southerners. 

The English edition is entirely out of print, copies 
of it cannot be had at any price. 



14 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



THE REBEL YELL. 



Many people think of the three measured huzzas 
given now and then as "the rebel yell." It ie shock- 
ing to an old Confederate to consider such deception. 
The venerable widow of Hear Admiral Raphael 
Semraee, in attending a Confederate reunion at Mem- 
phis a couple of year.- ago, modestly expressed her 
wish to hear "the rebel yell." Something of an old 
time cheer came from the throats of men who gladly 
tried to compliment the wife of the eminent naval 
commander. Kellar Anderson, who was of the Ken- 
tucky Orphan Brigade and had heard the yell, wrote a 
reminiscence for the Memphis Appeal. It is this 
saint Anderson, called Captain and again Gen. Ander- 
son, who honored his native Kentucky, his adopted 
Tennessee and American heroism some months ago at 
i 'oal Creek, in defying the miners who had captured 
him and demanded ransom for his head, when it 
seemed but madness to refuse their demands. One 
thing is sure, he had heard "the rebel yell." 

" There is a Southern mother on this stand who 
says she wants to hear the rebel yell once more." 

" The announcement transforms, and in an instant 
1 find myself acting the humble part of file-closer to 
Company I. Fifth Kentucky Infantry, with pieces at 
the right shoulder, the brigade in route column. 
With the active, strong, swinging stride of the en- 
thusiastic trained soldier, they hold the double cpuick 
over rocks, logs, gullies, undergrowth, hill and vale, 
until amid the ioliage of the trees above them, the 
hulling shell and hissing shot from the enemy's field 
guns gives notice that if retreating they have missed 
the way. Yet, there is no command to halt. Direct, 
on unchanged course, this battle-scarred and glory- 
mantled battalion of Kentucky youths continues, 
and as thev reach the open woods, in clarion tones 
comes the order, 'Change front, forward on first com- 
pany," etc. The order executed found them formed 
on ground but recently occupied by a battalion of 
their foes, and few of these had left their positions. 
The battalion of Kentuckians were in battle array 
where once were they, but now the ground was almost 
literally covered with the Federal dead, the entire 
length of our regiment of 700 men. Men, did I say? 
Soldiers is the word; there were few men among them, 
they being youths, but soldiers indeed. The increas- 
ing'spat, whirl and hiss of the minnie balls hurrying 
by, left no doubt of the fact among these soldiers. 
They are about to enter the action again and forward 
is the order. 'Steady, men, steady; hold your fire; 
not a shot without orders. It is hard to stand, but 
you must not return it. We have friends in our front 
yet. They are being hard pressed, and their ammu- 
nition is almost expended, but they are of our proud- 
est and best, and Humphries' Mississippians will hold 
that ridge while they have a cartridge. 

" It is nearing sunset, and after two days of fearful 
carnage — aye, one of the best contested battles of the 
times, the enemy has been driven pell-mell from 
many parts of the field. Our losses are numbered by 
thousands, and we are now advancing in battle array, 
the little red flag with blue cross dancing gaily in the 
air over heads of those who were there to defend it. 



The last rays of the setting sun had kissed the 
autumn foil ige when we stepped into open ground 
and found that we were amid the wreck of what a 
few short minutes ago bad been a superb six-gun bat- 
tery! The uniform of the dead artillerymen and the 
gaily caparisoned bodies of the many dead horses, 
proclaimed this destruction the work of our friends. 
We look upon the dead, pull our cartridge boxes a 
little more to the front and resolve once more to face 
the destruction we are now entering. The boom of 
artillery increases. The rattle of musketry is steady 
— aye, incessant and deadly. The sulphurous smoke 
has' increased until almost stifling. Only fifty yards 
of space separates us from the gallant Mississippians, 
we are there to support. They have clung to the 
ridge with a death-like grip, but their last cartridge 
has been fired at the enemy, and their support being 
at hand these sturdy soldiers of Long-treet's corps are 
ordered to retire. 

" Simultaneously the support was ordered forward. 
As the Mississipiaiis retired, the deep-volumed shouts 
of the enemy told us plainer than could words that 
the enemy thought they had routed them. Oh, how 
differently we regarded the situation! If they .mid 
have seen them as we — halting, kneeling, lying down, 
ranging themselves in columns of files behind the 
large trees to enable us to get at the enemy with an 
unbroken front, each man as we passed throwing cap 
high into the overhanging foliage in honor of our 
presence — then I imagine their shouts would have 
been suppressed. 'Steady in the center! Hold your 
fire! Hold the colors back!' The center advanced 
too rapidly. We are clear of our friends now, only 
the enemy in front, and we meet face to face on a spur 
of Mission Ridge, which extends through theSnodjirass 
farm, and we are separated by eightv yards. Thud! 
and down goes Private Robertson. He turned, smiled 
and died. Thud! Corporal Gray shot through the 



neck. 'Get to the rear! 



id I. Thud! Thud! 



Thud! Wolf, Michael, the gallant Thompson. Thud! 
Thud! Thud! Courageous Oxley, the knightly 
Desha, and duty-loving Cummings. And thus it goes. 
The fallen increase, and are to be counted by the hun- 
dreds. The pressure is fearful, but the 'sand-digger' 
is there to stay. 'Forward! Forward!' rang out 
along the line. We move slowly to the front. 



"There is now sixty yards between us. The enemy 
scorn to fly ; he gives back a few paces ; he retires a 
little more^ but still faces us, and loads as he backs 
away. We are now in the midst of his dead and 
dying, but he stands as do the sturdy oaks about him. 
We have all that is possible for human to bear ; our 
losses are fearful, and each moment some comrade 
passes to the unknown. At last Humphries' Missis- 
sippians have replenished boxes and are working 
arounil our right. Trigg's Virginians are uncovering 
to our left. I feel a shock about my left breast, spin 
like a top in the air, and come down in a heap. I 
know not how long before came the sounds 'Forward! 
Forward! Forward!' I rise on my elbow. Look! 
Look! There they go, all at breakneck speed, the 
bayonet at charge. The firing appears to suddenly 
cease for about five seconds. Then arose that do-or-die 
expression, that maniacal maelstrom of sound; that 
penetrating, rasping, shrieking, blood-curdling noise, 
that could be heard for miles on earth, and whose 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



15 



volumes reached the heavens; such an expression as 
never yet came from the throats of Mine men. l>ut from 
men whom the seething blast of an imaginary hell 
would not check while the sound lasted. 

" The battle of Chickamauga is won. 

" Dear Southern mother, that was the Rebel yell, 
and only such scenes ever did or ever will produce it. 

"Even when engaged, that expression from theCon- 
federate soldier always made my hair stand on end. 
The young nun and youths who composed this un- 
earthly music were lusty, jolly, clear-voiced, hardened 
soldiers, full of courage, and proud to march in rags, 
barefoot, dirty and hungry, with head erect to meet 
the plethoric ranks of the besl equipped and best fed 
army of modern times. Alas' now many of them are 
decrepit from ailment and age, and although we will 
never grow mid enough to cease being proud of the 
record of the Confederate soldier, and the dear old 
mothers who bore them, we can never again, even at 
your bidding, dear, dear mother, produce the Rebel 
yell. Never again : never, never, never." 



RELIGION IN THE SOUTHERN ARMY. 



JUDGE TURNEY ON" MR DAVIS. 



Tin: jurist's or/.v/o.v of the fallen < inrFTAiy. 



In a speech at ( darks vi lie. Ten n., Judge Turney said 
he did not care to make a speech except to keep him- 
self identified with the immortal idea of constitutional 
gO\ eminent. 

This was not altogether an occasion of mourning. 
The South had much to he thankful for, Her grand 
leader had lived long, enough to see the* intense- hatred 
and slander horn of the war pass away, and to know 
that the divisions among his own people were healed, 
and all believed that he acted upon conscientious and 
upright judgment. 

He spoke of Mr. Davis as a comrade as well as a 
.statesman. He had seen him risk his life on two 
battlefields. He remembered seeing him at the first 
Manassas, and he felt outraged that the great 
guiding brain of the Confederacy as he considered 
Mr. Davis, should take such risks. Again, when the 
noble Hatton fell Mr. Davis was on the field. He saw 
Hatton 's troops go into the fight, and, noting Hatton 
at its head, Mr. Davis said : "That brigade moves in 
handsomely, hut it will lose its commander." Mr. 
Davis thought for others but not for himself. 

He thought Mr Davis the ablest defender of consti- 
tutional law in the Union. From his sacrifice he 
could come to no other conclusion than that Mr. 
Davis believed in the justice of the South's cause as he 
believed in the Christian religion. He had absolutely 
no doubt of the right of a State to go out of the Union 
when the terms of the Union were violated. His 
State papers would live as long as Jefferson's. He was 
the equal of Jefferson, Calhoun and Webster, and 
superior to all who lived when he breathed his last. 
Mr. Davis was immortal. He would live while man- 
hood lasts. 



[From the New York Evangelist.] 

Dear Dr. Field: I have just read- your article on 
Stonewall Jackson in Harper's Magazine, and it is as 
if I had been to a good church service. Indeed, I 
could baldly have shed so many tears under a sermon. 
When you speak of the religious spirit in the South- 
ern army, it takes me hack to Dalton, and the great 
Johnston-Sherman campaign. That you can see the 
truth so clearly, through the many mystifying glasses 
through which you looked before coming face to face 
with us, amazes me when I read from your pen, that 
is always so kind and just. 

There has never been, even in the army of Crom- 
well or G ust a v us Adolphus. a stronger religious feeling 
than there was in the army under Joseph E.Johnf 
That great commander, who strengthened the con- 
fidence of his men while on retreat, was confirmed in 
the Episcopal Church by one of his Lieutenant Gen- 
erals, Bishop Polk. That day was a sort of half holi- 
day in the army. 

Hut it was to tell you of the experiences among the 
boy soldiers that I intended to write, and to tell you 
of my o\\ 11 personally. 

Late one afternoon 1 asked to go with me, to a se- 
cluded spot, a young comrade, who had been my 
schoolmate, classmate, and intimate associate, whose 
conversion a few days previous had causedhis face to 
be ihanged so that hg exhibited a meekness which 
was not natural to him. He was thoroughly convert- 
ed. 1 sought an interview with him, that I might get 
comfort. We left our place of conference just before 
dark, to go directly to tlfe night service. It was a new 
camp near Dal ton, and just before the beginning of 
that campaign of one hundred days' fighting over the 
one hundred miles back to Atlanta. 

After the sermon I was off in the dark in an agony 
of prayer that something would arouse me to realize 
the uncertainty of life. Mv friend had remained in 
the altar place, talking ami praying with penitents. 
Suddenly there came a heavy, dull thud, like the fall- 
ing of a tree in the forest, as indeed it was, an old oak 
that had been burned off at the roots. Rut the tragi- 
cal part of it was. that it struck in its fall a file of 
young ni( n who were in its path, of whom ten were 
killed by the stroke, anil lay dead in a row under the 
huge trunk. They were all bright young fellows, full 
of life and promise of the number was this life-long 
friend, whose sweetest counsel had been given me just 
before that service. I was his only watcher that night. 
Profanity, which is so common among soldiers, was 
almost entirely given up. There were no scoffers at 
the religion that had such a hold upon the army. 

Thank you, Dr. Field, for the tribute to Stonewall 
Jackson, and for all vour generous and courageous 
words about the South" ! S. A. C. 

• 

The above was written as a private letter. Its ap- 
pearance in print was a surprise, and this reproduc- 
tion is rather accidental. 



i6 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



The (Confederate *Jctevan. 

Fifty Cent* a Year. 8. A. CUNNINGHAM. Editor. 

Office at The American, Corner Church and Cherry 8ts. 

■ This publication Ib the personal property of S. A.Cunningham. 
Money paid for It docs not augment the Monument Fund directly, 
but as an auxiliary Its benefit cerlalnly makes It eminently worthy 
the patronaxe of every friend of the cause. 

Thk Confederate Veteran appears as an organ of 
all the brotherhood in the Southern States, and 
wherever else they may sojourn. It has for a leading 
object their complete organization into such enter- 
prises as will promote their general welfare. It will 
merit the co-operation and favor of every survivor of 
the Confederate service. It rises for duty. 

First, it is committed to a cause that should and 
will illustrate the undying devotion of the living to 
the memories of their sacred dead. The misfortunes 
of the struggle through those awful years of privation 
and trial, wherein some blamed others for failures 
that at last proved fatal to all, are remembered now 
with the utmost commiseration, and not only have 
controversies between generals ceased, but every true 
man is devoted to all of his fellows, and all alike 
revere devoutly the memory of our Chieftain, whose 
intelligence and devotion to principle caused him to 
suffer without murmur to the end. Since Mr. Davis' 
death the sentiment has grown to erect a memorial to 
liim at Richmond, where he is to be buried, at the 
request of his wife, and to make it typical of the 
Souths heroism and sacrifice. 



This issue of the CONFEDERATE VETERAN will give 
a sort of out outline of what it may be expected to 
contain. Some practical requests are male of every 
reader who desires to aid it. 

First — Consider its circulation, solicit subscribers, 
and send the money. There are club rates, so any 
one can get it free who will procure five others with as 
many half dollars. 

Second — Suggest to business men who want to reach 
the best people everywhere South that they advertise. 
The rate is low. It is an excellent medium to make 
known the merits of Southern literature. 

Third — Please examine the lists of contributors to 
the monument and report any errors. Maybe you 
can have names added; suggest some kind of enter- 
tainment to aid it. 

Again, look to the reports of Confederate monu- 
ments and supply any omission and correct any error. 
It is intended to republish and revise until this 
feature becomes a matter of much interest. 



Richmond has shown a very patriotic spirit in re- 
gard to the Davis monument. Early in the action of 
Southern people upon the subject, resolutions were 
adopted favorable to liberal action regardless of where 
the monument may be located. A subscription fund 
was started there and about $4,(XX) raised. It is 
understood that the city will supply not less than 
120,000, since the location has been given to Rich- 
mond. 



A revised list of the committees appointed by 
General Cabell for the States, etc., will be published 
February. It was not possible to get an accurate re- 
vision for this issue. 



In the preparation of this^first issue, under the se- 
rious disadvantage referred to elsewhere, it was decided 
to use a story of the battle of Franklin, under the 
heading, "Death of Gen. (). F Strahl," as it was 
mainly in type, but there was not room enough in the 
space assigned, and these notes are given: 

The author of the article, who is the editor of he 
Confederate Veteran, made a visit last Summer to 
Mrs. J. S. Sigler, near Hepler, Kansas, a favorite sister 
of Gen. Strahl, and learned, with much interest, de- 
tails of the life of the General. Inquiry was made of 
Mrs. Sigler as to her theory of why her brother, an 
Ohioan, could have become so enlisted for the South as 
to fight to his valiant death in her cause. The follow- 
ing explanation was given: His grandfather, Philip 
Strahl, married Miss Mary Lee, of Virginia, a sister of 
Jonathan Lee. She was a loyal Southerner, and a slave- 
holder. His maternal grandmother was a Miss Ander- 
son, of Baltimore. She, too, was a slave-holder 

The article as published on page :',1 is a carefully 
prepared account of S. A. Cunningham's experience, 
and what he saw. It lacks to complete it, as origi- 
nally published, the following: 

These personal recollections are all that I can give 
as the greater part of the battle was fought after night- 
fall, and once in the midst of it, with but the light of 
the flashing guns, I could see only what passed di- 
rectly under my own eyes. True, the moon was shin- 
ing; but the dense smoke and dust so filled the air as 
to weaken its benefits, like a heavy fog be/ore the rising 
sun, only there was no promise of the fog disappear- 
ing. Our spirits were crushed. It was indeed the 
Valley of Death. 

An earnest plea is made to every person who is 
friendly to this enterprise to do as quickly as practi- 
cable what is merited. Write to correct errors ■ n 
names of contributors and amounts immediately. If 
you like the publication and intend to subscribe, do 
so as speedily as possible. If you want to procure 
other subscribers, please attend to it right away. It 
is intended to furnish as complete list of Confederate 
monuments as it is possible to procure, giving descrip- 
tion and cost, and pictures occasionally. Please help 
in this. It is also intended to give as full accounts as 
possible of Confederate Homes. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



i7 



The fund aggregating nearly $1,800 raised by the 
Young Men's Democratic Club, of Nashville, is the 
largest yet furnished by any single orgtnization for 
the Davis monumenf. At first a ball was planned, 
but the management concluded a different sort of en- 
tertainment to be more fitting the cause. 

Then a "benefit" at the Vendome was undertaken, 
the leading feature of which was an address from 
Chief Justice, now Governor-elect Turney. Mrs. .1. 
W. Childress, Mrs. M. B. Pilcher, Miss White May, 
Mrs. A. H. Stewart and Miss Annie Brennan were the 
•committee of ladies. They were assisted by Mrs. John 
Overton, Mrs. H. W. Clark and Miss Henri Kwing. 

The club agreed in the outset to guarantee $500, hut 
when they got to work they far exceeded that amount, 
as the following statement will show: John 11. 
Reeves, manager, became responsible for HHi tickets at 
♦1. Thomas J. Ryan took a like number. John P. 
Hickman, Jesse Johnson, (has. E. Curry, Allen G. 
Hall, W. L. Cranberry, ('has. A. Miller each took 50 
tickets in like manner. Jesse Johnson and John P. 
Hickman sold many more than their fifty each. Then 
W. (). Vertrees, W. T. Smith. T. J. Slowey, E. M. 
Carell, P. F. deary. Jr., J. F. Lipscomb, D. B. Cooper. 
J. W. Childress, Chas. Sykes. C. P. McCarvcr, G. 11 
Armistead, E. YV. Carmack and M, A. Consadine each 
took 25, and Jere Baxter bought $250 worth. Main 
others deserve mention. l»ut these comdrise the com- 
mittess. That entertainment may be referred to as a 
model. The net receipts, it is believed, are in excess 
of any entertainment ever given in Nashville in one 
evening for any charitable purpi 

The Cumberland Almanac for 1893 appears with the 

opening day of the year, under the careful and ex- 
cellent supervision of Mr. YV. H. Trafford. The Cum- 
berland Almanac is the property of the Nashville 
American. It is sixty-two years old, and has had a 
fine reputation for a half century. The present issue 
is nearly twice as large as its predecessors, and it has 
an extensive collection of interesting data and is, per- 
haps, as accurate as can be found in any periodical of 
the kind. The liberal and patriotic act of devoting a 
page to the Davis monument and Confederate Vet- 
bran is acknowledged. 

In Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, there is an 
irregular-shaped, small spot of ground, enclosed with 
a neat iron fence. On the gate is the name "Jefferson 
Davis," and on the marble headstone is engraved: 

JOSEPH, 
Soil of Our Beloved President 

JEFFKR90N DAVIS. 

F.reeted by the Little (ilrls and Boys of the Southern Capital. 

It will be recalled by the older people that the lad 
lost bis life by falling from a window of the Confed- 
erate " White House," during the war. 

The camp that will send 100 subscriptions can have 
appropriated one column in its interest this year. 



Col. Wells H. Blodoett, of St. Louis, who saw 
much of Mr. Lincoln before he became President, tells 
this funny story: Mr. Lincoln was sitting in the- 
office of his friends, Judd & Blodgett, in which young 
Blodgett was reading law. When Mr. Judd asked him 
if he was going to the National Convention, he said : 
"Well, Judd, I do not know; I am almost too much 
of a candidate to go, and hardly candidate enough to 
stay away." It was the convention thatmominated him. 

Col. Wm. Henry Stewart, of Norfolk, who did 
much gallant service in the intersectional war, pub- 
lishes an account of the battles and engagements 
where he took part. The narrative, while generally 
interesting, will amaze those who have not had ex- 
perience at man's capacity for endurance. His great 
grandfather, Charles Stewart, was an officer from Vir- 
ginia in the Colonial army of the American Reso- 
lution. His story of the battle of "the Crater" will 
have attention in our next issue. 



A MOVEMENT has been inaugurated in Washington 
( 'ity for holding a series of entertainments in aid of a 
fund for the establishment of a Confederate Veterans' 
Home in Washington. Col. M. S. Thompson, of the 
Confederate Veterans' Association, called to order the 
assembly, consisting mostly of ladies, and explained 
the object of the meeting. It was in furtherance, he 
sa,id, of a plan proposed some time ago to erect a home 
for Confederate soldiers and their widows in Wash- 
ington. 

Rout. I.. Travlor, Esq., of Richmond, has been so 
thoughtful in behalf of the Confederate Veteran 
that acknowlegment must he given. Mr. Travlor is 
a native Virginian, but resided in Tennessee by the 
great river long enough to capture one of our loveliest 
women. He is diligent, as he has opportunity, in col- 
lecting rare volumes and curios. He has perhaps the 
finest collection of autograph letters of eminent men 
of all nations and generations to be found in the 
South. He had the special good fortune to get an 
original daguerreotype of Edgar Allan Poe, which is 
believed to be his last portrait, and the only one of 
him known to be in existence which has never been 
reproduced. It was taken at the gallery of Pratt, of 
Richmond (builder of the unique structure known as 
Pratt's Castle), and was presented by Poe but a short 
time before his death to Mrs. Sarah Elmira (Royster) 
Shelton, whom he had engaged to marry. The pur- 
pose of a trip to the North, undertaken by him about 
that time, was to complete arrangements for his wed- 
ding to that lady. On his way to New York he was 
seized at Baltimore by the illness which resulted 
fatally Oct. 7, 1849. The portrait was treasured jealously 
by Mrs. Shelton until a few years since, when it came 
into the possession of Mr. Traylor. He has refused 
$1,000 for it. It is not for sale. 



i8 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



THE OLD VIRGINIA TOWN, LEXINGTON. 



Willi-.}- I.l.i AND STONEWALL JACESON ARE BURIED- 

RBMXNIBCENCBa "F STONEWALL JACXSON, 

BY DR. J. WM. JONES. 



Lexington, Va., is the mosl interesting town of it- 
size in the South. The Washington-Lee University 
founded by the "father of his country " and presided 
over by Robert K. Lee, when he surrendered life's 
duties, i- tin- most prominent and conspicuous institu- 
tion of the place. It ha- a beautiful chapel, across the 
campus from the University main building, in whirl, 
the body of Gen. Lee rest-, and over which is that life- 
like work of Edward V. Valentine, representing, in 
white marble, the soldier and Christian as if asleep on 
hi- couch. The old'mansion in which Gen. Lee re- 
sided is near by, and it is the residence of Gen. Curtis 
Lee, his son, and successor as President of the Univer- 
sity. It is the family residence as well, the daughters 
residing there 

The Virginia Military Institute grounds adjoin 
those of the Washington-Lee University, and are en- 
tered through its campus. Thisold place, with its an- 
cient cannon ornamenting the grounds, was especially 
interesting on the occasion of the visit which induces 
thi< article, for it was in honor of its President, who 
went tn the front with its corps of cadets in L861, and 
never returned until he had "crossed over the river," 
honored second to no soldier hero of any country or 
time. 

This writing is from memory of an only visit made 
there .Inly 21, 1891, an account of which was written 
at the time hut never published, and the copy lost. 

The l.ee- wire all at home and cordially interested 
in honoring the memory of (Jen. Thos. .1. Jackson. It 
was the greatest day in the history of old Lexington, 
for the attendance was much larger than that when 
the formal presentation of the recumbent figure of 
(ion, Lee occurred 

A superb colossal bronze statue of Stonewall .lack- 
son had been provided, and his body had been re- 
moved from the original family lot to the central cir- 
cle in the old cemetery of the town, and the bronze 
figure <it is also by Mr. Valentine) was in position. 

The principal ceremonies were had under the broad 
shades of the University campus, some half a mile 
away, at the conclusion of which the great procession, 
numbering perhaps i>(mkiii, passed through the main 
streets and near the old church, where Jackson taught 
his Negro Sunday-school. The military — infantry, 
cavalry and artillery — passed by the cemetery and 
formed on an adjacent slope in rear. 

By the statue, still under a white mantle, there was 
a platform -covered in while bunting, upon which 
Mrs. Jackson ascended, taking her two grand-children 
with her. She was dressed in black, her heavy black 
veil thrown over her shoulders, and the noble face 



giving cheer to the little children who were to pull the 
-I'd. Both children were dressed in white, their 

white face- and waxen curls producing the strongest 

contrast with tie- devoted widow of Stonewall Jack- 
SOn. The writer occupied a position that could not 
have been improved for the sight and. meditating 
upon it all. he thought much of whether he would not 
give his life, it' by so doing all the South could have 
the comfort of the BCene. 

' At the signal little Julia Jackson Christian pulled 
the cord, and the magnificent figure of the Christian 
soldier stood- as if in life, mid the shouts of thousands 
w ho followed him to the death, ami other thousands 
of women, maidens ami young men who had grown 
up in the faith that a greater soldier than Stonewall 
.lack-on had never gone to battle. The bright child 
who exclaimed "I vinderveiled it." was frightened by 
the noise of cannon, musketry and human voice.- that 
followed her act. 

The hospitality of the people was remarkable. The 
pride and gratitude that their little town among the 
hills was the home and the burial place of Lee and 
Jackson was enough to bestir the entire people to the 
utmost to make every visitor a guest. The writer was 
fortunately assigned to the delightful home of Mr. 
McDowell! 

Every old soldier present must have wished that he 
had served under Stonewall Jackson. The negro men 
of the town who had the honor of being taught by 
him in his Sunday-school, wherr boys, were proud of 
it. One practical old man of the town, in comment- 
ing upon him as teacher at the Institute, said he was 
never proud of him until the Sunday that he started 
for the war. Then, dressed in military uniform, with 
spurs and on horseback, he seemed to be exactly in the 
proper place. 

1)R. .1. WM. JiiNK.s' RECOLLECTIONS OF STONEWALL JACKSON. 

It seems fitting in this connection to give reminis- 
cences of Gen. Jackson, by Dr. J. YVm. Jones, who was 
first to write and commend the CONFEDERATE Ykt- 
BRAN through its prospectus. It was written at the 
time referred to above for the Atlanta Journal: 

I have to-day, after a lapse of thirty years, a very 
vivid recollection of his appearance, and how- he im- 
pressed inc. 

Dressed in a simple Virginia uniform, apparently 
about 37 years old, six feet high, medium size, gray 
eves that seemed to look through you, 'light brown 
hair, and a countenance in which deep benevolence 
seemed mingled with uncompromising sternness, he 
impressed me as having about him nothing at all of 
"the pomp and circumstance" of war, but every ele- 
ment which enters into the skillful leader, and the in- 
domitable, energetic soldier, who was always ready for 
the tight. 

At First Manassas Jackson won the sobriquet of 
"Stonewall." which has supplanted his proper name, 
and will cleave to him forever. 

The chivalricand heroic Bee, who had been steadily 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



19 



borne bactk all of the morning, and his little handful 
■of brave fellows nearly swept away by the blue waves 
which threatened to overwhelm everything before 
them, rode up to Jackson and exclaimed almost in 
despair: "General, they are beating us back." "No, 
sir," said Jackson, his eves fairly glittering beneath 
the rim of his old cadet cap, "they shall not beat us 
back. We will give them the bayonet." 

It was then that Bee, about to yield up his noble 
life, galloped back to the scattered remnant of his 
command and rallied them by exclaiming: "Here 
.stands Jackson like a stone wall! Rally behind the 
Virginians! Let us determine to die here and we 
shall conquer!" 

And thus was the name of the heroic Bee linked 
forever with that of " Stonewall " — 

"One of the few immortal names, 
That \v<*re not born to die." 

But thr soubriquet given was as inappropriate as 
can be imagined. Jackson was more like a cyclone, a 

tornado, a hurricane, than a stone wall. 

Jackson was accustomed to keep his plans secret 
from his stall' and his higher officers as well as from 
the people, ami once said : if I ran deceive our own 
people I will be sure to deceive the enemy as to my 
plans." 

It was a very common remark in his corps: "If 
the Yankees are as ignorant of this move as we are 
old Jack has them." 

His QUICK DECISION \M> I uisr ORDERS. 

Ja.kson was noted for the quickness with which he 
decided what to do, and his short, crisp orders on the 
battlefield. 

I happened to be sitting on my horse near by, when 
Col. A. S. Pendleton, of Jackson's staff, rode up to 
Gen. Early, at Cedar Run. and touching his hat quiet- 
lv said: "Gen. Jackson sends compliments to Gen. 
Early and says advance on the enemy and you will 
be supported by Gen. Winder." 

"(ien. Early's compliments to (ien. Jackson, and 
tell him I will do it." was the laconic reply, and thus 
the battle opened. 

On the eve of another battle a staff officer rode up 
to Jackson and said: "(ien. Ewell sends his compli- 
ments anil says he is read v." "(ien. Jackson's com- 
pliments to (ien Ewell am! tell him to proceed," was 
the quiet reply. And Boon the noise of the conflict 
was beard. At Cold Harbor, on the memorable 27th 
of June, 1861, after he had gotten his corps in position, 
the great chieftain spent a few moments in earnest 
prayer, and then said quietly to one of his staff: 
"Tell Gen. Ewell to drive the enemy." Soon the ter- 
rible shock was joined, and he sat quietly on his sor- 
rel sucking a lemon and watching through his glasses 
the progress of the fight. Presently a staff officer of 
Gen. Ewell galloped up and exclaimed : "(ien. Ewell 
says, sir, that it is almost impossible for him to ad- 
vance further unless the battery (pointing to it) is 
silenced." "Go tell Major Andrews to bring sixteen 
pieces of artillery to bear on that battery and silence 
it immediately," was the prompt reply. 

Soon the battery wa< silenced. " Now," he said, 
"tell Gen. Ewell to drive them," and right nobly did 
Ewell and his gallant men obey the order. When on 
his great flank movement at Chancellorsville, Gen. 
Eitz Lee "sent for him to ascend a hill from which he 
could view the enemy's position, he merely glanced at 



it once, when he formed his plan and said quickly to 
an aide: "Tell my column to cross that road." 

Just before he was wounded at Chancellorsville he 
gave to A. P. Hill the order, "Press them and cut 
them off from the United States ford," and as he was 
borne off the field bleeding, mangled and fainting, he 
roused himself to give, with something of his old fire, 
his last order, "Gen. Pendleton, you must hold your 
position." 

ms Ricin. DISCIPLINE. 

He was very stern and rigid in his discipline, and 
would not tolerate for a moment the slightest devia- 
tion from the letter of his orders. He put Gen. Gar- 
nett under arrest for ordering a retreat at Kernstown. 
although his ammunition was exhausted and his bri- 
gade was about to be surrounded, preferred charges 
against him, and was prosecuting them with utmost 
rigor when the ( bancellorsville campaign opened. He 
insisted that Gen. (iarnett should have held his 
position with the bayonet; that the enemy would 
have retreated if be had not, and that under no cir- 
cumstances should Garnett have fallen back without 
orders from him (Jackson) After the death of Jack- 
son, (ien. Lee. without further trial of the case, re- 
stored (ien. (iarnett to the command of his brigade. 
and this brave soldier fell in in the foremost of Pick- 
ett's famous charge on the heights of Gettysburg. A. 
brigadier once galloped up to Jackson in tlie midst of 
battle, and said : "(ien. Jackson, did you order me to 
charge that battery?" pointing to it, "Yes, sir. I did. 
Have you obeyed the order ; " " Why, no, general ; I 
thought there must be some mistake. My brigade 
would lie annihilated, literally annihilated, sir, it we 

should move across that field." "Gen. ." said 

Jackson, bis eyes flashing tire and his voice and man- 
ner betraying excitement and even rage, "I always try 
to take care of my wounded and bury my dead. Obey 
that order, sir, and do it at once." 

I heard one day, on the Valley campaign, a colloquy 
between Jackson and a colonel commanding one of 
his brigades Jackson said quietly: "1 thought, 

Col. , that the orders were tor you to move in the 

rear instead of in the front of (ien. Elzcy's brigade 
this morning." " Yes, I know that, general ; but my 
fellows were ready before Elzey's, and 1 thought it 
would be bad to keep them waiting, and that it really 
made no difference anyhow." " 1 want you to under- 
stand, colonel." was the almost fierce reply," that you 
must obey my orders first and reason about them 
afterwards". Consider yourself under arrest, sir, and 
march to the rear of'your brigade." Jackson put 
(ien. A. P. Hill under "arrest (for a cause that was 
manifestly unjust) on the second Manassas campaign, 
and be probably put more officers under arrest than 
all other of our generals combined. There is no doubt 
that Jackson was sometimes, too severe, and that he 
was not alwavs just, and yet it would have greatly in- 
creased the discipline and efficiency of our service if 
others of our Confederate leaders had had more of this 
sternness and severity towards delinquents. 

HIS ATTENTION TO MINI'TK DETAILS. 

He was unceasingly active in giving his personal at- 
tention to the minutest details. He hail an interview 
with his quartermaster, his commissary, his ordinance 
and his medical officer every day, and he was at all 
times thoroughly familiar with the condition of these 
departments. It is a remarkable fact that, despite his 



20 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



rapid marches, he rarely ever destroyed any public 
property, or left so much as a wagon wheel to the 
enemy. 

Not content with simply learning what his maps 
could teach him of the country and its topography 
he was accustomed to have frequent interviews with 
citizens, and to reconnoitre personally the country 
through which he expected to move, as well as the 
ground on which he expected to fight. Being called 
to his quarters one day to give him some information 
concerning a region with which I had been familiar 
from boyhood, I soon found out that he knew more 
about its topography than I did, and I was constrained 
to say, "Excuse me, General, I have known this 
section all my life, and thought I knew all about it; 
but it is evident that you know more about it than I 
do, and that I can give you no information at all." 

Often at night, when the army was wrapped in sleep, 
he would ride out alone to inspect roads by which, on 
the morrow he expected to move, to strike the enemy 
in flank or rear. 

After all the crowning glory of Jackson, as it was 
;il<o of Lee, was his humble, simple-hearted piety, his 
tirin trust in Christ as his personal Savior, his godly 
walk ami conversation, and his life of active effort for 
the good of others. * * * * Suffice it to say, that 
as I saw him frequently at preaching or at the prayer- 
meeting drinking in the simple truths of the gospel, 
beard him lead the devotions of his ragged followers 
in pravcrs that I have rarely heard equalled and never 
surpassed in fervid appropriateness, knew of his active 
efforts for the spiritual good of the soldiers, and con- 
versed with him on the subject of personal religion, I 
was fully (satisfied that this stem soldier not only de- 
serves a'plaee beside Col. Gardner, and Gen. Hancock, 
and Capt. Vicars, and other Christian soldiers of the 
century, but that the world has never seen an unin- 
spired man who deserves higher rank as a true Chris- 
tian. 

I recall here just two incidents. In the early spring 
of 18(13 I was one day walking from our camp to a 
meeting of our chaplains' association, when I heard 
the clatter of horses' hoofs behind me, and, turning 
my head, recognized (Jen. Jackson riding along as was 
his frequent custom. As he came up we saluted, and 
he asked if. 1 was going to the chaplains' meeting, 
and, receiving an affirmative response, he at once dis- 
mounted and, throwing his bridle over his arm, 
walked with me about two miles. 

I shall never forget that walk of the humble preach- 
er with the great soldier. Military matters were rare- 
lv alluded to, and when 1 would introduce them he 
would promptly change the conversation. We talked 
of the recently organ i zee I chaplains' association, and 
how to make it more efficient; of the need of more 
chaplains and other preache*s in the army, and how- 
to secure them ; of the best way of procuring and cir- 
culating Hibles and religious literature; of certain 
officers and men in whose salvation he felt peculiar in- 
terest, and for whom he asked that I would join him 
in special prayer and effort ; of the necessity of having 
chaplains stick to the post of duty even more faith- 
fully than other officers and men, and other kin- 
dred topics. And then we got on the subject of per- 
sonal piety, the obstacles to its growth in the army 
and the best means of overcoming them, and as he 
quoted readily, and applied aptly some of the most 
precious promises of (Jod's word, I almost imagined 



that I was talking, instead of to this grim son of Mars,, 
to one of the grand old preachers of the olden time 
who knew nothing about " new theology," but was 
content to follow implicitly the word of (Jod, and to 
sing with the spirit and the understanding. 

I may now barely allude to his glorious death, the 
logical sequence to his noble life of simple trust and 
self-sacrificing toil in the vineyard of the Lord. Cut 
down in the execution of what he regarded as the 
most successful military movement of his life, shot by 
his own men, who would have died rather than will- 
ingly harmed a button on his old gray coat, his bril- 
liant career ended in the full tide of his ambitions 
and hopes of future service for the land and cause he 
loved so well,' he could yet calmly say to weeping 
friends who stood around. " It is ail right. 1 would 
not have it otherwise if I could. I had hoped to live 
to serve my country, but it will be infinite gain to be 
transplanted and live, with Christ," And in his de- 
lirium, after saving with the old fire of battle, " Pass 
the infantry rapidly to the front," "Tell A. P. Hill to- 
prepare for action," "Tell Major Hawkins to send for- 
ward rations for the men," a peaceful smile passed 
over his placid countenance, and his last words were, 
" Let us cross over the river and rest under the shade 
of the trees." 

And this great man died! Nay, he did not die! 
The weary worn marcher went into bivouac — the hero- 
of a hundred battles won his last victory, and went 
to wear his "crown of rejoicing," his fadeless laurels 
of honor, and heaven and earth alike have echoed the 
plaudit: 

"Servant of (iod, well done ; 

Rest from thy loved employ. 
The battle's fought, the victory's won. 

Enter thy Master's Joy !" 



THE CONFEDERATE MEMORIAL DAY 



HOW THE MOVEMENT, STARTED SOUTH, CAUSED THE 
NATIONAL EVENT IN HONOR OF SOLDIER DEAD. 



Many Southern people do not enjoy, as they de- 
serve, the knowledge that our women started the 
movement which gives a National holiday of May 30. 
It is decoration day for the graves of all Union 
soldiers. 

The widow of (Jen. John A. Logan told how it 
came about in a letter of May 14, 1892, to the New 
York Mail and Express. (Jen. Logan was the second 
Commander of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

HOW T1IK FIRST SUGGESTION WAS MADE. 

In the letter referred to Mrs. Logan states : " During 
the winter preceding the order Mr. Charles L. Wilson, 
of Chicago, invited (Jen. Logan and myself to ac- 
company him and some fronds to visit the battlefields- 
and fortifications around Richmond, Petersburg and 
their vicinities. The political situation in the House 
of Representatives touching reconstruction, impeach- 
ment of Mr. Johnson, and such questions, was such 
that he would not go away, but I did go with them. 
* * * * j n telling Gen. Logan of what we had 
seen we mentioned that we had been much impressed 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



21 



by seeing -the graves of the Confederate dead all 
marked by little white flags, faded wreaths of laurel, 
and such tributes to their memory, that had been 
placed there by their friends. His tender heart was 
deeply touched. He said it was most fitting;, that 
the ancients, especially the Greeks, hail honored their 
dead, particularly their heroes, by chaplets of laurel 
and flowers, and that he intended to issue an order 
designating a day for decorating the grave of every 
soldier in this land, and if he could he would have it 
made a National holiday. 

"He issued the order and secured an appropriation 
of money to preserve the proceedings of the first Memo- 
rial day, which were compiled from the reports that 
weir sent to the headquarters of the Grand Army. 
But. owing to the voluminous character of these pro- 
ceedings, I think hut one volume entitled " Memorial 
Day" was ever published by Congress. These records 
have been left to each State to take such action as 
they desired in the matter, consequently they are 
very incomplete. * * * * The order is so elo- 
quent in its appeal for its perpetuity that we are sure 
it will be observed as long as tin- is a tree and grateful 
nation. 

" He appealed to the ex-soldiers and sailors all over 
the country to join the organization, lie interested 
many prominent officers, who promised active co- 
operation in their States, that the veterans might be 
banded together in some common interest that would 
insure assistance when any of them was in trouble, 
and would commemorate the deeds of both the living 
and the dead. He was always thinking of something 
for the benefit of the men who had served their 
country." 

In concluding a long order. Gen. Logan said: 

"Let no wanton foot tread rudely on such hallowed 
grounds. Let pleasant paths invite the coming and 
going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no 
vandalism of avarice or neglect, no ravages of time 
testify to the present or to the coming generations that 
we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and 
undivided republic. If other eves grow dull, other 
hands slack and other hearts cold in the solemn trust, 
ours shall keep it well as long as the light and warmth 
of life remain to us. 

"Let us, then, at time of appointment, gather round 
their sacred remains, and garland the passionless 
mounds above them with the choicest flowers of spring 
time. * * * * Let us in this solemn presence 
renew our pledges to aid and assist those whom they. 
have left among us, a sacred charge upon a nation's 
gratitude — the soldier's and sailor's widow and 
orphan. 

"It is the pleasure of the Commander-in-Chief to 
inaugurate this observance with the hope that it will 
be kept up from vear to year while a survivor of the 
war remains to honor the memory of his departed 
comrades. He earnestly desires the public press to 
lend its friendly aid in bringing this order to the 
notice of comrades in all parts of the country in time 
for simultaneous compliance therewith." 



The foregoing suggests. the fitness of the assertion 
that in all the thirty years no Southern man has ever 
been irreverent at the graves of Union soldiers. Con- 
federates have often helped to strew flowers and oth- 
erwise honor the brave men who fell in battle for the 
Union. 

COysiDERATIOX FOR OLD SOLDIERS 



Mrs. M. Louise Myrick, of Americus. Ga., whose 
father. Col. Seudder. a Tennessean, lost an eye in 
Mexico, and whose uncle. Gen. B. Davidson, was a 
well-known Confederate, concludes an article about 
soldiers in this way : 

To my thinking, nothing is too good for the old sol- 
lier. He should be crowned with every available 
honor, ami if there are any soft places in the rank- of 
business, gratefully bestow them upon him. Whether 

they wore the blue or the gray, true SOldierS deserve to 

be honored by this generation, who now live in peace 
and prosperity. 

The common soldier who fought and spilled his 
blood in the defense of the South can hope for no 
comforting government pension. If in need or dis- 
tress, hi- only source of relief in bis declining years 
must come from sympathetic and generous voting 
Southern men. who arc bound by the ties of blood and 
memories ever sacred, to the Old South, which pro- 
duced some of the most chivalric spirits that ever left 
an impress upon a nation's history. 

To the dead we owe a more sacred duty. Their 
memory should ever be kept fresh and green. The 
noble women of this broad land will remain faithful 
to this (rust. They will teach their children to per- 
petuate the beautiful memorial custom. When the 
faithful of this age are silent in death, generations yel 
unborn will be found ready to don the mantle of pa- 
triotism so honorably worn by their mothers and 
grandmothers. 

Yes. there will ever be patriotic women, who will 
wreathe ill garlands nature's choicest offerings, the 
laurel and the rose, with which to cover the mounds 
of the heroic dead. 

The time-honored custom will live as long as lasts 
the country that holds tin 1 sacred dust, and as the 
South grows richer, shining shafts of marble will be 
raised in every lodge and hamlet, emblazoned with 
golden inscriptions for those whose lives of sacrifice 
are now a blessed memory. 



Ohio's MoNIWIK.NT AT THE WoRI.n's FaIU — The Ohio 
monument, in honor of Ohio's heroes in civil and 
military life, will be one of the attractions of the 
World's Fair. It will stand in front of the Ohio 
building, ami. when dedicated, ex-President Have- 
will deliver the oration. It represents Ohio standing 
proudly above the sculptured features of six eminent 
sons and saying, " These are my jewels." The figures 
ure of (irant, Garfield, Sherman, Chase, Stanton, Sher- 
idan. The sculptor is Levi T. Schofield, an architect 
of Cleveland, and the State of Ohio pays him 125,000 
for the work. The height of the entire monument 'is 
31 feet, the Ohio figure being 10 feet, and the figures 
below each being over 7 feet high. After the Fair the 
monument will be placed in the State-house at 
Columbus, ( ). 



22 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



WHITE HOI'SE OF THE CONFEDERACY. 



PROPERTY OF THE CITY OF RICHMOND— HOW TO BE 
UTILIZED. 



Miss Clara Reese, in the Pittsburg Commercial, gives 
the following description of the Jefferson Davis man- 
sion at Richmond, as it appeared recently : 

Unlike many buildings of historic interest, the 
Davis mansion has much to reward the visitor. The 
building, a square three-storied structure, with a base- 
ment of half story above the ground, is of smooth, 
gray stone, and stands out directly on the street, the 
pavement in front shaded by three thick trees. A 
flight of eight stone steps, these worn in hollows by 
the tramp of seventy-five years, lead up to the main 
doorway, the small portico of which is guarded by two 
slenderpillars. An outer reception hall leads into a 
still larger one, this in its turn opening upon a wide 
porch, which runs the entire rear of the building, and 
from which eight gigantic pillars, with circumference 
as great as the large timber wheels used in hauling 
from the Pittsburg mills, reach upward to the roof, 
which stands outward above the highest story. It is 
from this porch the 11-vear-old son of Mr. Davis fell 
and broke his neck. The distance is probably twelve 
feet to the ground. The porch looks out upon a grass- 
grown yard, enclosed by a high brick fence newly 
whitewashed. The yard is shaded by a number of 
trees — horse chestnut, English walnut, magnolia and 
•evergreen. 

VIEW OF THE INTERIOR. 

From the reception hall, which looks out upon this 
porch, three doois open into large apartments, now 
used as school-rooms. Doors are brown with age. The 
double-doors to the right arc carved in the Grecian pat- 
tern. Floors are finished iji hard pine, walls have all 
had their special tint of paint, and the ceilings are 
all richly ornamented with stucco-work. Pieces of 
this ornamentation have fallen off, but in the pristine 
beauty the effect must have been elaborate. On state 
occasions it is presumable that the doors of these 
apartments were thrown open into the reception room, 
now used as the principal's office. 

In the first reception hall are two alcoves, each con- 
taining a bronze figure, life size. One figure represents 
Ceres and one Comus. To the right a winding stair- 
way reaches to the upper floors. Two alcoves are in 
the wall along the line of stairway, these probably 
adorned in the past by statues. Banisters are plain, 
but along the Hat ends of the stairs runs a vine of con- 
ventionalized flowers and leaves and the base of the 
stairway supports a pillar for the illumination, lamp 
at first, at present gas. The private office of Mr. 
Davis is still further to the right of the stairway. It 
is a small apartment. A marble mantle of plain con- 
struction has a place, the only mantle at present in 
the building. There are probably twenty apartments 
beside hallways, large closets, basement and observa- 
tory. Rooms are all large and well lighted. Win- 
dows, though sinall-paned, arc generous in size, those 
in the rear of the first floor extending almost from 
•ceiling to floor. There are inside shutters to all the 
windows, and from the observatory a fine view may 
be had over the city. On the whole, in spite of the 
wear and tear of seventy-five years, the mansion is 
still in comfortable and habitable condition, and the 
ladies of Richmond arc deserving of the highest praise 



for their laudable intention to keep intact the historic 
landmark, one certainly dear to every loyal Southern 
heart. 

A DREAM IN MARBLE. 

Miss Reese gives the following description of two 
old mantels that have been secured by a gentleman in 
the vicinity of the mansion: 

The mantels are of good, though not exaggerated 
height, the shelves are wide and perfectly plain, and 
the ornamental work down each side of the fire-place 
rests on a plain, substantial base. The whole beauty 
lies in the perpendicular supports from shelf to base, 
and the horizontal panels directly over the fire-place. 
The horizontal panels are in has relief, and as deli- 
cately chiseled as a cameo, while the side-pieces are 
carved to stand out almost to the depth of tree pieces 
of statuarv. On one mantel the side pieces represent 
Cupid and Psyche. The figures are in kneeling post- 
ures upon an ornamental piece of carving resembling 
a leaf-cushioned trunk of a tree, and occupy the full 
space between this and. the mantel-shelf. Cupid on 
the right-hand panel has just shot an arrow from his 
bow, and is intently watching its destination. His 
long curls hang gracefully, the poise of the kneeling 
figure is admirable, while the dimples of hand and 
feet and the curves of the figure are artistic and ex- 
quisite. On the other upright panel Psyche has 
caught the arrow upon her knee, and grasps it won- 
deringly. The lines of drapery, the delicately chiseled 
features, the curves of throat and shoulders, the 
rounded arms, the posture, are indicative of the skill 
which guided the hand of the sculptor. 

The horizontal panel in its delicate, pure, cameo- 
like outlines, represents the familiar picture of " Au- 
rora,'' or the "Coming of the Morning." Clouds form 
the misty base. A beautiful maiden is in advance of 
the chariot and its attendants, a dancing circle of 
cloud nymphs, and scatters blossoms above the sleep- 
ing earth. The chariot is drawn by three magnificent 
horses, and above flies the winged herald of the com- 
ing. 

The second mantel is also a dream in marble. On 
one of its upright sections stands out almost in free 
relief the exquisitely-chiseled figure of Hebe, the cup- 
bearer, and on the other that of Niobe, the figures 
standing. Hebe carries low in one hand a pitcher, 
and in the other, partly outstretched, the cup. The 
poise of the head, the grace and dignity of the figure, 
and the outline of the body, as expressed through the 
delicacy of the drapery, gives to the whole an exqui- 
site beauty. The figure of Niobe is likewise a dainty 
and exquisite piece of chiselled work. Draperies are 
scanty, and the dimpled curves of the graceful figure 
are wondrously chaste and beautiful. 

The horizontal panel represents Apollo in his char- 
iot in the heavens. Three horses draw the car of the 
god, their proportions suggestive of strength, while 
the god, with arms outstretched, grasping the reins, 
which are at t heir highest tension, stands out in relief, 
strong, and magnificent. The horizontal panels could 
be easily removed from their places and form has re- 
lief slabs, fit to grace the finest art museum in the 
land. 

CONFEDERATE MEMORIAL SOCIETY. 

The ladies have banded themselves together under 
the name of the Confederate Memorial Literary 
Society, with Mrs. J. Taylor Ellyson, wife of Mayor 



CONEEDERATE VETERAN. 



23 



Ellyson, chairman of the permanent Museum Com- 
mittee. They were obliged to insert the word •■liter- 
ary" in the name of the organization for charter pur- 
poses. The women have a strong organization in 
Richmond, known as the Hollywood Memorial Asso- 
ciation, whose object is to keep in constant trim the 
cemeteries of the Confederate dead. It is this body 
that made application for the mansion and expected 
simply to make the new work a department of Holly- 
wood.' Technicalities of law, however, required an- 
other name, though practically the two bodies are the 
same. The strength and devotion of the Hollywood 
Association, whose record for thorough work lias long 
since been made, is assurance of the Zealand devotion 
t<> come in the prosecution of the new work. 

"The object of the ladies," Said Mrs. Kllyson, " is 
to restore the mansion as far as practicable to the exact 
condition in which it was left by President Davis, 
ami to establish a permanent museum of Confederate 
relics. We have appealed to our sisters throughout 
the South, and expect that branch organizations will 
lie formed among them, whose object will be to secure 
valuable Confederate mementos A regent will be 
established in each State, and our plans are to give to 
each Southern State a room of its own, where it may 
deposit and arrange its own mementos. Young peo- 
ple's auxiliaries are also to he formed to assist in the 
work. We have no fund yet, but expect to have one 
soon by gifts, and through the giving of entertain- 
ments. We have already held entertainments 'with 
success. It is not our intention to buy relics. We 
think that the sentiment of the South will be all-suffi- 
cient to turn into the safe-keeping of a chartered insti- 
tution the sacred mementos of the dead. We have 
already the promise of several pieces of furniture that 
formerly-graced- the Confederate White -House,- and a 
number of letters notifying of keepsakes that will 
gladly be turned over — clothes, arms, money, and other 
belongings — as soon as we are ready for them. The 
glory, the hardships, and the heroism of the war are a 
noble heritage for our children. To keep green such 
memories, and to commemorate such virtues it is our 
purpose to gather together and preserve in the Execu- 
tive Mansion of the Confederacy the sacred relics ot 
those glorious days." 

BLUE AND GRAY AT CHICAGO. 

Publication has been made that there will be a 
grand reunion of the old soldiers of the country at 
Chicago next summer. The notice is as follows: 

The World's Fair managers and the leading 0. A.R. 
men of Chicago, and the best business men of that 
city heartily approve of the reunion, and will assist in 
the matter. A committee, consisting of the leading 
ex-soldiers of the G. A. R. were selected to have charge 
of the work at Chicago, 'and a like committee will as- 
sist them, composed of the ex-Confederate soldiers 
living in Chicago. They are all well-known business 
men. The reunion is now an assured success, and the 
old veterans of the North and South, who faced each 
other on so many battle-fields, will meet in peaceful 
reunion, to talk over their old battles and attend the 
World's Fair together. 

On May 30, 1893, there will be a grand union mem- 
orial service held, and the blue and gray will decorate 
with (lowers the graves' of the 6,000 Confederate sol- 
diers buried at Oakwood Cemetery, Chicago, and the 
graves of the Union soldiers buried there. 



There will be a National Committee who will assist 
the committee at Chicago in this reunion. Tents will 
be furnished by the Covernment to camp in, and the 
iild boys who wore the blue and the gray can go into 
camp by States, and have one good time together 
before they pitch their tents beyond the silent river. 
There are hundreds all over the land who wore the 
blue and the gray, the best men. both North and 
South, who arc offering their services to make this the 
greatest reunion ever held on American soil » 

A mass meeting of the survivors will be held during 
the encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic 
at Detroit, Mich., to boom this reunion. All true sol- 
diers who wore the blue or the gray are invited to this 
meeting, and to the grand reunion at Chicago in 1893. 



THE "ORPHAN BRIGADE.'' 



The First Brigade of Kentucky Infantry. Confed- 
erate Army, now more popularly known as the "Or- 
phan Brigade," was early in the field, held steadfastly 
to its convictions to the last, and maintained them 
against all comers in bloody battle, and was about the 
last ( 'on federate troops east of the M tssissippi, if not the 
very last, to fight the foe. The remnant that was left 
was closed with its adversary near Camden, S. C, when 
the news of Lee's surrender reached the field and the 
combattants drew off to await reliable intelligence. 

When it was announced that Johnston had capitu- 
lated to Sherman, the Kentuckians maTched back to 
Columbia, thence to Washington, Ga., where they sur- 
rendered their arms May 6, 1865. While many of 
them sought their homes individually; the brigade 
can hardly be said to have disbanded until it reached 
Kentucky, and every man set out for his own home. 
There were comparatively few of them left, but they 
were nearly all young men — quite a number not yet 
old enough to vote; and now, more than twenty- 
seven years from the time they came back to peaceful 
avocations, the majority of them still living, and 
many of them look as though they could go through 
another four years' campaign and come home, if alive, 
to take an active part again in the work-a-day world. 



COXFEDERATE VETERAN CAMP OF NEW YORK. 



Maj. Edward Owen, Secretary of the Executive 
Committee of this Camp, sends out a circular as fol- 
lows. It is to comrades ; 

A new constitution, embracing a history of the 
Camp from its origin to date, names of all officers, 
committees, and members of the veteran and depart- 
ment " Sons of Confederate Veterans" organizations, is 
about to be printed. 

This book will be gotten up in handsome style, and 
will have a wide circulation. 

It has been reported that many contemplate joining 
the Camp and the " Sons," but delay action. Members 
are therefore requested to get in all applications of 
eligible parties at he earliest possible date, in order 
that the names may be included in the lists of mem- 
bers to be published. 



24 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



THE HERMITAGE. 



---■»- 




The Ladies' II er- g 
raitage ' Association ! 
was organized in 188$, 
and tin- State Legis- 
ature conveyed the I 
house a n <1 twenty- 
five acres of ground, s 
that they might pre- 
serve the property as 
a perpetual memorial 
to Genera] Andrew 
Jackson. In the res- 
idence are the por- 
trait- and household 
furniture belonging 
to Genera] Jackson, 
numbering four hun- ( 

dred pieces. These th 

have been in the Hermitage nearly three-quarters of a 
century, and they speak of his life, and remind an 



>■..., ^tmtrrf'Vm 




GENERAL AND MRS. JACK 



E HOME OF "OLD HICKORY " 

observer of the times and character of the great hero. 

The Ladies' Hermitage Association has worked inde- 
fatigably to purchase these works, which are the prop- 
erty of ( !ol. A ndrew Jackson, and are now makings last 
final struggle to raise the purchase money, viz, 817,500. 
They are making constant appeals to the puhlic for 
this sum. Should they fail, the " Hermitage," the 
home of the old hero of New Orleans, will be disman- 
tled. "The walls will testify, and empty rooms will 
speak, of the lack of appreciation of his countrymen. 
These historic works will be scattered throughout the 
country, their owners heing compelled by financial 
necessity to part with them for a monied value, and 
the State of Tennessee and the 'Hermitage' itself 
will lose these beautiful mementos of the past." 

The Association, in redeeming its trust to the State, 
have put a new roof upon the building, painted the 
exterior, refenced the twenty-five acres, and restored 
the old historic cabin from almost utter decay. Other 
minor improvements have exhausted their treasury 
as fast as the moneys were accumulated, but they do 
not despair of finally raising this money. They hold 
an option expiring July 1st, Of this year. 

Mrs. Judge Nathaniel Baxter President, and Mrs. 
Duncan K. Dorris, the Secretary, have worked with 
unremitting /.eal for this cause. 

[NSCRIPTIONS AT THE TOMB. 

On the shaft: 

GENERAL ANDREW JACKSON. 
Horn March 10th, 17H7. Died June Kth, 1845. 

On a slab, placed there evidently by the General : 

"Here lie the remains of Mk-s. RACHEL Jackson, wife of President 
Jackson, who died the 22d of December, W2S, aged HI years. Her face 
was fair, her person pleasing, her temper amiable, her heart kind; 
she delighted In relieving the wants of her fellow creatures, and cul- 
tivated that divine pleasure by tin- most liberal and unpretending 
met hods ; to the poor she was a benefactor ; to the rich an example ; 
to the wretched a comforter; t" "»e prosoerous an ornament; her 
piety went baud In hand with her benevolence, and she thanked her 
Creator for being permitted to do good. A being so gentle and so vir- 
tuous slander might wound hut could not dishonor; even death, 
when he bore her from the arms of her husband, could but transport 
her to the bosom of her (iod." 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



25 



ABOUT CONFEDERATE HOMES. 



[It is intended to revise and re-publish the account of Confederate 
Homes iu next issue, and to make the best showing possible for this 
cause. ] 

Mrs. 0. M. Spofford, in sending a $100 check, for 
the Confederate Home near Nashville, says : " I send 
it with the hearty wish that each dollar may hring 
three-fold aid to our poor Confederates, who have 
nothing to look to save the generous assistance of 
their neighbors. She gave $100 to the Davis Monument. 
Lee Camp Soldiers' Home, spacious and beautiful 
grounds ami buildings, situated just west of the city 
adjoining Reservoir Park, on the fashionable driveway. 
provided by private munificence at an aggregate out- 
lay approximating $200,000, and maintained by private 
subscriptions, supplemented by annual appropriations 
from the city and State, earing for about lot' inmates, 
The chapel on these grounds contains numerous Con-, 
federate memorial stained glass windows, 

The ex-Confederates of Missouri and their friends 
have ever been zealous in their efforts for their dis- 
abled comrades and their honored dead. They have 
been very zealous during the past two years in the 
procurement of a Home for disabled soldiers, The 
record they have made deserves publicity, [n. two 
years they have raise. 1 iu the aggregate tor the pur- 
pose $74,889.92. The Daughters of the Confederacy 
and other lady's societies throughout the State raised 
$18,025. The' Daughters of the Confederacy of the 
State of Missouri have assumed the task of erecting 
the main building on this Confederate Home, which 
is to cost $22,000, The building is now up and under 
roof, and will lie finished by May next. It has a 
frontage of '.Id feet, it is lid feet deep, and is ar- 
ranged for 100 to 125 inmates. The buildings already 
in use for the home have 82 men. women and children, 
who are being cared for by the Associat ion. The < 'on- 
federate Home of Missouri is now one of the es- 
tablished institutions of the State, and one which is 
paid for entirely by private contributions of her citi- 
zens, and of which she may lie proud. If there is an 
ex-Confederate soldier or any member of his family in 
a poor-house in the State of Missouri it is because the 
fact of such service is not known. The manner of 
procuring this large fund is worthy of imitation. The 
State was laid off into fourteen districts and in every 
district creditable zeal was displayed. The smallest 
sum raised in anyone was $636, and the largest $4,067. 
The head officers of the ex-Confederate Association 
of Missouri deserve great credit for their zeal in he- 
half of the Home and their maintenance of the or- 
ganization. Its officers are President, .lames Banner- 
man, St. Louis; Vice President. Harvey W. Salmon, 
Clinton: Superintendent, M. I.. Belt, Higginsville; 
Surgeon. .1. .1. Fulkerson, M. D, Higginsville; Treas- 
urer, H. A. Ricketts, Mexico ; Secretary, W. P. Barlow, 
3812 Cook avenue, St. Louis. Executive Committee : 
K. F. Peddicord, Hannibal; F. L Pitts, Paris; A. C. 
Cook, Plattshurg; Elijah Crates, St. Joseph; John B. 
Stone, Kansas City; F, P. Bronaugh, Boonville; W. 
H Kennan, Mexico; Henry Guibor, St. Louis; Frank 
Gaiennie, St. Louis; Geo. T. MeNamee, St. Louis; E. 
G. Williams, Waynesville ; W. C. Bronaugh, Lewis 
Station ; I). C. Kennedy, Springfield; G. H. P. Catron, 
Springfield. 



St. Lot is. Dec. 31, 1892, 
In a letter sent with the above date W. P. Barlow,. 
Secretary of the State Association, says: "You will see 
from this the reason why we can not aid the V. C. V.'s 
in their splendid work. ' We could not ask our Legis- 
lature to build this Home, as the States farther South 
can and have done * * * All our energy must 
he entered on caring for the living. As many of our 
Southern friends do not understand this, it will be a 
great favor if you will explain it in your article." 



Jefferson Davis Mansion, the " White House of the' 

Confederacy." Clay Street, corner of Twelfth, is the gift 
of the city of Richmond to the Hollywood Memorial 
Association, to be perpetually maintained as a Con- 
federate Museum. It is worth about $30,000. 

Residence of Gen. R. E. Lee. 7<>7 East Franklin St.. 
benefaction of the Stewarts, of Brook Hill, providing 
a permanent home for the Virginia Historical Society..' 
Worth about $20,000. 

Memorial stained glass windows to Gen. H. E. Lee 
in St. Paul's Church. Gift of the Stewart family, cost- 
ing several thousand dollars. 



THE SOUTH AS OTHERS SEE IT. 



Introductory to a comparison in church matters, 
the New Vork Ecu, q, list, in its first 1893 issue, says: 

" It is now more than twenty-seven years since the- 
dose of our civil war (Gen. Lee surrendered on the 
'.'tl'i of April, 1865), but we remember it as if it were 
yesterday. Of course it tilled the North with rejoic- 
ing, but the triumph was saddened by thoughts of the 
thousands who had gone out from Northern homes, 
never to return; and when we had recovered from the 
first excitement and began to think soberly of what 
had been lost and gained, we soon came to the con- 
clusion that the result- wen not nil m, on t side. For the 
time the strength of the South seemed to have been 
annihilated; and the Southern soldier, altera display 
of courage as magnificent as any in history, lav ap- 
parently dead upon the field. ' But some said, es- 
pecially those who met him on the field and knew 
what tremendous vitality he had, he is not dead, 
though he is for the time in a state of collapse, but 
hy-and-hy the blood will come back into his veins, 
and he will stand again on his feet and show signs of 
his old power. Others went farther still, and predict- 
ed for the South not only a resurrection to life, hut to 
a' more vigorous life than she ever had before. They 
said, ' We of the North claimed the victory, but the 
result will be a greater gain to the South than even to 
us, for war has done what peace could never do, it has 
destroyed slavery, the terrible incubus which has hung 
upon the South for generations, and which could only 
be shaken off by some tremendous convulsion, and 
now, after a time, we shall see the South start forward 
on a career of progress such as she never had before,' 
a prophecy which a quarter of a century has gloriously 
fulfilled. The South has gained more than the 
North, so that, strange as it may seem, the issue of 
the war has been a victory for both sides, as it has 
finally brought them together into a more perfect and 
more glorious union." 



t6 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



THE DAVIS MONUMENT FUND. 



..1ST OF THOSE WHO HAVE CONTRIBUTED. 

The list "f contributors is arranged under two heads, 
First, those whose names are given, and second, the 
sums collected where the names of donors are not 
known. It ie earnestly requested that for next issue 
name8.be supplied for the other lists, so the record of 
contributors may be as complete as possible. The 
names from Birmingham and other Alabama points 
are to appear in the next issue. 

This important list i^ incomplete. It will be re- 
i and republished. Kadi name represents 81. 

ALABAMA. 

P.iitMiN'.HAM — .1 I. Buford. 

(iKKENVIU.E — I. aura E Abrams, E R Adams, J T 
Beeland, .1 G Daniel & Co, I) G Dunklin, YV J Dunk- 
lin. Dunn & Ezekiel, C B Herbert, L M Lane, Robt 
A Lee, .1 A Me(iehce. (.'has Newman, Chas Newman, 
T \V Peagler, Wm Pierce, Mrs \V Fierce, Mrs It Y Por- 
ter, J I! Porterfield, J B Powell,.! C Richardson, F C 
Smith, I C Steiner, J M Steiner, S J Steiner. A Stein- 
hart, A G Stewart. T .1 Thomas, Rev G It Upton, J H 
Wilson, Mrs E S V Wilson. 

Gadsden — J Aiken, \V (I Brockway and A L Glenn, 
85; Wm Chandler, A -I Collingsworth, L W Dean, A 
B Dunny, \V A Dungan, W H Denson,85; HG Earnest, 
Frank & Haysdon, M L Hicks, L E Humphreys, Meek 
Jc Johnson, $5; .1 H Standifer, Abe Thompson, J E 
Whaley, K A Mitchell, R Goldman and L Smith, 
•f Queen City Bank #5. 

IIintsv n.i.K — Miss Jeanie Sheffey. 

Moiiii.k — J R Burgett, \V W Dugger, Van Dorn sta- 
tion; \V<; Duggar, Gallion station; Miss M B Kirk- 
liride, T T Roche, Louise B Sprague, .1 It Tompkins, 
.1 I. Tucker, Price Williams, .Jr. 

Piiatt Mines— I) M B Hasslet, J T Massingen, T E 
Mitchell, J ii Moore, W N Polk, J W Randall, L M 
Bccse, .1 A Rhodes, P .1 Rogers, 82; W L Rogers, C A 
Simmons, E A Smith, Walton & Peteel, E E Wiggins. 

Union Spkings — 1) S Bethunc, Virginia A Black- 
inon, N M Blidsoe, II G Bryan, Annie E Buford, J R 
Buford, II P Coleman, Mrs S •) Foster, C C Frazer, Mrs 
N II Frazer, W H Fuller, E H Goodwin, R H Hajas, 
Annie I. Hobdv, Jennie McKay Hobdv, .1 B Hobdy, 
Marie Hobdv, Marv Hobdy, R L Hobdv, R L Hobdy, 
Jr., Chas L .links, A Miles', Mrs F M Moseley, Mrs A 
I! I'hillips, Mrs .1 E Pickett, W W Rainer, T P Han- 
dle. E T Handle, J L Roberts. 

ARKANSAS. 

AriirsTA — James Eblin. 

Batesvim.e — Nathan Adler, Simon Adlcr, James 
A Luster, John F Alien, W E Bevens. J \VCase,Jas A 
Carter, J P Collin, R M Desha, W J Erwin, I) C 
Ewing, John W Fen-ill. J C Fitzhugb, E L Givens, S 
A Hail, H M Hodge, T J Home, W B Lawrence, T M 
Mack, Robt Neill, T J Owens, I N Reed, James Ruth- 
erford, M A Wycough, MAR Wycough. 

Hot Springs — Dr Holliday, ?•"). 

Moohefield — Jesse A Moore, J E Ross. 

GEORGIA. 

Blackshear — A P Brantley, Nettie Brantley, Henry 
J Smith, Jennie Smith. 



Chu KAMAtcA — S F Parrott. 
Macon — Chas Herbst. 

ILLINOIS. 
Chicago — Col G Forrester, Gen W A C Ryan. Mrs 
Ryan, Col. J G Ryan, Mrs E A Shannon. 
Lilly — E W Bacon. Miss Lilly Bacon. 
Mackinaw— Mrs L E Brock. 

INDIANA. 
Evansvii.i.e — A J Thomas, So. 
Indianapolis — G F Miller, 85. 

KENTUCKY. 
Fairview — Bethel Sunday School, $8.50; R W Dow- 
ner, 83; P E Downer, $2.50; S B Jesup, B D Lackey, 
H E Morton, J L Moselv, $1.50; R L Moselv, 81.50; 
W R Vaughn. 

Pembroke— R T Chilton, Mrs. R T Chilton. 

Hopkinsville — W B Dicken. 

Frankfort — W T Havens. 

Georgetown — A H Sinclair, $5. 

Henderson — R H Cunningham, W M Hanna, M 
M Kimmel, J W Lockett, Sights & Johnston, Mont- 
gomery Merritt, D J B Reeve, J J Reeve, P K Snead, 
F Walker. 

RissELLVii.LE— T J Bailey, $6.05; Dr R N Beau- 
champ, $1 ; J B Briggs, $5; George R Beall, $1 ; Wil- 
son Beard, 81 ; R B Chastain, $1; Joseph Cumbett, 
$1 ; John W Caldwell, 5 ; Dr B F Kidd, 81 ; W B 
McCarty, 81; James M McCutchen, 81; John G. 
Orndorff, 81 ; William Smith, 81 ; C. W. Swanson, 81 ; 
M B Stovall, $1. 

LOUISIANA. 

New Orleans, La., Nov. 23, 1892. 

W. R. Lyman, A. A. General, New Orleans: 

Comrade — Complying with general orders No. 9, IT. 
C. V., dated Oct. 8, 1892, 1 beg to submit the following 
detailed report of all collections for account of the 
Jefferson Davis Monument Fund turned over to me as 
Treasurer for Louisiana for that fund, and the dispo- 
sition I have made of the same, from June 22, 1891, 
to Nov. 23, 1892': 

1891. 

June 22, John T. Block, La. Div. A. N. V 8 102 65 

June 22, Wm. McLaughlin, Vet. C. S. C... 54 00 

Julv 1, J. Y. Gilmore, La. Div. A. N. V 55 00 

July 1, J. B. Levert, Sugar and Rice Ex 100 50 

July 1, J. B. Levert, Vet. C. S. C 40 50 

July 1, Jos. Demoruelle, C. H. St. Paul 22 00 

July 8, Lawson L. Davis, C. H. St. Paul 43 00 

July 9, Col. Wm. P. Johnston, Soldiers and 

Sons of Soldiers of Avery's Salt Mines 11 25 

July 10, Gen. Oeo. O. Watts, Jefferson Davis 

Camp 25 00 

July 10, Gen. Geo. 0. Watts, Citizens and 

Soldiers of Blue and Gray 64 00 

July 16, Pilcher Bros, and W. H. Pilcher, 

proceeds of Pilcher, concert, July 10 <>6 00 

Julv 17, Chas. D. Dclerev, Armv of Tenn. La. 

Div. fund created " 102 50 

July 22, A. W. Hyatt, A. of T. La. Div 75 00 

Julv 22, J. B. Levert, Vet. C. S. C 60 00 

July 22, J. B. Levert, Sugar and Rice Ex 8 50 

July 22, A. N. Block, La. Div. A. N. Va 9 50 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



27 



July 22, Lawson L. Davis, C. H. St. P 10 00 

July 22, Jos. Demoruelle, C. H. St. R 36 50 

July 22, B. F. Eschelman, C. Wa. Art 150 10 

July 22, Alden McClellan, La. Div. Armv of 

Tenn 72 00 

Aug. 17, Octave Fontenot, La. Div. Army of 

Tenn. at Opelousas 40 00 

Sept. 10, Paul Conrad, C. H. St. Paul 221 50 

Oct. 27, Oliver Normand, R. L. Gibson Camp 

and Ladies of Evergreen 75 IS 

1892. 
Jan. 8, Judge F. A. Monroe, members liar, 

Bench and Officers C. D. Courts 310 <k» 

Jan. 15, R. McMillan, C. Wash. Art 17 50 

Feb. 10, John T. Block, Armv of N. Va. La. 

Div., collected by J. M. Wilson 22 00 

April 13, J. Lyons, citizens of New Orleans... 33 00 
Oct. 11, Nicholson & Co., sundry collections 

of N. 0. Picayune 78 50 

Oct. 11, Nicholson & Co., subscription of the 

N. O. Picayune ' 100 00 

Nov. 18, J. W. Fairfax, sundry collections of 

Daily City Item ' 50 50 

Less disbursements to date as per vouchers 

on Hie 17 75 

»2,0i is 7m 
Oct. 10, remitted to J. S. Ellett, 

treasurer, Richmond, Va 82,018 20 

Nov. 22, remitted to J. S. Ellett, 

treasurer, Richmond, Ya 50 50—12,068 70 



Respectfully submitted, 



A. W HYATT, 

Treasurer for Louisiana. 



RECAPITULATION of RECEIPTS. 

Camp Henry, St. Paul S 333 00 

Members 01 the bar. bench, and officers of 

the Civil District Courts 310 <*> 

Armv of Tennessee, La. Division 289 50 

(amp Washington Artillery.. 197 60 

Army of Northern Virginia, La. Div 189 I" 1 

New Orleans Picayune 17 s 50 

Veterans C. S. Cavalry 154 50 

Sugar and Rice Exchange.. bin 1 m i 

R, L.Gibson ('. and ladies. Evergreen, La.... 7"> 45 

Pilcher concert 66 00 

Citizens of Alexandria, L.a 64 00 

Daily City Item ,... 50 50 

Citi/ens of New Orleans, by J. Lyons 33 00 

.let!' Davis Camp, Alexandria, La 25 00 

Avery Salt Mines 11 25 



Total collections 82,086 45 

M wskield— J W Adams, C W Blair, $5; T J Book- 
er, F M Brownfield, C T Raunnman, Henry Burns, 
John S Bailey, James Brown, Dr B D Cooper, Dr \V 
X Cunningham, Cash, .las Dilzell, DeSoto Democrat, 
&5; .1 B Dillon, J Douglas, W J Elaiu C W Elam, W 
F Fraser, S B Foster, E N Foster, Dr J YV Fair, Wm 
Goss, 85; H D Gibbons, John Glossill, S A Guy, R T 
Gibbs,L II Hanson, W P Hall, W T Haden, J E Hewett, 
John Huson, W B Hewitt, A M Hewitt, B F Jenkins, 
85; \V T Jackson, J B Lee, J T MeClanahan, W H 
Mason, W E May, R R Murphy, W L Minter, E A 
Nabors, J M Nabors. E R Nabors, W T Pegins, E B 
Pickels, J W Parsons, A V Roach, C W Page, B B 
Powell, G Rives, Sallie Rascoe, E B Rogers, J H Ras- 



coe, Q Roberts, P H Ricks. Dr A V Roberts, $2.50; J 
Reilev, Albert Rives, M Ricks, Jas A Rives, J C Rives, 
CaptAV P Sample, 85; Dr S J Smart, C J Smoote, W 
E Singleton, Dr Stoakes, Dr W Sutherland, O H P Sam- 
ple, E \V Sutherland, G H Sutherland, Miss Belle 
Tavlor, Sam Williams, W N Williams, B Wilier, B N 
Wimple, T J Williams, J B Williams, Chas P Will- 
iams, J B Williams. Jr., Dr J F Walker, Y Wemple, 
J Wemple, L B Wilcox, J L Williams, G B Will- 
iams. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Fayette — James Archer, F Braws, Thos Davenport. 
W L Faulk, H McGladery, T .1 Key, W W McAa, A 
K McNair, W K Penny, W L Stephen, J J Whitney. 

Holly Springs — Jas T Fant. 

Oi ean Sim;]\..s Mrs A A Staples. 

Rockney — Geo Hickler. 

NEW JERSEY. 

Hoboken — James Coltart, 85; Miss Yirginia M Col- 
tart, Harriet Monk, John Stansrield. 

TENNESSEE. 

Adams Station — M L Johnston. 

Alamo— W H Riggs, J B Fleming, C A Goodbar, 
J B Humphreys, $2; I' B Nance, W H Poindexter, T 
N Skelton, .1 I') Wortham. 

Bells Station— Wm B Late, Capt. Dawson, 1'. S 
MeLemore, J.C W Nunn, J H Thomas, D H Thomas. 

Brownsville Judge John Bond. 

I \IR11 — W J Lambert. 

Castalian Springs Geo Harsh. 

Chattanooga— G Andrews, Jr., N G Atkins, Creed 
F -Rates, W M Rearden, P F Craig, W R Crabtrec, D 
W Clem, H L Goulding,|5; J R Pound, W T Plumb. 
G H Snead, J F Shipp, T E YanYalkenburg, L G 
Walker. 

CLARKSVILLE — Arthur H Munford. 
Covington— R B Green fund, 854 
Red Lick — Jos Kling. 
Crockett — J T Stamps. 

Friendship — J M Cochran, B H Harman, D B 
Woodson. 

Gallatin — Jas W Blackmore, David F Barry, C S 

Douglass, W C Dismukes, J R Harrison, Jas J Turner, 
Geo E Seay, J A Trousdale, S F Wilson. 

Jaikson— E L Rullock, 85. 

Johnson's Grove — J R Worrell. 

Hartsviu.e — John D Stalker. 

Maury City — Sid Avery, W H Carter, Dr R Moore, 
C Peal, Bryant Stallings. 

McMinnville — I W Irwin. 

Monroe — Dr J M Shelton. 

Nashville— Jos W Allen, Mrs J W Alien, R R 
Allen, Kate M Allen, Lieut Samuel M Allen, Mrs R R 
Allen, Walter Aiken, S T C Doak, A J Grigsby, W C 
Kelvington, 810; John J Yertrces, Rev W R L Smith. 

Sweetwater — T T Hagar. 

YiCKsniKt;.— Through Col. D. A. Campbell, $40'.t. 

Waverly — H C Carter. 

TEXAS. 
Roz — R F Forrester. 

Rrownwood— G H Adams, J L Harris, F W Hender- 
son, C C Jones, J R Smith, E R Stanley, Ed T Smith. 



28 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



(•(.i.k.man— .1 B Coleman, I. E CollinB,C I. Coleman. 
Pilham Coleman, W <' l>il>rcll. •">. 

Waxahachie— A J Baxter, John P Cooper, E Chas- 
ka, Joe P Cooper, G H Cunningham, Miss Meta Coop- 
er. $11; J A Harrow. Dr W E Farmer, B F Forrester, 
J A Gray, B H Lattimer, M W McMight, L H Peters, 
Win Stilus. T F. Thompson, M B Templeton. 
VIRGINIA. 

Abingdon — Virgie M Gildersleeve I now Mrs. Taylor). 

Birmingham — I) Walker. 

Brenner lii.ru— W U Holman 

Bybee— R S White. 

Charlottesville — M Duke George Perkins. 

Ci'i pepper— D A Grundy. 

Palmyra— M P Pettit, Pembroke Pettit, William 
Schlater, J Shepard, G M Winn. 

St'OTTSVILLE — 1> W Anderson. 

Union Mills — Dr. Dudley R Boston. 

Wilmington — John \V Adams. 

CONTRIBUTIONS .Nut I N< I.I l>l".l> ELSEWHERE. 
ARKANSAS. 

Aiikadelphia— J 11 Abraham, $2.50; C K Boswell, 
F.I Carpenter, Adam (lark. . I VV Conger, R T Cook, 
$2.50; I) T Dale. $2.50; .1 II Crawford, T M Ewing, 
$2.50; Goo Fuller, $5; E L Jones, C V Murray, E H 
McDonald, E (' McDonald, .1 A Ross, $2.50; re 
Scott, $2.50; John Smoker. $2.50; Ed Thomas, A W 
Wilson, .1 W Wilson. 

Ei. Dorado— W It Applcton. 

Hope— Mrs C A Forney 

Moiikillton — West 1 1 umphrej's. 



l-i. 



FI/HUDA. 

-Mrs l.etitia A Nutt, Miss 



N: 



S.WIItKI. 

Nutt. $5. 

UEORG1A. 

A.mekmus — C B Hudson, $2; W E Murphy. 

Atlanta — E L Anthony, Geo 'J' Bccland, Charles 
Recrmann & Co, $15; .1 L 'Bishop, F C Bitgood, B M 
Blackburn, W II Black, $2; I. R Blcckly, $5: N s 
Blum, $2; S D ltauhvill, $2; .1 D Brady, $2; Robert 
Bra/.elton, G S Brewster, $2 ; E C Brown, S E Brown, 
T.1 Bumcy, David .1 Bush, $2; Milton A Candler, S 
N Chapman, .1 II Clifton, Philip Cook, $5; II U Cobb, 
A 1'] Con, C.I Daniel, II I! Daman, M K Dennis,.! A 
Foote, L B Folsom, W E Fonti, Harry Frank, $2; 
Arnold Gedman, M BGihnox, WC Glenn, $5; Peter 
(i Grant, II II Green, $2; D R G rover. R G Guinn, -I 
I. Harrison, Rev W M Hayes, $2; \V M Hawkes, R II 
Hightower, .las K Hincs, $5; .Jerry Ilolmos, Joseph 
Jacobs, $2; II Jennings, Mark W Johnson, J C Joiner, 
GeoH Jones, $2; -I Win Jones, $50; .las L Key, $2;, 
Dr .1 .1 Knott, $2; Lamar & Rankin, 85; S II I. ami rum, 
Thos J Leftwick. $5; Walter T Me Arthur, 82; D E 
MeCartv, llv MeCaw, 1! I, Mcintosh, $2; C K Mad- 
dox, $5'; I H Martin, $2; 11 A Matthews, V A Menard, 
C W Morgain, F II Moses, A J Moss, J W Nelms, $2; 
R T Nesbitt, $5; W M Newborn, $2; Newton, Baker 
& Co, II 1. Nippert, $2; Robert A Nishett, 82; John 
Perry, 82; Wm H H Phelps, 82; .1 B Pickett, P 
Roman, 85; Lavender Ray ,$2 ; K Reed, H N Ried, 
$2; Sidney Root, 810; W E Seabrook, Geo W Scott, 
$25; W L Seddon. $5; John W Shackelford, A G 
Smart, $2; Burgess Smith, John Clay Smith, 82; Hoke 



Smith, $oO; W J Speairs, J C Steerman, 82; R E 
Stockton, $2; J r> Stokes, Jos Thompson, $o; B Vig- 
noux, 82: C Z Weinmaeter, 82; W A Wright, $2; A 
R Wright. 82: Wm A.Wright, $5. 

Augusta — Wm II Fleming. 

Arlington— H C Hefiield, 82.50. 

Burin — James Youilg. 

Carrollton — J M Hewitt, 82. 

CEDARTOWN — J H Sanders. 82. 

Crawford — 1 G Gibson, $2. 
Danville— T L Hill, S W Sapp. 
Dublin — T L Griner, John M Stubbs. 
Georgetown — John C Guilford. 
Glennville — J P Collins, $5. 
Handy — W L Crouder. 

Macon— J O Bel), 82: Mrs A S Cope, 82 ; J W Hin- 
ton, 82; -las M Sapp. 

MlLLEDGEVlLLE — I C Woodward. 
Moher — B F Hoodspette. 
Montezuma — K Chambers. 
Palatka — Capt S H Gray. 
Smithboro — James Thomas Smith. 
Sonoraville — P T Reese. 
Sylvania — E W Frey. 
I'kmpi.k — Rohert II Faber. 
Van's Valley — Alex White. 
Walkersville — J W Johnson. 

INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Choteau— J H Baugh, M G Butler, W A Cantrell, 
V Gray, 82; C Hayden, A G McDaniel. 
Pryor Creek — Tom A Hancock. 
Sherman — M L Elzy. 

ILLINOIS. 
Chicago — James Fentress. 

MISSOURI. 

II R F:stes. $2.50. 

NEW MEXICO. 
Silver City — C A Thompson. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 
Jackson — J A Burgwyn,GeoPBurgwyn, J B McRoe, 

R B Peebles. 

TENNESSEE. 

Bolivar— P W Austin, W T Anderson, C H Ander- 
son, Ophelia P Rills, L M Carrington, W C Dorion, D 
E Durrett, R E Diirrett, W W Farley, JL Foot. C S 
Ganden, H P Joyner, Kahn Bros., Austin Miller, f E 
Moore, A T McNeal, J J Neely, Jr., M N Perry, J C 
Savage, II W Tate, Julia M Upshaw, Hugh Williams, 
It II Wood. Bv oversight the amounts were not put 
to the Bolivar list that exceeded 81. The collection 
there is 812:5 not yet forwarded. 

Fayetteville— J P Buchanan, J L Buchanan, W 
II Calhoun, A J C.uloss, N P Carter, James Cashion, 
W R Cashion, Andrew fashion, W H Cashion, A 
Cashion, H B Douglass, HC Dwiggins, $5: J C Demer, 
A II Edmondson, S W Fleming, Hugh Francis, J C 
Goodrich, Theo Harris, Jr. E J Higgins, H K Holman, 
T C Little, R K Locker, C A McDaniel, W C Morgan, 
J D Parks, W C Parks, J H Pitts, G F Pitts, G F Ren- 
egar, B T Boach, Robertson & Goodrich, J W Scott, 
J W Smith, H D Smith, A E Smith, J M Stewart, O 
C Tallant; E S Terry, Thomas Thomison, W P Tolley, 
R D Warren. H C Dwiggins' address is Petersburg. 

Crank Junction -W C Mauldrin. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



29 



MONEYS RECEIVED FOR THE MONUMENT — THE NAMES OF 
DONORS TO BE SUPPLIED. 

Request is made for all lists of names procurable 
from the following : 

ALABAMA. 
Anniston — Through Mrs. R. Gardner, 821. 
Birmingham — Through Mrs. R. Gardner, $200. 
Eutaw — Sanders' Camp, $6. 

Montgomery— Through Mrs. M. D. Bibb, 8143.85 
Tuscumbia— Through Col. A. H. Kellar, $13.15. 

ARKANSAS 
Little Rock— Hon. John G. Fletcher, $11.25. 

FLORIDA. 
Jacksonville — Gen. William Baya, $500. 

GEORGIA. 
Au<;usta— Patrick Walsh and others, 84(H). ill. 
Sparta — Through Mrs. Middlebrooks, $41.75. 

MISSISSIPPI. 
V1CK8BURG — The Vicksburg ('. V. Camp, through 
Col. D. A. Campbell, $409.55. 

MISSOURI. 
Harrisonnille — Jeff Bur ford, $75. 
NORTH CAROLINA. 
Charlotte — Through the Observer, $29.50. 
Salisbury— Sent to Judge W L Calhoun, $15.25. 
Statesville — Through J. P. Caldwell, $4 
Waynesville— R..Y. Dylus, 88.25. 

TENNESSEE 
Lewisburc, — Through Capt. W. (J. Loyd, 8*5. 
McKenzie— Through - — , $103.20.' 

TEXAS. 
Corpus Christi — M C Spann, collection, $177.75. 
Fort Worth— Through Mrs. B. B. Pollard, $101.70. 
, Mrs S R Coggm, $7. 



lected quite a sum from various sources. In Julv last 
General Burbridge addressed to the Times-Unum a 
communication — which was published —suggesting 
that if the contributors to the Relief Fund, of which 
he was custodian, offered no objection, this money 
might be turned over to the Davis Monument Fundf, 
and he sent his check for $25 as a contribution to the 
monument movement." This "relief fund" was 
offered to Mrs. Davis, but she declined to accept it. 



SOME who have helped the fund. 

Louisville — Miss Martha A. Sneed, $10; Miss Jo- 
sephine Walker. 

New Orleans — Mrs. May Poitevant, $5. 

Mansfield — Miss Belle Taylor. 

Clarksville — Little Miss Huckner, $5. 

J. W. Simmons, of Mexia. Tex., reports the follow- 
ing contributions for $1 each: W. H. Williams, C. L. 
Watson, J. W. Simmons, H. W. Gray, J. M. Rombo, 
Joe Wilder, H. A. Boyd, E. B. McCoy, Bennett Hunt 
and Mrs. D. A. Murphy, of Mexia, and Capt. T. B. 
Tyers, of Groesbeck, and adds: ''I will send a large 
list after the concert." Preparations are being made 
for an entertainment there the 27th inst. for the pro- 
motion of the fund. 

Jacksonville. Fla., has done a splendid part for the 
Davis Monument Fund. Much credit is due that 
people for their zeal. It will be recalled that the pop- 
ulation of Jacksonville is very largely Northern. The 
Times-Union has this to say of the fund raised there, 
which has been forwarded to Richmond through the 
General Agent: "Gen. William Bayabecame treasurer 
of the local fund. The principal solicitor was W. D. 
Matthews, who raised, in all, 8205.50. — most of it in 
small contributions, ranging from 25 cents to $5. Mr. 
Matthews devoted a good deal of his time to the work, 
as he could spare it from his regular daily business, 
and the people of Jacksonville will be indebted to him 
for a large portion of the credit which they receive for 
their generosity. Mr. Clarence W. Smith also col- 



THE CONQUERED BANNER. 




BY FATHER ABRAM .1. RYAN, THE l'OET PRIEST OF THE 80CTB. 



Furl that banner, for 'tis weary, 
Round Ms Mutt 'tis drooping dreary; 

Furl I', fold It, It Is bent: 
For there's not a man to wave it, 
And there's not a sword to save It, 
And there's not one left to lave It 
In the blood which heroes gave It. 
And It* foes now scorn and brave It- 
Furl It. hide It, let It rest. 
Take the banner down — 'tis tattered, 
Broken Is Its staff and shattered, 
And the valient hosts are scattered 

I >\ er wbom It floated high. 
< Hi • t is hard for us to fold it, 
Hard to think there's none to hold It, 
Hard that those who once unrolled II 

Now must unfurl it with a sigh. 
Furl that banner, furl It sadly— 
Once ten thousand hailed It gladly, 
And ten thousa< d wildly, madly. 
Swore It should forever wave, 
Swore that foeinan's sword could never 
Heart* like theirs entwined dissever. 
Till that flag would float forever 

o'er their freedom or their grave. 
Furl It, for the hands that grasped It, 
And the hearts that fondly clasped It, 

< 'old and dead are lying low : 
And the banner, it Is trailing. 
While around It sounds the walling 

of It* people In their woe. 
For, though conquered, they adore It, 
Love the cold, dead hands that bore It, 
Weep for those who fell before it, 
Pardon those who trailed and tore It, 
And oh: wildly they deplore It, 

Now to furl and fold It so. 
Furl that banner! true 'lis gory, 
Yet 'tis wreathed around with glory, 
And 'twill live In song and story, 

Though Its folds are in the dust ; 
For its fame oir brightest pages, 
Penned by poets and by sages, 
Shall go sounding down the ages, 

Furl Its folds though now we must, 
Furl that banner, softly, slowly, 
Treat it gently— It is holy— 

For It droops above the dead ; 
Touch It not, unfold It never, 
Let It droop there, furled forever. 
For Its people's hopes are dead. 



3° 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



SOME M7/'/ HAVE WORKED FOR THE CM <iE. 



■I. L. Buford, of Birmingham, Ala., who was a mem- 
lyton Guards, First Alabama Regiment, 
di'l this clever thing in t lection with tin' monu- 
ment Fund: tie subscribed 110 for himself and nine 
others. One of the contribution books was sent him 
t<> insert their names, which In- forwarded t" Ins sister 
Mi-- Am. i. E. Buford, of Union Springs, Ala., and 
.-!,. -• ■ urv.l twenty names, with ?1 each. 

Mrs. R. Y. Porter, of Greenville, Ala., on being ap- 
plied to, felt discouraged with the pros] t. hut when 

ibscription 1 k was sent her, she procured thirty 

nam. -. « ithl 

Bright little Miss Louise Beverly Bprague, of Mobile, 
sends nine nanus with 81 each. 

James Rutherford, of Batesville, Ark., sends in 
twenty-six names with 81 each. 

James W. Blackmore, of Gallatin, Term., thirteen 
names with as many dollars, which he "gathered up" 
among his friends. 

\ good many halves and quarters come from Pratt 
Miles, Ala. 

Mi-- Jennie Smith, of Blackshear, Ga., sends $4, 
with as many names. 

In the contribution of Joseph W. Allen, of Nash- 
ville, the list includes the name of his son, Lieut. 
Samuel M. Allen, C. S. A., killed by bushwhackers 
while on furlough at a friend's house near Memphis, 
Tcnn.. March, 1864. 

A splendid list will be seen from B. F. Jenkins, 
President of the Davis Monument Association, Mans- 
field. La., which aggregates §107. 

•I. T. Cornell, of Cairo. Tcnn., furnishes twenty- 
eight "names with (28 to the fund. 

\V. L. Stephens, Fayette, Miss., sends a batch of 
name-, nearly all for 81 each. Money forwarded to 
1! ichmond. 

U. \V. Downer sends 824 from the little old village 
of Kaiiview. f\y., where Jefferson Davis was born. If 
all the other places would do as well in proportion, the 
South would have a Memorial Temple second to none 
other on earth. 

Col. John (ieorge Ryan sends from Chicago live dol- 
lar subscriptions, one of which was in the name of his 
brother, Gen. W. A. C. Ryan, of the United States 
Army, " who was one of those taken from the steamer 
Virginius, and murdered at Santiago del Cuba, Nov. 
1. 1873;" and another for their mother, deceased, 
\\ ho was an admirer of Southern chivalry. 

James Coltart, of Hohoken, N. J., sends a contribu- 
tion of So with three other names of $1 each. 

Maj. John J. Reeve, sends from Henderson, Ky., ten 

names, including his own, with 810. 

Maj. J. B. Briggs, of the John W. Caldwell Camp, 
Russellville, Ky., sends 828, including 8.") for himself, 
and a similar amount for the gentleman in whose 
honor the camp is named. 

Miss Meta Cooper, of Waxahatchie, Texas, sends a 
meat little note with ten subscriptions to the Monu- 
ment, of $1 each, except that qf ioel Cooper, which is 
for $2. 

Miss Mollie Cunningham, of Waxahatchie, Texas, 
sends three names with SI each. 



M. B. Burgwin, Jackson, X. C, sends 14 with the 
names of four friends.. 

Mrs. c. 1'. Morrow, of Chonteau, I. T.. sends ten 
names with as many dollars, including V. Gray, who 

put- |2 1" her li-t. 

\V. P. Renwick, of Monroe, La., writes of the col- 
lection of $64, which lias been forwarded to Rich- 
mond. He adds: "There is a prevailing notion that 
it is the duty of the Southern people to build a suita- 
ble memorial to the Confederacy through its Presi- 
dent, Davis, and a well organized movement will surely 

Succeed." 

In a remittance of fifteen dollar-. January 2d, from 
Otis s. Tarver, of the Joe Finnegan Camp, Sanford, 
Florida, I notice contributions from three little dar- 
lings, three, four, and six years. The names-are Linda 
C. Barnes. E. V. Barnes, and Hannah Myerson. 

The following list of ladies comprised the gen, ral 
committee of the Chrysanthemum Fair, held at Nash- 
ville. Now 11, the proceeds of which, when forwarded 
to Richmond, aggregated 81,178, the largest sum vat 
procured, except by the Young Men's" Democratic 
Club of Nashville : 

General Committee — Mrs. M B. Pilcher, Chairman ; 

Mesdames M . C. ( ioodlet t . W.J. W 1, Dr. McMurray, 

Dr. Maney, Burroughs, Locke, Hardison, John Johns, 
R. R. Pope, J. B. Lindsley, Mary Porter )# Jere Baxter. 
N. Baxter. Sr., .las. Frazer, Baskerville, E. W. Car- 
mack, Theo. Plumnier, R. C. Morris, John Overton, -I 
M. Dickinson. W. M. Hume. Col. Clark. \V. C. Smith, 
Nat Gooch, H. M. Doak.D. B. Cooper, John Bransfofd, 
W. 11. Jackson. John \V. Thomas, Jr., Tims. Malone, 
Shade Murray, Thos. Gibson, Will Eastman, J. M. 
Head, E. W. Cole, S. A. Champion, Norman Farrell, 
Martha Scruggs, John Hill Eakin, M. A. Spurr, A. J. 
Warren, Monroe Cheatham, Thos. Weaver, W. G. 
Bush. Sam'1 Keith, Mark CockrilL Stephen Childress, 
Robert Riddle, Horton Fall, Edward Buford; Albert 
Harris, R. B. Allen, Horace Lurton, John Hickman. 
H. W. Grantland, A. S. Marks, R. II. Dudley/ W. I... 
Wilson, Thos. W. Wrcnne, AVm. Duncan, A. W» Wills, 
V. 0. Wardlaw, Mary Robertson, F. II. East, John C 
Brown, Graham Horton, Marsh Polk, Julius Sax, 
Richard Douglas, Ernest Billow, Isaac Reese, J. I'. 
Drouillard, L. Rosenheim, Mprgan Brown, Fannie 
Cheatham, Cnllum, T. D. Crafignead, Andrew Mar- 
shall, John M. Bass, Richard ciieatham. .las. F.Cald- 
well, Wm Morrow, M. B. Tonev, J. C. Warner, J. X. 
Brooks; E. B. Stahlman, W. H. Mitchell, Ann E. Sny- 
der, Geo. Guild, Mary Raul McGEfire, Dr. Baird, Frank 
"Green, M. J. C. Wrcnne. W. T. Glasgow, D. C. Scales, 
Mary Clare, Roger Eastman, Lewis Eastman, Nat Bax- 
ter, 'Robt. Hollins, H. B. Buckner, W. L. Settle, 
Eugene Criddle, G, P. Rose, Dupree, Harry McAllister, 
John M. Gaut, T-hos. Plater, Van Kirkman, Leslie 
Warner, Baxter Smith, Alex. Porter, Thos. Kendriek, 
G. H. Baskette, Robt. Morris,- Ida Rutland, Cherrv, J. 
B. O'-Bryan, Will Cranbery, J. W. Thomas, W. C. 
Collier, Ross Reno, Mary Hart, J. P. W. Brown, Percy 
Warner, W. H. Peck, Will Scoggins, Misses Sallie 
Brown, White May, Mollie Claiborne, Henri Ewing, 
Nannie Seawell. 

Elsewhere reference is made to the Young Men's 
Democratic Club of Nashville, whose fund is the 
largest that has -ever been secured by any one organ- 
ization,and>to other Workers for the cause. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



3i 



DEATH OF GEN. STRAHL. 



AN ACCOUNT -OF ONE OF THE MOST 
EXTRAORDINARY EVENTS CON- 
NECTED WITH THE WAR. 



This sketch of the battle of Franklin, 
though not intended as an especial trib- 
ute to Gen. Strahl, is published in this 
connection with no greater desire than 
to honor the memory of that gallant sol- 
dier and devout Christain. 

The removal of Gen. Johnston and the 
appointment of Hood to succeed him in 
command of the Army of Tennessee, 
was an astounding event. So devoted 
to Johnston were his men that the pres- 
ence and immediate command of Gen. 
Lee would not have been accepted with- 
out complaint. They were so satisfied 
that even in retreat they did not lose 
their faith in ultimate success. They 
were not reconciled to the change until 
the day before the battle of Franklin. 
The successful crossing of Duck River 
that morning at an early hour, and the 
march to Spring Hill, where the Federal 
retreat was so nearly cut oil! a failure for 

which it was undent 1 Gen. Hood was 

not to blame), created an enthusiasm for 
him equal to that entertained for Stone- 
wall Jackson after his extraordinary 
achievements. That night the extensive 
valley east of Spring Hill was lighted up 
by our thousands of camp tires, in plain 
view of, and close proximity to, the re- 
treating lines of the enemy". The next 
morning, as we marched in quick time 
toward Franklin, we were continued in 
our impressions of Federal alarm. 1 
counted on the way thirty-four wagons 

that had been abandoned on the si th 

turnpike. In some instances whole 
teams of mules had been killed to pre- 
vent their capture. A few miles south 
of Franklin the Federal lines of infantry 
were deployed, and our progress was 
checked ; but we pressed them without 
delay until they retired behind the outer 
works about the town. Soon after they 
withdrew from the range of hills south, 
overlooking the place, and we were ad- 
vanced to its crest. 1 happened, though 
in the line of battle (as I was ''right 
guide" to my regiment), to be close to 
where (Jen. Hood halted his staff ami 
rode alone to the top of the hill, and 
with bis tield glasses surveved the situa- 
tion. It was an extraordinary moment. 
Those of us who were near could see, as 
private soldiers rarelv did, the position of 
both armies. Although Franklin was 
some two miles in the distance, the plain 
presented a scene of great commotion. 
But I was absorbed in the one man 
whose mind was deciding the fate of 
thousands. With an arm and a leg in 
the grave, and with the consciousness 
that he had not until within a couple of 
days won the confidence which his army 
had in his predecessor, he had now a 
very trying ordeal to pass through. It 
was all-important to act, if at all, at once. 
He rode to Stephen D. Lee, the nearest 
of his subordinate generals, and, shaking 
hands with him cordially, announced his 
decision to make an immediate charge. 



-10 event of the war perhaps showed 
a scene equal to this. The range of hills 
upon which we formed offered the best 
view of the battlefield, with but little 
exposure to danger, and'there were hun- 
dreds collected there as spectators. ( >ur 
ranks were being extended rapidly to 
the right and left. In Franklin there 
was the utmost confusion. The enemy 
was greatly excited. Wecould see them 
running to and fro. Wagon-trains were 
being pressed across the Harpeth river, 
and on toward Nashville. Gen. l.oring, 
of Cleburne's division, made a speech to 
his men. Our Brigadier-General Strahl 
was quiet, and there was an expression 
of sadness on his face. The Soldiers 
wore full of ardor, and confident of suc- 
cess. They- had unbounded faith in 
(en. Hood, whom they believed would 
achieve a victory that would give us 

Nashville. Such was the spirit of the 

army as the signal was given which set 
it in motion. Our generals were ready, 
and some of them rode in front of our 

main line. With a quickstep, we moveu 
forward to the sound of Btirring music. 

This is the only battle that 1 was in, and 
they were many, where bands of music 

Were used. I was right guide to the 

I orty-first Tennessee, marching four 
paces to (be front I bad an opportunity of 
viewing my comrades, and I well n mem- 
ber the look of determination that was 
on evi rv bee. Our bold movement 
1 tin> enemy to give up, w ithout 
much firing, its advanced line. As they 
fell back at double-quick, our men rushed 
forward, even though they hail to face 
the grim line of breastworks just at the 
■ dge "f the town. 

Before we were in proper distance for 
small arms, the artillery opened on 1m, th 
sides. Our guns, tiring over our heads 

10111 the bills in the rear, used ammuni- 
tion without stint, while the enemy's 
batteries were at constant play upon our 
lines. When they withdrew- to their 
main line of works, it was as one even 
plain for a mile. About fifty yards in 
front of their breastworks, we came in 
contact with formidable chevauxdi : 
over or through which it was very diffi- 
cult to pass. Why half of us were not 
killed, yet remains a mystery ; for after 

iovii.<r forward so great a distance, all 
tne ume unuer rue, me aetennon, imme- 
diately in their front, gave them a very 
great advantage. We arrived at the 
works, and some of our men after a 1 lub 
fight at the trenches, got over. I he 
colors of my regiment were carried in- 
side, and when the arm that held them 
was shot off, they fell to the ground and 
remained until morning. Cleburne's 
men dashed at the works, but their gal- 
lant leader was shot dead, ami they gave 
way, so that the enemy remained on our 
flank, and kept ud constant enfilading 
fire. 

Our left also fair I o hold the works, 
and for a shor ,dist« _'e we remained ami 
fought until t.e di . a was almost full of 
dead men. Night came on soon after 
the hard fighting began, and we fired at 
the flash of each other's guns. Holding 
the enemy's lines, as we continued to do 
on this part of them, we were terribly 
massacred by the enfilade firing. The 
works were so high that those who fired 
the guns were obliged to get a footing in 
the embankment, exposing themselves 
in addition to their flank, to a fire bv 



men in houses. One especially severe 
was that from Mr. Carter's, immediately 
in my front. I was near Gen. Strahl", 
who stood in the ditch, and handed up 
guns to those posted to fire them. I had 
passed to him my short Enfield (noted in 

the icgimentj al t the sixth tune. The 

man w ho had been tiring cocked it and 
was taking deliberate ami, when he w as 
shot and tumbled down dead into the 
ditch upon those killed bet',. re him. 
When the men so exposed were shot 
down, their places wore supplied by 
volunteers until these were exhausted, 
and it was necessary lor Gen. Strahl to 

■ all upon other-.. I le turned to me, and 
taough I was several feet back from the 

I r,se up immediately, and walk- 

\er the wounded ami dead, took 

p isition with one toot upon th-.: pile of 

l>0 lie- of my dead fellows, and tic other 

in the embankment, and Bred guns 
w hieh the General himself handed up to 
me until he, too, was shot down. One 
other man had bad position bu uij 1 

and assisted i:i the tiring. The" battle 
1 until not. an efficient man was li tt 
between us and the t olumbiaBike, about 
fifty yards to our right, and hardly 
1 nougll behind us to hand up the guns. 
We could not hold out muuu long, 1. for 
ind ed, but 1 w ol us were then 1. 1< aii\e. 
It seemed as if we had no choice but to 
in uder or try to get away, and when 
I aske I the General for counsel, be sim- 
ply answered, " Keep tiring.' i.ut just 
is tue man to my right was shot, and tell 
against me witn terrible groans, Gen. 
Strahl was shot. He threw up his hands, 
falling on his face, and I tliOUglt turn 

■ lead, hut in asking the dying man, 
who still lay against my shoulder t,s lie 
sank forever, how he was wounded, the 
( .en. ral, who had not been k ill. , I, think- 
ing my question was to him, raised up 
saying that he was shot in the neck, and 
called f«~r Col. Stafford to turn over his 
command. He crawled over thed.a.l, 
tne ditch being three deep, about twenty 
feet to where ( ol. Station! was. His 
Stall' Officers started to carry bun to the 
rear, but he received another Bhot, and 
directly the third, which killed him in- 
stantly. Col. Stafford was dead in the 
pile, as the morning light disclosed, w ith 
01s feet wedged in at the bottom, with 
other dead across and under him alter 
he fell, leaving his body half standing as 
if ready to give command to the chad I 

By that time but a handful of us were 
left on that part of the line.and as I was 
sure that our condition was not known, 
I ran to the rear to report to Gen. John 
C. Brown, commanding the division. I 
nut Major Hampton of his staff, who 
told me that Gen. Brown was wounded, 
and that Gen. Strahl was in command. 
This assured me that those in command 
did not know the real situation, so I 
went on the hunt for General Cheatham. 
By and by relief was sent to the front. 
This done, nature gave way. My shoul- 
der was black with bruises from tiring, 
and it seemed that no moisture was hit 
in my system. Utterly exhausted, 1 
sank upon the ground and tried to sleep. 
The battle was over, and I could do no 
rnsre ; but animated still with concern 
for the fate of comrades, I returned to 
the awful spectacle in search of some 
who year after year had beeu at my side. 
Ah, the loyalty of faithful comrades in 
such a struggle 1 



32 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



WELCOME TO VETERANS AT Fort sSUTrt. 



Editor Williams, of the Fort Smith, Ark., T, 
gave out this welt ome at the late reunion of that city : 

Welcome, Veterans! United Confederate Veterans, 

w eli ome ' 

Thrice welcome, seven times welcome — yea. a 
thousand times welcome to the Border City. 

Wc are of you and with you, and (lotl being our 
helper, we shall stand by you. 

The political questions that made it necessary for 
the Southern soldier to prove himself worthy of the 
name and fame of his patriotic ancestry wore settled 
in a soldierly way, and when settled, were settled for- 
ever: and that settlement was the deliverance we cel- 
ebrate. 

Vour four years of service under the stars and liars 
shed new luster upon our common country; and 
whether on the driven march or in the tented field, in 
the hour of victory or in sore defeat, your re. ord adds 
new splendor to American .history. 

The Southern soldier challenges the world for a 
milder achievement upon the battlefield. Oak Hills 
ami l-'lk Horn. Pea Kidge and I'rairie drove, Poiso- 
Springs and the Post of Arkansas— fields of carnage 
made sacred by the Mood of as brave a soldier as ever, 
dealt death at Thermopylae, or bore a polished spear 
for Sparta. 

Back in the homes you fought for were the tremu- 
lous hands that lilessed your heads, the motherly lips 
that bade von he brave and trust in heaven, the loving 
arms and tearful eyes that told you to do your duty 
and leave the rest to ( !od. 

How noblv vim did tliat duty all the world knows. 
In marble and bronze posterity shall read it, and 
tongues tipped with lire from the altar of all that is 
pure and holy, shall tell it to the ages to come, am! 
when the everlasting stream of time shall reach the 
great ocean of eternity's wealth, the character of the 
Southern soldier will tower grandly above all that 
linds lodgement there. 

In the days of your youthful- vigor, when the eye 
was clear and the sinews strong and supple, with 
swelling hearts and blushing pride you donned the 
sombre gray. In your later years you have put on 
another gray of whiter hue Worn and weary the 
world hears heavily on you. Bent and tired you pick 
your doubtful way. No grateful government helps to 
hear your burden. No monthly pension aids your 
tottering steps. No place of profit is set apart for 
vour easement. No exemption from the general load 
is vours. But you have the proud consciousness of 
duty nobly done, and the blessings of that line of 
patriots of which Washington was one, Jeff Davis an- 
other, and Lee and Jackson a sainted two. 

The divine right of kin^s passed awav with cruel 
despotism, but the divine blood of American patriots 
(lows on forever, and you, Confederate Veterans, are 
in the line of noble succession ; and all the winds and 
all the waters of this wicked world cannot deprive 
you of one atom of your glorious heritage. 

By the quips of fortune, and thClove that lingers 
one for another of those who worshipped at a common 
shrine and resigned themselves t» a common sorrow, 
you have come together in our city, in the name of 
whose people of all creeds we welcome you. In their 
business and social relations the people of Fort Smith 
know neither politics nor religion, but in their love of 



country they believe the cause of good government . 
best subserved where .the people worship according to 
the dictates of their conscience, and celebrate freely 
the anniversaries of the .lavs they love. Sin lies not 
in pleasure but in excess. 'Fort Smith swings all her 
gates open to you. On the vine there is vet a cluster, 
: ' n ' "» the fig tree Mill hangs some luscious fruit. 
Make yourselves comfortabte. He freeandeasy; and 
if in need of help sound the revielle— a city is at vour 
service. 



KENTUCKY STATE GUARD WAR SOKG. 



lain^ forth the flag, Kentucky's noble standard. 
, > Wa\ e .1 ... high tui II,.. wind shakes each fold .mi ; 
■))■■. dly ii floats, nobly waving In tbe van-guard, 

Then cheer up. boys, cheer, with a lusty, long bold snout. 

l Hums : 
Cheer, boys, cheer, we'll march away to hattle— 

cheer, buys, cheer, for our sweethearts and mir wives— 
i heer, boys, cheer, we'll nobly do our duly, 

Ami give Kentucky our hearts, our arms, our lives. 

Although we marc' with heads all lowly hen. line. 

Let us Implore a blessing from on high ; 
(Hi. 'use is just, the right from wrong defending, 

Anil I he Coil of battled will listen to our cry.— Uho. 

Though to our homes we never may return, 
Ne'er press again our loved ones in our arms— 

I Cer our lone graves their faithful hearts will mourn, 
Then cheer up. hoys, cheer, such death has ilnims. . n<>. 

s.e. hoys, sec. the thunder clou. is before us. 

Hear tin- loud crash of musketry and gun 
Bring forth the tlaa and proudly wave It o'er us— 

Then cheer up. hoys, cheer, for the victory Is won I ho. 

Note.— Sung in the "Camps" of the First Kentucky Itrigade Ii 
fantry durtngthe war, 1801 (15, and since reprinted for Charles Herbal 
who was of/the Second Kentucky Infantry. 



MRU. M. IK PI fill's APPEAL. 



The Ladies' Memorial Association, which rocked tin 
cradle of the Confederacy at Montgomery, and hr 
ever maintained an active life, has had two Presidents 
the late venerable widow of Judge Benijah Bibb, am 
their daughter, Mrs. M. 1 >. Bibb, a worthy suceessot 
The latter, in connection with a programme for an en- 
tertainment in behalf of the Davis Monument, wrote,,' 

We earnestly appeal to the patriotic people of the 
city and country, old men and matrons, young men 
and maidens, to unite with us in rendering this occa- 
sion a most brilliant success. Surely a cause which 
called into action all that was noble in human nature, 
lofty patriotism and sublime courage, self-sacrificing 
devotion and heroic endurance, commands the grate- 
ful homage of every Southern heart. Could we make 

i e fitting offering than to build a monument to 

the illustrious chieftain, in whom was concentrated 
all these \ irtucs, and who was made a vicarious sacri- 
fice upon the altar of the Confederacy? 

We trust that Montgomery, the fi'st capital of the 
nation whose brief existence tills the most brilliant 
and pathetic page in history, will prove true to her 
noble birthright, and render tribute to the hero and 
statesman, whom the world will yet claim as one of 
the grandest and best of the sons of men. 

May we not hope that the gallant men and noble 
women of our city will supplement the efforts of the 
Ladies' Memorial Association in making an offering 
worthy of n cause so great, by their generous patron- 
age a pc hi 'ring presence. 



Qopfederat^ l/eterap. 

■ ■ — — ■ — *~^fe-l 

Published Monthly in the Interest of Confederate Veterans ancw&ndred Topics. 

Price 5 Cents. \ \ r i y 
Yearly 50 Cents. J* V Oi. 1..*- 



Nashville, Tenn., February, 1893. No. 2. 



fS. A. CUNNINGHAM 
I Editor and Manager. 



THIS journal will interest you. Its merit ami nrvd are Bet forth 
on page* 86-38. Join the throng. Subscribe for it at once. Ad- 
vertise through the South in it a1 si an inch, one and two issues 
free for six and twelve months. Get your home paper to review it. Fur- 
nish data for publication in short, true stories, humorous as well as tragic, 
Write of the Davis Monument. Confederate Homes and Cemeteries. 





CONFEDERATE MONUMENT AT NASHVILLE" TENN. SEE PAGE 62. 



HI II 1» I II I MOX1 Ml N I 

Build up a shaft to Davis ! Lrt it tower to the Bkies. 
Let those who fell in battle see the stately colu won 

riee. 
'Twill represent the cauBe they loved, the cause 

they d»ed to save, 
And shadow forth our deep respect for every sol- 
dier's grave. .. 
For right or wrong, our brethren fell on every 

bloody field, 
They 'hought the cause they loved was just, and 

.eeling so, to yield 
AVere baser than all baseness Is, and greater to be 

feared • 
Than all the guns that ever roared since heaven's 

light appeared. 

For DaTis neither better was nor worse than those 

he led ; 
He Mmply represented all we did, or thought, or 

said. 
He was the chieftain of our State, the leader of our 

band, 
Duly chosen from amongst us, to assume and give 

command. 
lie erred ? It was but human. Which of us that 

has not erred? 
When we made him chief in power, we assumed 

his every word. 
So far as it had bearing on the common cause, we 

knew ; 
And all his acts as chief of State were ordered in 

our view. 

He failed to win the aim he sough ( ? Why 'twas 

the State that failed. 
They thrust him into dungeons — every man he led 

was jailed. 
The irons that upon his weak and wasted limbs he 

wore 
Were those that as their chief of State he for his 

people bore. 
The criticism and abuse he silently endured, 
Were only of the nature that his chieftaincy 

insured. 
And shall we now forget the men who suffered in 

our stead ? 
Corel be the craven spirit who deserts hits household 

dead I 

We yet are in our father's house ; we lov our 

country's flag. 
Long may its folds unchallenged fly on sea and 

moan tain crag 1 
Long may Columbia's gonfalon float proudly to the 

breeze ! 
And let no man with angry hand tho sacred em- 
blem seize. 
But let us grieve over every wound wherein our 

country bled. 
We love the brave of every faith ; we mourn our 

gallant dead. 
Secure against fraternal hate they sleep beneath the 

sod, 
The Lord of Hosts hath summoned them. Their 

fame is safe with God. 

William C. Forske. 
Kansas City, Mo. 



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Pnblislicd Monthly jji the Interest of Confederate I'eterans and Kindred Topics. 



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Vol. I. Nashvili.k, Thnn., February, 1893. No. 2. 



fS. A. CUNNIMiHAM 
I Editor and Manager. 



Entered at the Postoffice, Nashville, Tenn., as Becond-class matter. 

Special club rates to the PreBS and no lamps— 25 copies MO. 

An extra copy sent to each person who sends six subscriptions. 

Advertisements : One dollar per Inch one time, or sin a year, ex- 
cent last page; $-.!"> a page. Discount: Half year, one-eighth; one 
\ ."ir, one-fourth. 

Your attention! This second number of the Con- 
federate Veteran greets many new readers. Hun- 
dreds of subscriptions have been given upon the splen- 
did reputation given it by patriotic people who saw 
the first issue. Sec thf testimonials on pages 36 38, 
inclusive, and elsewhere. It is a most remarkable 
record. If you favor the sentiments expressed, and 
the little journal entertains you, won't you lie practi- 
cal and pay a half-dollar for it'.' Some fellow journal- 
ists are so anxious for its SUCCESS they have subscribed. 
The metropolitan papers have reviewed it generously. 

Personal friends should nut expect the compliment 
of a specimen copy repeated. On seeing how zealous 
strangers are. surely you will have the courtesy to ac- 
knowledge receipt of copy, if ii" more. The publica- 
tion is the sole property of S. A. Cunningham. His 
engagement on salary as general agent for the l»avis 
Monument Fund ended, according to previous agree- 
ment, with January, bul he expects to land every 
nerve, just the same, until the great work is completed. 

There are only two sources of revenue to the publi- 
cation, subscriptions and advertisements. It is the 
cheapest first-class publication in America. Anybody 
can afford to take it. It' every zealous friend would 
solicit advertising from people who want to reach everj 
part of the South, the Confederate Veteran would 
at once become one of the most prosperous publica- 
tions in existence. One dollar pays for an inch space. 
Please be diligent to secure subscriptions and adver- 
tisements, by commending it upon its merits only. 

Contributors to the monument fund are certainly 
friendly to this enterprise, and deserve complimentary 
subscriptions, but it must work its own way. and their 
co-operation is earnestly solicited. 

In the next issue it is designed to use some attract- 
ive illustrations. Let comrades furnish, briefly as 
possible, humorous reminiscences. Let us live over 
again the incidents that gave sunshine on dark days. 



Whatever may be desirable to put before represent- 
ative people of the entire South and our people else- 
where may he printed ad vantageously in the CONFED- 
ERATE Veteran. 



The personal relations between Jefferson Davis and 
Alexander H. Stephens having never been well under- 
stood, even in the South, the writer once on a visit to 
Beau voir expressed a desire for information in regard 
to it. Mr. Davis replied cordially by relating an amus- 
ing incident: .^prisoner at Anderson ville had writ- 
ten Mr. Stephens, expressing a conviction that he had 
conceived a plan whereby the war might be speedily 
terminated, giving to the South her independence. 
Mr. Stephens was so impressed that he wrote Mr. I >a\ i>. 
requesting that the man be given his liberty, wherebj 
such conception might be considered in official coun- 
cil; and not having r lived a reply to his letter, Mr. 

Stephens wrote a complaint in angered spirit some 
weeks afterwards. Mr. Davis replied that he had de- 
layed answering the letter in order to investigate the 
reputation of the prisoner, and ascertained that there 
was no reason why importance should be given any 
theory of his; and, moreover, that he was already 
dead. This is the only unpleasant thing that ever oc- 
curred between them of a personal nature. 



What an extraordinary man was Alexander H. 
Stephens! His physical debility intensified interest 

in him. Late in life he told me that ho hardly re- 
membered the time when lie exported to live longer 
than two years. Frail as he w ;is. however, and poor 
at the start. — his education having been furnished on 
credit, — he possessed a will power and mental acuteness 
that enabled him to rise out of poverty to affluence 
and to eminence. During about half of his life, of 
three score ami ten years, he was in public service as 
state and national legislator, as Vice President of the 

Confederate States, and. last of all, as Governor of 
Georgia, in which commonwealth he was born and 

died. 

Mr. Stephens educated about lift v v voung men before 
the war and half as many after it. His general career 
is well known history. When I first met him, a few 
years before his death, he was at Catoosa Springs, near 
Tunnel Hill, Ga. 1 had gone there to confer with 
him about his contemplated visit to Chattanooga, 
where preparations had been made to give him a grand 
reception. He had abandoned the trip because the 
wife of his favorite nephew, John A. Stephens, had 
sprained her ankle, and an old black woman at Craw- 
fordville, formerly his slave, had a lawsuit and no 
money to employ a lawyer. To get home and plead her 



34 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



cause, his decision was irrevokable about going home 
on the afternoon of the next day. He was induced, 
however, to go into Chattanooga in the forenoon, ac- 
cept the hospitality of the city, and take the evening 
train for Crawfordville, which he did. There were 
thousands of people to greet him, but no persuasion 
could induce him tn neglect the lawsuit, and he went 
home as he had planned. 

( hatting with him one day. I expressed surprise 
that he opposed Greeley so persistently for the Presi- 
dency, when it was indirectly advancing the claims 
of General Grant, who it seemed might have exercised 
better influence for the South as President. He be- 
came animated in praising Grant, and then, changing 
the subject suddenly, he asked if I had read the life 
of his l.iotlier. Linton Stephens. "Nay" being the 
answer, he rolled his chair — he could not walk in his 
later years — to a table in his room covered with slips 
of white paper, and told his black servant. " Alex." to 
get him a postal card, across the address side of which 
In- wrote an order to his publishers in Atlanta, which 
1 was to carry in person the next day for a copy of the 
book. Amused at his using the postal card in such a 
way, and wishing his autograph, I remarked that 1 
would show them the order, hut would like to retain it. 
"Well," he exclaimed, "if you wish to do that, I will 
try and write it better!" and he so defaced another 
postal, both of which are still preserved. The last 
time I saw this able patriot and statesman was a few 
nights before his death. He had gone to bed, and re- 
ceived me in his chamber at the Executive Mansion, 
Atlanta, lie was almost half silting, propped by great 
pillows under shoulders and head. The picture of 
snow white linen and the pale, emaciated face which 
gave a contrast to the large black eyes, is indellible. 
Although not safe in party loyalty, his wisdom and 
personal integrity created and maintained for him a 
reputation that will he augmented as it is reproduced 
in the lives of great men. One of his last acts as Gov- 
ernor was the pardon of a noted criminal, and in reply 
to a criticism by a prominent New Yorker, who con- 
cluded his letter, "1 did so admire you once; why 
have you done this senseless, evil tiling?" he wrote: 
"Of one thing you may he assured: my act in the 
matter meets with the full approval of my own con- 
science." It is my fortune to have in part the diary 
of his prison life at Fort Warren, and a part of it may 
he expected in the next ConkkdkhatE VETERAN. 



statement from a hoy soldier, as the general was riding 
by, he would give the commissary notice that such 
must not occur again when possible t>> avoid it. 

On Hood's march into Tennessee, Cheatham was 
commander of a corps, and yet he was general wagon- 
master of his command whenever trouble occurred 
with the train. As the army passed down Sand Moun- 
tain, some of the wagons had mired in the valley 
ahead. The general was making his way down the 
steep mountain in the darkness, where the men were 
piled in the roadway asleep. Working his way on 
patiently for 'some time, and feeling that he must go 
on. he exclaimed, "D — n it, hoys, you know I don't 
want to ride over you!" 



Tins pathetic incident is recalled in connection with 
Gen. frank Cheatham: He was always extremely 
popular with the soldiers. While many a private was 
repelled by the austere manner of his colonel or brig- 
adier, he would apply to "Mais Frank" for relief 
against any grievance, assured of immediate attention. 
For instance, if rations were short, upon the simple 



The late Hon. L. Q. C. Lamar was one of the most 
remarkable men that the South ever produced. He 
commanded not only the respect, hut the esteem, of 
the North. His thrilling oratory and his undaunted 
courage were leading characteristics. A Republican 
journalist wrote: "I was anxious to know something 
of his experiences when the diplomatic agent of the 
Southern Confederacy sought the aid of France and 
England, lie chatted pleasantly on this phase of his 
career, and among other things said: 'We lost our 
cause, but we won the respect of the world by our 
courage, our endurance, and our devotion. Europe 
had long regarded the Southerners, I think, as a lot of 
braggarts. We had talked and t hreatened much. When 
the war came we were equal to it. We made a proud 
name lor ourselves, and I can honestly say that I 
would rather be where we are to-day, with an unex- 
ampled record, than to be back where we were before 
the war. with our slaves.' " 

While he was a Senator, in a discussion of the pen- 
sion arrears bill, Senator Hoar, of Massachusetts, of- 
fered a proviso that ''no pension should ever be paid 
to .Jefferson Davis." Mr. Lamar indignantly resented 
the insult, and, after being called to order, said: "Now, 
sir, I do not wish to make any remarks here that will 
engender any excitement or discussion, but 1 say that 
the Senator from Massachusetts connected that name 
with treason. We all know that the results of the war 
have attached to the people of the South the technical 
crime of rebellion, and we submit to it, but that was 
not the sense in which the gentleman used that term 
as applied to Mr. Davis. He intended to ailix — I will 
not say he intended, but the inevitable effect of it was 
to affix upon this aged man, this man broken in for- 
tune, suffering from bereavement — an epithet of odium 
and imputation of moral turpitude. Sir, it required 
no courage to do that; it required no magnanimity to 
do it; it required no courtesy; it only required hate, 
bitter, malignant, sectional feeling, and a sense of per- 
sonal impunity. The gentleman, I believe, takes rank 
among Christian statesmen. He might have learned 
a better lesson, even from the pages of mythology. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



35 



When Prometheus was bound to the rock it was not 
an eagle — it was a vultun — that buried his beak in 
the tortured vitals of the victim." 



Mrs. V. Jefferson Davis in her Memoirs gives an 
interesting sketch of the Howell family. Her grand- 
father, Maj. Richard Howell, fought in the battles of 
the Revolution. He helped to destroy tea landed by 
the " Greyhound " al Greenwich, N. J., in November, 
1774. In 177"> be was captain of a company. In 177o 
he was promoted to major, and commanded his bat- 
talion in several successful engagements. He had a 
furlough to go, and was in the act of starting, to see 
his twin brother, Surgeon Lewis Howell, who was dy- 
ing, the day before the battle of Monmouth, hut waited 
and went into the engagement as a private in citizens 
clothes. Gen. Washington commended him for his 
personal sacrifice. Having waited for the battle, he 
never saw his brother alive any more. 

In 17.S.S Maj. Howell was appointed Clerk of the 
Supreme Court, which position he held until his elec- 
tion as Governor of New Jersey, and was continued 
for eight years, when he dec lined to he a candidate on 
account of impaired health. He died in 1802. His 
daughter Sarah was one of the dozen young ladies 
selected to scatter Sowers in Washington's path at 
Trenton bridge. 

Mrs. Davis' lather. William Burr Howell, fourth son 
of < rov. Howell, was appointed an officer in the Marine 
Corps, and served under Commodore Decatur in the 
War of 1812. In a close engagement his scat — a stool 
— was shot from under him, and another ball knocked 
from his grasp a tin-CUp of water. I [e was commended 
in orders three times for gallantry in action. After 
the war was over, in 1815, he went down the Missis- 
sippi in a llatboat to Natchez. He met and became 
intimate with Joseph E. Davis, brother of Jefferson 
Davis. In 1823 Mr. Howell married Miss Margaret 
Louisa Kempe. Joseph Davis acted as groomsman, 
and the first child born to the couple was named Joseph 
Davis. "Thus the intimacy grew apace and ripened 

into three intermarriages in three generations." 

Mr. and Mrs. Howell and their friend, Joseph E. 
Davis, went on along journey to t he North in 1825, 
and they together visited Mr. Davis' "little brothel" 
(Jefferson Davis) at West Point on the trip. Her 
father referred to him afterward as a "promising 
youth," and her mother spoke of "his open, bright 
expression," in a letter that was preserved. 

During his cadetship young Davis and a school com- 
panion went off on a little frolic without leave, and, 
hearing that one of the instructors was going to where 
they were, they started back by a near cut to the acad- 
emy, when young Davis fell over an embankment, a 
distance of about sixty feet, but happily he caught at 
a stunted tree, which broke the force of the fall. His 
companion, greatly distressed, leaned over the preci- 



pice and inquired, "Jeff, arc you dead'.'" It was al- 
most a fatal fall, and he was expected to die for weeks 
afterward. In this connection another story is told of 
Cadet Davis. One of the professors, who disliked him, 
was delivering a lecture one day upon the value to a 
soldier in having presence of mind under trial. He 
looked at young Davis significantly. A few days after- 
ward when tin 1 large class was being taught how to 
make fire-balls in a room full of explosives, one of 
(Ik in caught on tire. Instantly the uncongenial pro- 
fessor said, "Run for your lives!" and then did so 
himself. Young Davis instead threw it out of the 
window, thus saving the building and many lives. 
The modesty of the author deprives the interesting 
history of a full subsequent account of the Howell 
family as the public deserves. She supplemented the 
Howell name by becoming the wife of Jefferson Davis, 
February 26, 1845. 



SPIRIT "/ At'PEAL FOR THE DAVIS MEMORIAL. 



In an address to the Southern people, this 

committee has ratified the preference expressed by 
Mrs. Davis for Richmond, V*a., a- the proper site for 
such memorial. It has determined that not less than 
.«'_>;.i i.i k k i shall be raised for that purpose, and that 
there shall be an organization in every state in the 
South, through which the offerings of the people may 
flow to the accomplishment of this patriotic and pious 
work. Continuing its appeal the committee say: 

"This money will be raised speedily. This monu- 
ment will rise, and soon, to be an everlasting 
memorial, not only to the patriot and statesman who 
purely and bravely led your fortunes in the times that 
wrung your souls, but of the ineffable valor and 
devotion of the most heroic soldiery which the world 
ever saw, whom he typified while he commanded. 

" No other hands than ours can be relied upon to put 
stones upon this pile. Our own hard-earned mite 
must mainly accomplish its rearing. Our own sweat 
must chiefly stream upon its uplifting. 

" If our poverty has been and continues to be great, 
it has at least made us rich in love for each other. If 
our lives have been one long tale of sacrifice, and 
threaten more, the most willing of those to come must 
be that one which will keep green forever the memo- 
ries of our loved land and of our dead brothers. 

" Cove and self-sacrifice build more monuments than 
money ever did or ever will, and we now gladly and 
confidently bid you to illustrate it. The men and the 
women who fought for the Confederacy and their de- 
scendants, must quarry this monument out of their 
heart's blood if need be. It were best in every case 
that they should. There is not a discordant clement 
anywhere. Let us all be at work ! » 

"All remittances for this purpose should be made to 
John S. Ellett, President of the State Bank at Rich 
mond, Va., who is the bonded Treasurer of the gen- 
eral organization." 



Thanks to Dr. I). M. Goodner, of Fayetteville, Tenn., 
for efficient service to solicitor for the Confederate 
Veteran. 



36 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



FUIKNDI.Y To THE CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



NOTES VROM TBS MULTITUDE OF KIND TBINQB WRIT- 
TEN AND PRINTED. 



George F. Miller, Indianapolis, [nd., "read it with 
much pleasure," and sends two subscriptions. 

II. B.Stoddard, Adjutant General Texas Division. 
I'. ('. V., Bryan: " Will send you a few subscribers; it 
fills a long felt want." 

Otis S. Traver, Sanford, Fla. : " Inclosed I send four 
subscriptions. Keep me posted as to what 1 can do 
for you, and I will do it." 

In sending four subscriptions, Mrs. Joseph W. Allen. 
of Nashville, says: "You Ought to. anil 1 hope will, 
have one hundred thousand subscribers." 

Richard T. Purges, Esq., El Paso, Tex., Bends his 
subscription, " without waiting on a friend who is get- 
ting up a list." for fear he may miss a number. 

Mrs. .1. X. B., Fredericksburg, Ya.: "I have read 
your valuable Little magazine with great pleasure. I 
will take it around our city and solicit subscribers." 

R. H. Dykers, Waynesville, N. < '. : "1 am glad to see 
the flame of our sacred altars is burning so brightly, 
and hope that it will warm our hearts to great en- 
deavors." 

F. O'Brien. Berwick, La.: "Inclosed I semi $2, for 
four subscriptions. The want of just such a paper has 
long been felt. Will bring the matter before our Camp 
at next meeting." 

Dr. J. P. Cannon, of McKenzie, Tenn., says: "We 
must make the Veteran a success: we need such a 

paper, and I am glad you have undertaken the task 
of giving a good, cheap paper." 

Col. John G. Ryan, Chicago, 111.: "It reflects great 
credit. I send 'the widow's mite. 1 Send a few sam- 
ple copies. When I see any of the 'old Confed.' boys, 
will call attention to their duty." 

K. F. Peddicord, Vice President First District Ex- 
Confederate Association of Missouri: "Have just re- 
ceived copy of Confederate Veteran, and am pleased 
with it; inclosed find three subscriptions." 

Mrs. P. P. II., Pewee Valley, Ky. : "You certainly 
deserve the co-operation of everybody in the South. 
Send me two or three extra copies, and I will do my 
best to get you as many subscribers as I can." 

James G. Holmes, Charleston, S. C: "Herewith 
find a list of fourteen subscribers, with New York ex- 
change. A copy of your excellent paper came to my 
hand accidentally, and after reading it I determined 
to subscribe and aid you by obtaining others." 

Gen. G, P. Thruston, of Nashville, Tenn., who was 
Chief of Staff to Gen. Rosecrans, and was afterward 
with Gen. George II. Thomas, on the Union side: "I 
have read the Veteran. It tells its story in a kind, 
fraternal spirit. Inclosed find amount of the sub- 
scription." 

Dr. J. Wm. Jones, Atlanta, G a. : "I regard the first 
issue as an admirable one. * * * I have every rea- 
son to believe that you will make thi Confederate 
Veteran a valuable mediu f communication be- 
tween Confederate Camps, a pleasant reminder of old 
scenes and memories, a valuable historic record of the 
brave old days of 'f)l-'lif>. Whatever I can do to help 
you shall be freely done." 



In sending subscriptions for himself and the Con- 
federate Veteraf) Camp, of New York, Maj. Edward 
Owen says:. "It is a very good and useful paper to 
( ionfederates." 

Dr. \V. N. Cunningham. Mansfield, La. : "As an evi- 
dence of my appreciation of your enterprise, and my 
desire for its success. I send five dollars, for which send 
three copies to the persons named, and the others to 
our Camp. I want these for veterans who are unable 
to subscribe." 

Gen. John Boyd, Lexington, Ky. : "I am very much 
pleased with the Veteran, ami, as the subscription is 
so low, no Confederate soldier should be without it. 

I hope to see the day that it will be like ' bitters 

— everybody takes it.' Inclosed find three subscrip- 
tions. I will do what I can for you." 

Gen. Stephen D. Lee, Agricultural College, Miss.: 
"I like it very much. The lack of such a journal has 
been long felt among old Confederates; such a means 
of communication is absolutely necessary. I inclose 
my subscription; and whenever I can help you, call 
on me, and I will do all in my power." 

A prominent "Veteran, Washington City: "I read 

every word in the January number, and can only say 
if subsequent publications equal it the paper will suc- 
ceed on its own merits. Individual canvassers will 
not be needed. I predict for it a successful future, and 
will give it a good word with Confederates here. I 
hope it will take and hold a high standard." 

Dr. \V. M. Yandell, El Paso, Texas, February 1 : " I 
enclose postal order for ten dollars to pay for enclosed 
list of twenty names. Hope to get you more next 
week. Send me ten copies of same to use in getting 
you ten more subscribers. Your first issue is splendid 
and worth more than the subscription for a year. I 
went out in the 'Orphan Brigade.' You shall have 
half a dollar for each subscriber — I don't want twenty- 
five for ten dollars." 

Of the many letters sent with clubs here is one from 
\V. D. Matthews, Jacksonville, Fla.: " 1 was so pleased 
with it that I thought I would get you a number of 
subscribers. After securing some I concluded to get 
one hundred, so we might have the benefit of a col- 
umn for our Camp as you propose." Then he adds: 
" Vim need make no apology for the Confederate 
Veteran. I have heard nothing but praise of this 
initial number." 

Gen. George Moorman, of New Orleans, who has 
done much more than any other man to organize the 
United Confederate Veterans' Brotherhood, writes: 
"You have greatly exceeded my expectations in the 
elegant and complete paper you have issued. So far 
it is the best Confederate paper I have seen since the 
war. It does great credit to your patience and ability 
and I hope your efforts will be crowned with com- 
plete success." 

M. S. Kahle, Cleburne, Texas, February 2d: "Capt. 
0. T. Plummer of our Camp handed me a copy of the 
Confederate Veteran. Its caption struck my heart 
and I immediately went to work. You are in a noble 
cause, a glorious work which will be felt in every Camp 
organization in our Sunny South. I have read it 
through and through and it has given me entire satis- 
faction. It will be a welcome visitor to my house, 
yea, thrice welcome. Find enclosed a list of twenty-five 
subscribers for your noble paper." 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



37 



Mrs. M. D. B., Montgomery, Ala.: "Its bright face 
and cheering words betoken the success it' so richly 
deserves. It has a noble mission to perforin in edu- 
cating the youth of our land to revere the memory and 
emulate the virtues of men whose self-sacrificing de- 
votion to the nation which rose so fair and fell with- 
out a stain, commands the admiration of the world. 
* * * I inclose two subscriptions." 

Rev. John R. Deering, now of Kentucky, who served 
in the Twelfth Mississippi Infantry, Army Northern 
Virginia, sends this letter: 

"Versailles, Ky., January 20, L893. 

"This is to thank you for the first issue of the CON- 
FEDERATE Veteran, and to approve and prais.' you 
for the noble undertaking. You deserve and will 
have the gratitude of every old soldier of the South, 
and that of their wives, mothers, sisters, and children. 
The Veteran is appreciated as a tribute to the valor 
of the living and as an evidence of the enduring affec- 
tion in which we hold our dead. It is valuable as an 
organ for encouragement and unification of our peo- 
ple in their great and sacrcil memorial work. It will 
inspire general effort and promote worthy and har- 
monious co-opcrat ion. The monument at Richmond 
should represent Mr. Davis as he represented our 
cause. I wish that it could be as magnificent as the 
courage of the men who fought for it. and as enduring 
as the devotion of the women who Buffered with them 
Ah! gold is not good enough where love and tears and 
blood were shed so lavishly. No man who knows 
what that memorial will stand for, or cares for its im- 
pressions upon the coming generations, would con- 
sider a million of money too much to erect and pro- 
tect'it. Let it be like the heroism and Buffering it 
recalls — the wonder and admiration of menl 

" Inclosed find a club of six subscribers to the Vet- 
bran, with check. Wishing you all the success you 
deserve, and holding myself ready to aid as I can. I 
am yours in the strongest bonds." 



[The Nashville American.) 

There is no page in the history of any people which 
should arouse deeper sentiments of love for its beroi B 
and admiration for their sacrifices than should the 
memories of the lost cause inspire in the hearts of 
the southern people for those who dedicated them- 
selves to its service. This feeling is strongly entrenched 
in the southern breast, yet it should be brought more 
to the surface, that it may not possibly grow less. A 
good publication has been needed to keep in activity 
these patriotic memories. This want is now supplied 
by a monthly publication entitled the Confederate 
VETERAN, published at Nashville, and edited by Mr. 
8. A. Cunningham. The first number has just been 
issued, and contains thirty-two pages replete with in- 
teresting articles, notes and memories pertaining to 
the great civil war. It is published in the interest of 
veterans in general and kindred topics, and is in- 
tended as an organ of communication between Confed- 
erate soldiers and those who are interested in them 
and their affairs, and its purpose is to furnish a volume 
of information which will be acceptable to the public, 
even to those who fought on the other side. Its price 
is fifty cents per annum. Its wide circulation will 
greatly promote the laudable objects of its publication. 
The first issue has not a page which does not contain 
interesting matter for the perusal of all Confederate 
veterans and the southern people generally. 



From the current issue it appears that the sum of 
$251 1,1 K K I is wanted to erect a monument to Jefferson 
Davis at Richmond, Ya. Commenting upon this sub- 
ject the Veteran says proud patriots ask this much. 
In our National Capital there is an equestrian bronze 
statue at nearly every turn to some hero of the war. 
but none of them are for our side. We should not lag 
behind in a matter which pertains so strongly to our 
patriotism and glory. Twice the above sum has been 
raised at the North for one individual monument. 
New ( Irleans has erected $150,000worth of Confederate 
monuments, and Richmond near that amount. The 
entire South should not hesitate in an undertaking to 
cost only $250,000. 

We bespeak for the new publication the hearty sup- 
port of the public. Its object appeals to our patriot- 
ism, to our glory, to our love for the memory of those 
who sacrificed their lives upon the altar of country, 
and to our respect for our chosen Chieftain, a pure 
type of heroic southern manhood, of whom it may be 
truly said, thai under the direst trial, and when in 
captivity, his proud spirit was as undaunted as when 
in supreme authority at his Capital, and that the 
honor and dignity of his country, entrusted to his 
keeping, had a noble custodian and defender. 

Mr. Cunningham, the editor of the Veteran, is 
zealously interested in the general purposes of the 
publication, and public support rendered him will be 
worthily bestowed. 

[The Nashville Mirror.] 

It seems tiding that so great a number ef "true and 
tried" men as comprise the Confederate veterans of 
to-day should have an organ through which informa- 
tion njay be conveyed to every section. That need 
seems to have been met in a practical way by the 
Confederate Veteran, as edited by Mr. S. A. Cun- 
ningham, whose initial signature. ' S. A. ('.." has been 
well known and popular in Tin Daily American for 
several years. Mr. Cunningham's service as general 
agent of the Davis Monument Fund for more than a 
yeai has given him a thorough knowledge of the need 
for an organ of Confederate veterans, and right well 
has he begun it. The January issue is brim full of 
good things, loyal in every thought to his comrades, 
vet so dignified and respectful to the other side as to 
command universal good will. The current number 
has many articles of value. 

[Nashville American, January 30.) 

Notice of The Confederate Veteran, published a 
week or so ago, may have seemed a little extravagant 
in a mere glance at the publication, but it has been a 
success throughout the Southern country. Without 
attempt at display Mr. Cunningham touched the 
hearts of southern people, without publishing a line 
offensive to others, and he showed the need of just 
such a publication, making it worthJ(^a place in any 
library, and so cheap that club rates nav«been ignored. 
Eminent women of the South have S\iM«cribed and are 
volunteer solicitors. 

[Farmlngton, Mo., Times.] 

It ought to receive the encouragement of all ex-Con- 
federates and others as well, who take a pride in com- 
memorating our heroes, whether they wore the blue or 
the gray. The brave deeds and noble sacrifices of the 
soldiers on both, sides bear the stamp of genuine 
American manhood and, alike, the heritage of a re- 
united, patriotic and prosperous people. Honor our 
dead heroes. 



38 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



[The Nashville Banner.] 

*** It is a very neat publication, contains much 
information and a variety of reading on subjects relat- 
ing to the Confederate Bide of the great civil war. Mr. 
Cunningham is an experienced newspaper man, and 
ha- a very extensive acquaintance throughout the 
South. Be is the agent for the Davis Monument 
Fund, and a gentleman so well deserving that his 
army of friends will heartily wish hi m success with 
his worthy publication. 

Fori Smith, Ark.. Dally Times.] 

It is full of delightful reading, is typographically 
clear and clean, and altogether pleasing. The price is 
only fifty cents a year, which ought to insure it a cir- 
culation equal in' number far greater than the num- 
ber of gray-haired Confederate veterans in the land. 
Every family of the South whose " vacant chair" is a 
memory of the Lost Cause should endeavor to hold 
up the hands of the editor of the CONFEDERATE VET- 
ERAN. 

[The Nashville Sunday Times.] 

Volume 1, Number 1, of this splendid paper is on 
our table, and does full credit to the South. Every 
family of our Southland should subscribe for and read 
it, for it will keep green dear and sacred memories, 
and will serve as an educator to the young upon issues 
with which all southerners especially should be fa- 
miliar. 

[The Memphis Commercial.] 

The Confederate Veteran is a new publication, 
right up in the van of current periodicals. It is de- 
voted to a noble cause, and is a very interesting, read-' 
able monthly, too. The Confederate Veteran has 
the Commercial's good will and godspeed upon its new- 
venture. 

[Lawrenceburg, Tenn., Democrat.] 

Such a publication has long been wanted and need- 
ed to keep active pure patriotic memories. We hope 
the VETERAN may live long to bring these dear mem- 
ories to mind of the southern veteran. 

[Benton, Ark., Courier.] 

.The title is an index to its contents, and we advise 
every ex-Confederate to subscribe. We will send the 
Saline Courier and Confederate Veteran to any ad- 
dress on receipt of $1.25. 

[Nashville Christian Advocate] 

It is full of interesting matter and ought to have a 
wide circulation. We think that we detect in it the 
hand of our good friend, Mr. S. A. Cunningham. 

[The Lovejoy, Oa., Picayune.] 

Every southern man should subscribe fortius paper 
— only fifty cents a year — and aid its editor in his 
grand work for the Jeff Davis Monument Fund. 



FROM GEN. W. I.. CABELL. 

The IJeutejjlanV General commanding the Trans- 
Mississippi l>r>par,tment of the United Confederate Vet- 
erans, writes as follows: 

"Dallas, Texas, January 17, 1893. 
"The Confederate Veteran (I am glad to see that 
you dropped the 'ex'), for January, was received to- 
day. Being confined to the house with a bad cold, I 
have read every word of it, and several times I imag- 
ined I was talking to some old comrade, of glorious old 
Mars Jell', of Generals bee, Albert Sydney Johnston, 
Stonewall Jackson, and other old heroes, as everything 
seem,., | so fresh ami so truthful, that 1 lived for a few 



hours in the past, and forgot that 1 was sick and un- 
able t" l'o Out in the cold. 

"The letter written by that noble lady (God bless 
her! i of Americus, Georgia,— Mrs. Louise My rick, — is 
worth more than live years' subscription. Every word 
she has written shows her to be a true southern woman, 
one who is proud of the South, proud of her State, and 
proud of the gallantry and services of the old Confed- 
erate soldier, both living and dead. She says there is 

'nothing too g 1 for the old soldier.' The soldier 

who 'fought and spilled his blood in defense of the 
South has no pensions,' but he must look for relief to 
sympathetic southern friends. Now, this is also true. 
Thank God, the old soldiers who wore the gray want 
no pensions from the Government. Cur people can 
not only take care of them while living, but when 
dead will wreath in garlands the laurel and other rare 
southern Mowers and place them on his grave every 
year. The true people of the South will never forget 
the old Confederate soldier. The sons and daughters 
of these noble old heroes and glorious southern women 
will never forget the heroism of their fathers and the 
trials and Bufferings their glorious mothers had to en- 
dure. I am proud to know that we have such true 
ladies all over the South. . 

"I must change my subject, as I find that I could 
almost fill your paper if I were to write as I feel in 
reference to our duty to the living Confederate soldier. 
In this State we have made ample provision for him, 
and will take care of him until he is called to attend 
the last ' tattoo.' 

"I am glad to see that some interest is manifesting 
itself in reference to the Jeff Davis Monument Fund. 
In a few weeks we will send a pretty good sum to # our 
treasurer in Richmond. I hope that you will stir 
them up all along the line. This State I have divided 
into five districts, and all are at work I am inclined 
to think that our Camps will average (&100) one hun- 
dred dollars each, not only in this State, where we 
have (120) one hundred and twenty Camps, but also 
in the Indian Territory and Arkansas. A number of 
new Camps have been organized in Arkansas, and also 
in this State, and will, no doubt, join the Association 
of United Confederate Veterans in time to be with us 
at Birmingham on the 19th and '20th of July. * * * 
"Your friend and comrade, W. L. Cabell " 



Dr. Cicero It. Barker, of Salisbury, N. C, in send- 
ing check for $1:5.50 with twenty-seven names, states: 
" We don't want club rates for such a paper and such 
a cause." 

Col. J. F. Bryant, of Franklin, Va., seeing a notice 
in the Richmond Dispatch, secured a sample copy, 
sends subscription, and will solicit the co-operation 
of his Camp. He adds: " I like the first number very 
much, and think it richly deserves the hearty sym- 
pathy and support of the entire South." 

Capt. J. L. Lemon, Acworth, Ga. : "I am glad to 
know you are meeting with such success It will be 
taken from Maine to Texas. When I have time I will 
increase your list." 

Miss Mary Desha, Washington, D. ('., after having 
subscribed ami read it : "I shall be delighted to do all 
I can." 

Many beautiful tributes are not included in the fore- 
going, but they are sufficient to satisfy everybody that 
there is need for the Confederate Veteran, and that 
it starts in the right way. 






CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



39 



CAUSE OF CONFEDERATES IN MARYLAND. 



AN HONORED RECORD OF FAITHFUL MEN AND WO.VEX. 



The Society of the Army and Navy of the Confed- 
erate States in the State of Maryland, was organized 
in 1871. Its ohject is to preserve the material for a 
truthful history of the late war between the Confed- 
erates States and the United States of America; to 
honor the memory of our comrades who have fallen ; 
to cherish the ties of friendship among those who sur- 
vive, and to fulfill the duties of sacred charity towards 
those who may stand in need of them. 

In 1874, with the aid of an appropriation from the 
State of Maryland, the bodies of Marylanders who fell 
in the Confederate service, were gathered from all the 
battlefields, from Petersburg to Gettysburg. Comrades 
were employed for this purpose, and brave soldiers 
were taken from fence corners and hedge rows where 
they had been laid. These bodies were reintered in 
the Confederate lot in Loudon Park Cemetery, where 
are erected the central monument, " The Confederate 
Soldier," by Volck, and the monuments to Companies 

H and A of the First and Sec 1 Maryland Infantry. 

and that dashing Cavalryman. Lieut-Col. Harry Gil- 
mor. This beautiful plot contains about four hundred 
bodies. It is the property of the Society, and pro\ is- 
ion has been made for its perpetual care, by payments 
to the cemetery company. About ten thousand dol- 
lars has been expended upon this work. The bodies 
of all Confederate prisoners who died in Baltimore are 
also buried in our lot, and each grave is marked with 
a marble headstone, with the name, regiment and 
State, whenever known, of the soldier who sleeps be- 
neath. Since 1873 the Society has always arranged 
for the observance of Memorial Day, June 6th, when 
hundreds of ladies and our comrades arc conveyed to 
Loudon Park Cemetery, to strew flowers on the graves 
of our dead, and the graves of our soldiers and sailors 
in other cemeteries also receive like attention. 

The Society has done much more than this: 

In 1878 about $1,000 was realized by means of a 
Musical Festival, for the Lee Monument at Richmond. 

In 1880 a life size statue of a Maryland Confederate 
Infantry Soldier was erected by the Society in the 
Maryland lot in the Stonewall Cemetery at Winches- 
ter, Virginia. 

In 1882 a donation of about $l>00 was made to the 
Southern Historical Society, Richmond, which enabled 
that Society to continue its work at that time. 

In 1885 a bazaar, held under the auspices and pat- 
ronage of the Society, realized about $31,000, which 
was invested in an annuity fund, terminating in twen- 
ty-five years, producing a present annual income of 
about $2,700, which is distributed, in cash, to needy 
and worthy comrades, and is also used for the burial 
of the dead. No Confederate soldier is denied assist- 



ance while living, nor permitted in death to lie in a 
pauper's grave. No matter how unfortunate his cir- 
cumstances in life, a respectful burial, with proper at- 
tendance, in the Confederate lot is accorded him. 

The Beneficial Association of the Maryland Line 
also dispenses among its needy members or their fam- 
ilies about $1,000 per annum, making total disburse- 
ments each year nearly $4,000. 

In 188(5 a monument was erected on Culp's Hill, 
Gettysburg, to the Second Maryland Infantry. It is 
massive granite block, costly and imposing, and its in 
scriptions testify the valor of the men who fought 
where it stands. 

In 1888 the former United States Arsenal buildings 
at Pikesville were secured from the Legislature of 
Maryland as a Confederate Home, with an appropria- 
tion of $5,000 a year. The rooms have been furnished 
as memorial offerings, and the Home now shelters in- 
mates from different States, but citizens of Maryland 
at time of entry. 

From time to time many addresses have been de- 
livered by distinguished Confederates, and numerous 
pamphlets have been published by the Society. 

The only stated public appearances of the Society 
are at annual banquets and on Memorial Days. It 
has made no public parades, except on the occasions of 
dedications of monuments at Richmond, Lexington, 
Winchester, Front Royal, Staunton, Hagerstown, 
Frederick and Gettysburg, or at the funerals of distin- 
guished comrades. 

The So, let y now numbers above 1,000 members, the 
annual dues being $1. An accurate record of e.-n h 
member, certified by commanding officers or comrades, 
18 entered in the Historical Register of the Society. 
No unworthy soldier or deserter is permitted to be- 
come a member. 

The sons of Confederate soldiers and sailors are en- 
titled to membership in the Society. as "male descend- 
ants." upon arriving at the age of fifteen years. 

All persons who are in sympathy with ourcause,but 
who were not in the service of the Confederate States, 
are eligible to "auxiliary membership." 

The successive Presidents have been: Maj.-Gen. 
Isaac R. Trimble, 1871 ; Maj. John R. McN'ulty, 1875 ; 
Lieut. Mellenry Howard, 1883; Gen. Bradley T. John- 
son, 1883. Gen. Johnson is now President. 

The annual report for last year shows how much 
practical good is being done. This is from it: 

* * * During the vear the committee has expended 
(2,663.38 in relieving the necessities of our sick and 
destitute comrades and in burying our dead. Of this 
amount $2,509.38 has been taken from the Confeder- 
ate Relief Bazaar Fund and $154 from the treasury, of 
the Beneficial Association of the Maryland Line. 

During the year relief has been granted to 202 per- 
sons, being six less than the previous year. Of this 
number 190 have been relieved from the Confederate 
Relief Bazaar fund and twelve from the treasury of the 



40 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



Beneficial Association. We have buried fifteen com- 
rades during the year. 

The members of the committee, with a few excep- 
tions, have shown great interest in the work in which 
we arc engaged, ami the rarity of cases of distress 
among ex-Confederates is due. in a great measure, to 
the labor of the members of this committee. The 
thanks of the committee are due to those members of 
the Confederate societies who have assisted the com- 
mittee by acting as pall-bearers at funerals and assist- 
ed us in many other ways. 



THK BIRTHDAY OF LEE. 



ANNUAL 1>I.\.\ER IN HIS HONOR BY THE CONEEDERATE 
VETERAN CAMP OF SEW YORK. 



The Confederate Veteran Camp of New York gave 
its third annual banquet January 19th, Gen. Lee's 
birthday. 

Among the distinguished guests present were Mrs. 
V. Jefferson Davis and daughter, Miss Winnie. The 
Camp arose in honor of the "first woman," and the 
" daughter of, the Confederacy." 

There was on the stage a large oil painting of Gen. 
Lee. Major Edward Owen managed the proceedings 
with high credit. 

Of the responses by guests invited who could not 
attend, Mr. Cleveland wrote: " It would give me great 
pleasure to accept your invitation if other engage- 
ments permitted, but the eares and duties now press- 
ing upon my time are too numerous to permit of my 
attendance." 

Mr. Cleveland's name was heartily cheered, and so 
was that of T. W. Topham, commander of U. S. Grant 
Post, G. A. It., who wrote: "I should be glad to help 
honor the memory of one of America's greatest sol- 
diers." A similar statement from Gen. McMahon was 
also applauded heartily. 

One of the leading speakers, ex-Gov. Thompson, of 
South Carolina, in speaking of Lee, said: "He was 
not misled by military politicians. In one of his let- 
ters he wrote. L I can conceive of no greater evil than 
the dissolution of the Union.' When he returned to 
Virginia all his pride and devotion to the army in- 
spired him to remain with it. He was told he could 
have command of the Union Army if he remained. 
This was a dazzling offer. But he believed that his 
first duty was to Virginia, and when Virginia called 
he felt it his duty to answer without regard to per- 
sonal considerations." 

The speaker paid an eloquent tribute to (Jen. Lee's 
virtues, his Christian character, his resignation in the 
hour of defeat, his courage and breadth of mind. In 
closing Mr. Thompson said: " I deem it fortunate that 
we have lived to see this day — never again to see 
brother arrayed against brother. We are fortunate to 
have lived to sec what Grant prayed for and Lee la- 
bored for." 



Written inr the Uohtbdebath Vktkhan. 

I.KE. 

I1Y 11. II. DYKEBS, WAYNES VI I.I.K, N. C. 

Be fought the fight tn tlnish, 
And his soldier work is done; 

Lee i v. r stands Immortal I 
Freedom's model of a son. 

As In the 'lav of liattlc, 
fir on his great retreat, 

The center of attraction; 
We come, our Lee to meet. 

We've tried to mould Ills features, 
To clothe him with a form; . 

To hold him np for men to see 
How much he can adorn. 

He came not home trlttmphant, 

Hut a hero lie did come; 
With honor pure, unsullied, 
And a love excelled by none. 

No pathway strewn with Rowers 
Welcomed I.ee back from the war, 

But an anguish for his country 
And the ruined homes he saw. 

He, who could stand undaunted 
'Midst tin- crash ami clang of arms, 

Grew grander when, disabled, 
Leading comrades to their farms. 

For he tread the path of duty, 
And he w*»n respect and fame,— 

The proudest wreath of laurels 
That a mortal man can claim. 

'Tis not the smoke of battle, 
The carnage, or the flame; 

But we hold our Lee close to us,— 
We love to call his name. 

And we tell all we know of him; 

And the nation yet uuborn 
Shall learn to know and love him 

Like the fathers that have gone. 



The Mary Washington Monument. — A "Woman's 
Movement" to erect a monument at the grave of Mary 
Washington is not succeeding as it deserves. Mary 
Ball Washington, the daughter of Col. Jfoseph Ball, of 
Lancaster, Va., was born in 1706; married Augustine 
Washington, March 6, 1730, and died August 25, 1789, 
aged eighty-three years. She was buried on the spot 
chosen by herself on her own home plantation," Ken- 
more," on the Rappahannock, near Fredericksburg. 
Forty years after, a patriotic citizen of New York, Mr. 
Silas E. Burrows, presented a handsome marble mon- 
ument for the spot, the corner-stone of which was laid 
by President Andrew Jackson in 1833, that was nearly 
but not entirely completed, and is now in such a state 
of dilapidation and ruin as to be irrecoverable. Au- 
gustine Washington, lather of George, died 1743, and 
his body was deposited in the family vault in West- 
moreland county, Virginia. 

Since the above was put in type, news comes from 
Fredericksburg: 

"The small Mary Washington Association here is 
much stirred up because they hear the National Asso- 
ciation has contracted for an $11,000 monument of 
Vermont granite, to be commenced early in the spring. 
They expected the women of the country to do better 
than that." 

The camp that will send 100 subscriptions can have 
appropriated one column in its interest this year. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



4i 



CARNAGE AT "THE CRATER," NEAR PETERSBURG. 



Lieut, Col. William II. Stewart, of the Sixty-first 
Virginia, Mahone's old brigade, gives a thrilling ac- 
count of the battle of "The Crater," from which the 
following extracts are made. He was asleep under liis 
little rly tent, when "a deep, rumbling sound, that 
seemed to rend the very earth in twain," startled him 
from his slumbers: 

"The whole camp had been aroused, and all were 
wondering from whence came this mysterious explo- 
sion. It was the morning of Saturday, the 30th Say 
of July, 1864. The long talked of mine had been 
sprung, a battery blown up, and the enemy were al- 
ready in possession of eight hundred yards of our en- 
trenchments. 

"Two hundred cannon roared in one accord, as if 
every lanyard had been pulled by the same hand. 
The gray fog was Moating over the fields, and darkness 
covered the face of the earth, bul the first bright streak 
of dawn was gently lifting the curtain of night. 

"The sun rose brilliantly, and the great artillery 
duel still raged in all its grandeur ami fury. 

"Soon after, Capt. Tom Bernard, Gen. Mahone's 
courier, came sweeping up the lines on his white 
charger to the headquarters of Brig. Gen. I>. A. Wei- 
siger. Then the drums commenced rolling off the sig- 
nals, which were followed by 'fall in' and hurried roll 
calls. We were required to drive back the Federals. 
who had gotten almost within the very L r :ites of the 
city of Petersburg. It was startling new-, bul our sol- 
diers faltered not, and moved off at quick step. 

"Wright's Georgia Brigade and our Virginia Brig- 
ade, the latter numbering scarcely eight hundred mus- 
kets, constituted the force detailed to dislodge the 
enemy, who held the broken lines with more than 
fifteen thousand men, and these were closely supported 
by as many more. 1 rememberthal our regiment, the 
Sixty-first, did not exceed two hundred men, includ- 
ing officers and privates, which I am quite sure was 
the strongest in the two brigades. 1 suppose we had 
marched the half of a mile when ordered to halt and 
strip off all baggage, except ammunition and muskets. 
We then tiled to the left a short distance to gain the 
banks of a small stream, in order to be protected from 
the shells of the Federal batteries by placing a range 
of hills between. The enemy were making disposi- 
tions to attempt their capture, for they were the very 
keys to the invested city. When nearly opposite the 
portion of our works held by the Federal troops, we 
met several soldiers who were in the works at the time 
of the explosion. Our men began ridiculing them for 
going to the rear, when one of them remarked: " Ay, 
boys, you have hot work ahead — they are negroes, and 
show no quarter." This was the first intimation that 
we had to fight negro troops, and it seemed to infuse 
the little band with impetuous daring, as they pressed 
onward to the fray. Our comrades had been slaugh- 
tered in a most inhuman and brutal manner, and 
slaves were trampling over their mangled and bleed- 
ing corpses. Revenge must have fired every heart and 
strung every arm with nerves of steel for the hercu- 
lean task of blood. We filed up a ditch, which had 
been dug for safe ingress and egress to a/id from the 
earthworks. 

"The 'Crater,' or excavation, caused by the explo- 
sion, was about twenty-five feet deep, one hundred and 



fifty feet long, and fifty feet wide. About seventy-five 

feet in rear of the supporting earthworks there was a 
wide ditch, with the bank throw n up on the side next to 
the fortifications. This was constructed to protect par- 
ties carrying ammunition and rations to the troops. 
Between this irregular and ungraded embankment and 
the main line the troops had constructed numerous 
caves, in which they slept at night to be protected 
from the mortar shells. The embankment from the 
bottom of the ditch was about ten feet high, and com- 
manded tic outer or main line. The space from the 
outside of the fortifications to the inner edge of the 

ditch was more than one hundred feet wide. 

"The 'Crater.' and the space on both sides for some 
distance, were literally crammed with the enemy's 
troops. They were five lines deep, and must have 
numbered between fifteen and twenty-five thousand 
men. Their historians admit that their charge was 
made by the whole of the Ninth Corps, commanded 
by Gen. A. E. Burnside, and that the Fifth and a part 
of the Second Corps were massed in supporting dis- 
tance 

"Mahone's old brigade, alter being deployed, < overed 
their front from the center of the ' ( rater' to the right. 
Our little band were desperate, and reckoned not the 
host^ that confronted them. I recollect counting seven 
standards in front of our regiment alone. ( >ur column 
was deployed in the valley before mentioned, in full 
view of these hostile thousands. As the soldiers filed 
into line, ( leu. Mahone walked from right to left, com- 
manding the men to reserve their tire until they 
reached the brink of the ditch, ami after delivering 
one volley to use the bayonet. < Mir line was hardly 
adjusted, and the Georgians had not commenced to 
deploy, when the division of negroes, the advance line 
of the enemy, made an attempt to rise from the ditch 
and charge. Just at that instant Gen. Mahone ordered 
a counter charge. The men ru-lied forward, officers 
in front, with uncovered heads and waving hats, and 
grandly and beautifully swept onward over the inter- 
vening space with muskets at trail. The enemy sent 
in the ranks a storm of bullets, and here and there a 
gallant fellow would fall: hut the files would close, 
still pressing onward, unwavering, into the jaw- of 
death! 

"The orders of Mai. Gen. Mahone were obeyed to 
the very letter, the brink of the ditch was gained be- 
fore a musket was discharged, the cry of No quarter!' 
greeted us, the one volley responded, and the bayonet 
plied with such irresistible vigor as insured success in 
the shortest space of time. Men fell dead in heap-, 
and human gore ran in streams that made the very 
earth mire beneath the tread of the victorious soldiers. 
The rear ditch being ours, the men mounted the rug- 
ged embankment and hurled their foes from the front 
line up to the .very mouth of the 'Crater.' In the 
meantime the Georgia Brigade had charged, but were 
repulsed; and soon after it was re-formed in column 
of regiments and again charged, but was met by such 

a withering fire that it again r< iled with a heavy 

slaughter. 

"Our bloody work was all done so quickly that I 
have scarcely an idea of the time it required to accom- 
plish it ; sonic say it was twenty minutes. It was over, 
1 am sure, about noon; and then, for the first time, 
we realized the oppression of the scorching rays of that 
•Inly sun, and many almost sank from exhaustion. 
The brigade captured fifteen battle-flags, and our own 



42 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



regiment owned five of the seven that I had counted 
in its front . 

"The wonderful triumph had been won at the price 
of tin- blood of the bravest, and best, and truest. Old 
Company ' F.' of Norfolk, had carried in twelve men, 
all of whom were killed or wounded. The Sixth R< sg- 
iment, t<> which it was attached, carried in ninety- 
eight men, and mustered ten for duty at this time. 
The Sharpshooters carried in eighty men, and sixteen 
remained for duty. Nearly half or our own regiment 
had fallen, ami the Twelfth, Forty-first, and Sixteenth 
Regiments had suffered in like proportion. Up to this 
time only an inconsiderable number of prisoners hail 
been captured. 

•■ During the charge, ( 'apt. John W. Wallace, of Com- 
pany '•'.' Sixty-first Virginia Regiment, was stricken 
down with a broken thigh. He lay upon his hack, 
refusing to allow his men to take him from the field 
till the battle was over, waving his hat and urging his 
men to 'Go on; go forward.' 

"When Maj. W. II. Etheredge, of the Forty-first 
Regiment, jumped in the ditch, a brave Federal in the 
front line fired through the traverse and killed a sol- 
dier at his side. lie immediately dropped his empty 
musket and snatched another from a cowering com- 
rade to kill Maj. Etheredge. At this juncture the 
Major, with remarkable self-possession, caught up two 
Federals, who were crouching in the ditch, and held 
their heads together between himself and his deter- 
mined opponent, swinging them to and fro to cover 
the sight ol the musket, the Federal doing his hest to 
uncover it SO as to unharm his friends by his bullet. 
Peter ( ; i lil is. of the Forty-first Virginia Regiment, 
rushed to the assistance of the Major, and killed his 
foe. Gibbs was a gallant soldier, and fought with 
great desperation. It was said at the time that he 
slew fourteen men that day. 

''The Alaliamians made a grand charge under a ter- 
rible fire, reaching the crest of the 'Crater' without 
faltering, and here a short struggle ensued. They 
tumbled muskets, clubs, clods of earth, and cannon 
halls into the excavation on the heads of the enemy 
with telling effect. This novel warfare lasted only a 
few minutes, when Bartlett ordered up the white Hag, 
an I about five hundred prisoners marched to our rear. 
The negroes among them were very much alarmed, 
and vociferously implored for their lives. One old 

cornfield chap exclan 1: 'My God, massa, 1 never 

pin ted a gun at a white man in all my life: dem nasty, 
stinking Yankees fotch us here, and we didn't want to 
come fus! ' 

"The appearance of this" rough, irregular hole beg- 
gars description. It was estimated that it contained 
six hundred bodies. The importance of reconstruct- 
ing this broken line of earthworks at mice prevented 
the removal of these bodies; therefore, they were buried 
as they had fallen, in one indiscriminate neap. Spades 
were brought in, and the earth thrown from the sides 
of the 'Crater' until they were covered a sufficient 
depth. By three o'clock in the afternoon all was over, 
and we were enjoying a welcome truce." 

Here follows an account of the odor on that hot af- 
ternoon, that is omitted from this account. 

" There weic thousands of captured arms around us, 
and during the night some of our men would shoot 
ramrods at the enemy just for the fun of hearing them 
wdiiz. One that was sent over drew from a Federal 
the exclamation : ' Great God ! Johnnie, you are throw- 



ing turkey spits ami stringing us together over here. 
Stop it'.' 

" A correspondent of one of the New York dailies. 
writing a description of this battle from accounts ob- 
tained from wounded officers who had arrived at Wash- 
ington, uses the following language: 'Often have the 
Confederates won encomiums for valor, but never he- 
fore did they tight with such uncontrollable despera- 
tion. It appeared as if our troops were at their mercy, 
standing helpless or running in terror, and shot dow n 
like dogs. No such scene has been witnessed in any 
battle ot the war. The charge of the enemy against 
the negro troops was terrific. With fearful yells they 
rushed down against them. The negroes at once ran 
hack, breaking through the line of white troops in the 
rear. Again and again their officers tried to rally them. 
Words and blows were useless. Tiny were victims of 
an uncontrollable terror, and human agency could not 

stop them.' 

"Next morning was a bright and beautiful Sabbath, 
and nothing of moment occurred. At least throe thou- 
sand of the Federal dead were still on the field, putri- 
fying under the scorching rays of the sun. I remem- 
ber a negro between the lines, who had both legs blown 
off, crawled to the outside of our works, stuck three 
muskets in the ground, and threw a small piece of tent 
cloth over them to shelter his head from the hot sun- 
shine. Some of our men managed to shove a cup of 
water to him, which he drank, and immediately com- 
menced frothing at the mouth, and died in a very 
short time afterwards. He had lived in this condition 
for nearly twenty-four hours. 

"On Monday morning a truce was granted, and the 
Federals sent out details to hury their dead between 
the lines. They dug a long ditch, and placed the bod- 
ies Crosswise, several layers up, and refilled the ditch, 
and thus ended the tragic scenes of three days in and 
around the 'Crater.' " 



The Statue of William Penn — The greatest work 
of art at the Columbian Exposition, no doubt, will be 
the bronze statue of William Penn, made to surmount 
the great dome at City Hall, Philadelphia. Its im- 
mense proportions are as follows: Weight, (it), ood lbs.; 
height, 37 ft.; hat, 3 ft. diam., rim, '_':'> ft. in circum- 
ference; nose. Pi inches long; eyes. VI ■in. long, 4 in. 
wide; mouth, from corner to corner, 14 in.; face, from 
hat to chin. 3 ft. 3 in.; hair, 4 feet long; shoulders, 28 
ft. circumference, 11 ft. diam.; arms, 12 ft. 6 in. long; 
coat sleeve, 9 ft. 6 in. circumference; cuffs on coat, 3 
ft. long; waist, '24 ft. circumference, 8 ft. 9 in. diam.; 
buttons on coat, 6in. in diam.; hands,*! ft.il in. cir- 
cumference, 3 ft. wide and 4 ft. long; fingers, 2 ft. Gin. 
long; finger nails, Min. long; legs, from ankle to knee, 
10 ft.; ankle, fi ft. circumference; calf of legs, 8 ft. 8in. 
in circumference; feet, 2'2 in. wide, 5 ft. 4 in. long; 
tree, Hi ft. 4 in. in circumference. 

The foregoing account may not be as impressive to 
tlie reader as it was to the editor of the Confederate 
Veteran, who stood at the foot of the enormous statue 
a few weeks ago in Philadelphia. 



In sending his subscription to the Confederate 
Veteran, Cel. W. P. Barlow, Secretary of the Ex-Con- 
federate Association of Missouri, says: "My impres- 
sion is that you have struck the right gait for a long 
march." 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 43 

SECRET SERVICE FUND. CONFISCATING PRIVATE PROPERTY. 



CONFEDERATE GOLD PAII> To UNCLE SAM BELONGING 
TO THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT. 



.1 REMINISCENCE CONNECTING GEN. FISK AND PRESI- 
DENT ANDREW JOHNSON. 



The editor of the Confederate Veteran had occa- 
sion to call on Capt. Ernest Cucullu, of New Orleans, 
and the conversation disclosed the fad that the last 
official Confederate order was issued to him. He had 
been on the staff of Gen. E. Kirby Smith from the 
time that officer was able to resume command after liis 
terrible wounds at Mannassas. 

Mr. Davis had communicated to Gen. Kirby Smith 
the fall of Richmond and the surrender of General 
Lee, and that hi' would endeavor to get to Cuba, and 
thence cross over to Texas, when', with 37,000 men 
west of the great river, they would make a stand at 
Hempstead, Tex. It was understood that in this last 
rally the best terms possible for capitulation would he 
made. 

Captain Cucullu was directed to take $10,000 in gold 
and go to Cuba, SO as to aid Mr. Pavis in his plans. 
The Captain suggested that >c>,iHnim gold would he 
Sufficient, and he only took that amount. 

Gen, Kirby Smith's headquarters were at Shreve- 
port. hut lie had gone to Galveston with his aide, and 
the money sachel had been taken on board tie Gray- 
hound, which was ready to run the blockade. While 
they waited, a flag-of-truce boat hove in sight. It 
brought the news that General Buckner had surren- 
dered at Shreveport. Then there was nothing to do 
by the man whom Mr. Pavis entrusted with "greater 
power than" he "due give in writing" hut to surren- 
der, and turn over the Confederate gold in his posses- 
sion, A plea was made in behalf <>( several general 
officers, and it was agreed that they he paid in the ag- 
gregate $1,700. The general commanding had due him 
thousands of dollars salary, hut declined to take any 
part of it. Here is the order, which i- certainly the 
last one ever issued : 

Galveston Harbor, June 3, 1865, Captain: When 

you reach New Orleans you will, after deducting your 
necessary traveling expenses, turn over to Major-Gen- 
cral Canby, United States Army, commanding, etc.. 

S".. 300, being the secret seiviee funds Confederate 

States, remaining in your possession. Respectfully, 
your obedient servant. E. Kirby Smith. General. 
( 'apt. Ernest Cuculu. 

After taking the money to General Canby, and get- 
ting his receipt, Dr. David Yandell. of Louisville." and 
another officer were found to be destitute, and General 
Canby gave them $270, and allowed $1, which was 
charged by Captain Cucullu for a carriage in New < >r- 
leans. General Canby's receipt is as follows: 

Headquarters Department of the Gttlf — New 
Orleans, June 6. 1865 -Received of Capt. Ernest Cu- 
cullu, aide-de-camp on the stall' of General E. Kirby 
Smith, the sum of $3,029 in specie, being the balance 
in his hands of the " secret servicefund" of the Trans- 
Mississippi Department. Ed R. S. Canby. 

General Canby seemed surprised that such a fund 
was turned over to him, but said: "It is just like 
Kirby, the soul of honor." They were fellow-students 
at West Point. 



J. B. White, in a letter from Tyree Springs, Tenn., 

gives some interesting reminiscences of wartimes at 
Nashville. He describes vividly the confiscation of 
Gen. Donelson's property, near Hendersonville, not 
many miles from Nashville, and how his application 
to restore it to the family after Donelson's death was 
treated. His petition for its restoration was emphati- 
cally refused, with the comment, "No. sir; we will 
never give up that property whilst the Government 
lasts." l L>- refused to put in writing his decision, un- 
til Judge Lawrence, a Tennessean, but who had en- 
listed in the Union cause, suggested that he write on 
the application, " Refused," which he did. - 
( Continuing his letter, Mr. White says: 

"The General occupied the home 'if John M. Bass, 
on Church Street, now owned by E. W. Cole. His 
headquarters were luxuriously furnished, and he was 
attended by a troop of handsome, well-dressed ser- 
vants, both men and women. He sustained the great- 
ness and dignity of the Government in grand style. 

"After leaving the headquarters of the General, 1 
went to see Mrs. Donelson, and told her the result of 
my petition and the failure of my application. I 
handed her the petition with the General's indorse- 
ment, ami adv ised her to write to President Johnson, 
enclose tin papers t<> him, and ask him to order Gen 
:o give her tic possession of her home. I told 
her to explain to the President fully her condition and 
that of lei family, and to remind him of the former 
relations that existed between himself and her hus- 
band,and to lei me see her letter before she mailed it. 

I called to see her next day. She had her letter ready 
and read it to me. It was a -mart, admirable letter. 

well written, reminding the President that they were 
both natives of North Carolina, and were residents of 
the same city — Raleigh; that her father was Gov. 
Branch, of North Carolina, and was Secretary of the 
Navy under Gen. Jackson, and that he had lived in 
Washington City with her father's family, where she 
was married to Gen. Donelson, and had removed with 

her husband soon thereafter to Tennessee; and that 
Gen. Donelson had always been his personal and po- 
litical friend, and had supported him for Governor of 
Tennessee against ( !ol. < ientry, his own hrother-in-law. 
a man for whom he had the highest respect, yet his 
political and personal friendship was stronger than 
family ties; ami now, her husband being dead and his 
family without a home and dependent upon others 
for a shelter, -he applied confidently to him to see that 
-he was restored to her home, as she was advised that 
she had a right to it. She believed he would never 
forsake a friend in adversity. She had entertained 
him at her house, and her husband had been his friend 
when he needed friends. 

"This letter presented her case much better than I 
had presented it in my petition to Gen. Kisk. A 
woman can write much hotter than a man when her 
feelings are enlisted. 1 told Mrs. Donelson her letter 
was well conceived and better executed. It was mailed 
to the President, and when he received it Judge East 



44 



C< )XFEDERATE VETERAN. 



h ippened to be at the White House on buBiness with 
the Presidi nt. East said when the President got Mrs. 
Denelson's letter ami read it. he got into a towering 
passion, and Bwore thai her father, Gov. Branch, was 
the first public man that ever noticed him or spoke a 
kind word to bim : that one morning when he was oul 
very early sweeping the pavement in front of the simp 
in which he was learning the tailor's trade, a tall, gray- 
haired man came walking by and spoke kindly to bim, 
commending his industry, and Baid: 'That is right, 
my son: always be honest and industrious and you 
Will make a man of yourself.' He told me lie was 
Gov. Branch, ami gave me a silver half-dollar to keep 
in remembrance 01 him ami the advice he had given 
me. He said lie had the half-dollar now with him at 

the White Ilmise. and 1 rdered his private secretary. 

Browning, to go ami get it: he wanted tn show it to 
.1 udge Bast. 

"The President then ordered his secretary to send a 
telegram to Gen. Fisk to give up the farm to Mrs. Don- 
elson, which was done that night. (Jen. Fisk paid no 
attention to t lie dispatch, believing, as he told me, 
that it was bogus. Mrs. Donelson waited .some weeks 
and received no reply to her letter. 1 told her to write 
again, as the letter might have miscarried; she wrote 
again. This was answered, and a peremptory order 
on (Jen. Fisk to give up the place to Mrs. Donelson, 
and report to the President immediately why he had 
not complied with his first order; and if his reasons 
were not entirely satisfactory, some one would he put 
in his place who would obey his orders. 

" Fisk came mar losing nis position, and he made 
up for the delay of action by immediate restoration of 
everything possible to the 1 lonelson family." 

The foregoing story is not meant to convey implied 
comment on the action of the President. It is given 
-imply as a reminiscence of war times. Judge Law- 
rence, wdio is referred to, was connected with the Union 
forces through much of the war. and made friendships 
for heroic service- in behalf of citi/ens who were mal- 
treated by the army. The family of the late Col. G. 
A. Washington will ever have pathetic memory for 
hi- kindness to them, when two sets of soldiers went 
to Wessyngton and got into a quarrel over which 
should take his life because he had killed a soldier 
who was stealing one of his horses. 



GEN. GRANT AT SHIFOH. 



.1 NASHVILLE LADY QIVR8 VALUABLE HISTORIC TES- 
TIMONY. 



KNOWLEDGE OF GEN. WHITESIDE WASTED. 



Aberdeen, South Dakotah, 
November 20, 1892. 
Dear SlR — Can you furnish me the present address 
of a Gen. Whiteside who, in l.s<;2 and lsc;*,, com- 
manded a brigade of Confederate Cavalry, and in a 
light engagement | 1 think i at Lamar, Miss., was 
wounded and taken prisoner. A friend of mine has 
a pair of silver spurs which he at that time took from 
the General, and would now like to return them to 
him or his family. The lapse of time has, in my opin- 
ion, made them very valuable to their former owner 
as a relic, and my friend would take great pleasure in 
returning them. Respectfully yours, 

i). McGlachlin. 



Sin- writes to T. M. Hurst, Assistant Postmaster at 

Nashville, in reply to a letter of inquiry. The home 
of the lady was. at that time, on the Tennessee River 
bluff at Savannah, a few miles below where the battle 
of Shiloh was fought : 

" N \-u \ 111 k. Tknn., December li, 1892. 
" Dear Sir— Your letter of inquiry concerning '(Jen. 
Grant's physical condition on the morning the battle 
of Shiloh began.' is received. You will please accepl 
my assurance, gladly given, that on the date men- 
tioned 1 believe (Jen. Grant was thoroughly sober. 
He was at my breakfast-table when he heard the re- 
port from a cannon. Holding, untasted, a cup of cof- 
fee, he paused in conversation to listen a moment at 
the report of another cannon. He hastily arose, say- 
ing to his stall' officers, 'Gentlemen, the ball is in mo- 
tion; let's be off.' His flagship (as he called his spe- 
cial steamboat^ was lying at the wharf, and in fifteen 
■minutes he. stall' officers, orderlies, clerks, and horses 
had embarked. 

" During the weeks of his occupancy of my house he 
always demeaned himself as a gentleman; was kind, 
courteous, genial, and considerate, and never appeared 
in my presence in a state of intoxication. He was 
uniformly kind to citizens, irrespective of polities, and 
whenever the brutality to citizens, so frequently in- 
dulged in by the soldiers, was made known to him, he 
at once sent orders for the release of the captives or 
restoration of the property appropriated. As a proof 
of his thoughtful kindness, 1 mention that during the 
battle on Sunday he wrote and sent to my mother a 
safeguard to prevent her home being used for a hos- 
pital. Yielding to the appeals of humanity, she did. 
however, open her home to the wounded and sick for 
three months in succession, often administering to 
their wants and necessities in person. In such high 
esteem did fJeu. Grant hold such magnanimity under 
the most aggravating circumstances, that he thanked 
her most cordially, assuring her that, considering the 
great losses and gross indignities she had received from 
the soldiers, her nobility of soul was more to be ad- 
mired than the fame of a general leading an army of 
victorious soldiers. 

"On one occasion he asked to be introduced to my 
mother and family, saying. 'If you have no objections 
to introducing me, I will be much pleased.' I replied, 
' Not because you are a great general, but because I be- 
lieve you to be a gentleman, I will unhesitatingly in- 
troduce you to them.' In deference to the fact that I 
was a southern lady, with southern proclivities, he 
attired himself in a full suit of citizen's clothes, and, 
touching himself on the shoulder, said, 'I thought 
you would like this best,' evincing delicate courtesy 
and gentlemanly instincts of which the honors of war 
or merited promotion had not deprived him. 

"I feel that it is due to the surviving members of 
(Jen. Grant's family to mention some evidences of his 
great-hearted ness as shown in kindness to southern 
people. 'Military necessity ' was not to him a term 
synonymous with unlicensed vandalism or approval 
of terrorism. He was too great and too true to his 
manhood to be fettered by prejudice. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



45 



"lam pleased that t can give these reminiscences 
of a man who, as a soldier and statesman, received 
and merited the homage of a nation; for they are tes- 
timonies of his inner life and innate characteristics 
worthy to be recorded with the magnanimity of 'kin- 
ship over self,' as manifested on the day of Gen. Lee's 
surrender. " Respectfully, 

"Mrs. YV. H. Cherry." 



A CON FEDERATE AT THE TOMB OF GRANT. 



The principal oration at the tomb of Grant lasl 
memorial day was delivered by Col. Charles Marshall, 
who was chief of staff to General Lee. He said, in 
part : 

"It is not easy to express the thoughts that the scene 
before me inspires in my mind, and in the mind of 
every man who understands the full meaning of this 
occasion. Men who were arrayed against each othei 

in deadly strife are now met together to ■!" I ir to 

the memory of one who led one part of this audience 
to ;i complete and absolute victory over the other, yet 
in the hearts of the victors there is no feeling of 
triumph, and in the hearts of the vanquished there is 
no bitterness, no humiliation." 

Col. Marshall said that both the North and the 
South rejoice that the voyage across a tempestuous sea 
of blood and teats is over. After referring to the bit- 
terness of the conflict, and the fad that the combat- 
ants so quickly dispersed at the end, be said : 

"No such peace as our peace ever followed imme- 
diately upon such a war as our war. The exhausted 
South was completely at the mercy of the victorious 
North, and yet the sound of the last gun bad scarcely 
died away when, not only peace, but peace and good 
will, were re-established, ami the \ ictors and the van- 
quished took u]i the work of repairing the damages of 
war, and advancing the common welfare of the whole 
country, as if the old relations — social, commercial and 

political between the people of the two section-, bad 

never been disturbed." 

Of Grant be said : 

"Great as were bis achievements in war, I think his 
crowning glory was that of a peacemaker, and that to 
him belongs the blessing promised to peacemakers." 



SOUTHERN (iRAXITE FOR THE MONUMENT. 



New Orleans Times-Democrat.] 

A correspondent suggests that as the Davis monu- 
ment is to be a Southern affair it be constructed oi 
stones from the various Southern States, the design 
contributed by Southern artists and the work done by 
Southern men. 

This proposition seems reasonable enough to us 
under the Circumstances, and not smacking of section- 
al sentiment. 

When Mr. Davis died but few sympathizing mes- 
sages came from the other side of the Ohio; there 
marched in his funeral procession none from the 
Northern States - they left us to bury our dead. It 
was an affair in which the South alone took part, al- 
though to Mr. Davis the far Western States owed 
their birth and prosperity, and once were proud to 
honor him. Had the Southern cause succeeded, we 
might have called on the marble of Greece to com- 



memorate it, but the Lost Cause will be best re- 
membered in the stone of the Southern land, where 
defeat awaited us. 

Even if the South were barren of tine stones and 
its monument bleak and desolate in consequence, it 
would be a true memento of the South, which went 
into this titanic struggle unprepared and without any 
of tin' resources necessary for warfare. Fortunately. 
however, it will not be necessary to build a monument 
of boulders. Since the death of the Confederacy, the 
Southern States have been discovered to be rich in the 
finest building and monumental stones. The marble 
of Tennessee now finds its way over the entire Union, 
and is good enough for the National Capitol itself, the 
granite of Georgia is paving the streets of Cincinnati 
and many other Western cities: syenite of Missouri is 
among the handsomest building stones in thiscountry. 
From tne quarries of the Southern States we get hand- 
some stones, so that the Davis monument will not 
only be Southern throughout, but as grand and 
beautiful as it should be, an evidence not only of 
Southern patriotism and devotion, but of the South's 
wealth <<( resources. The quarries of neither Maine 
nor Greece 'an contribute anything more beautiful 
than the Southern States can themselves give to the 
memory of their dead leader ami tin 1 Lost Cause. 

Every State in the Union has contributed stone to 
the Washington monument; every State in the South 
should give to the Davis monument, which will com- 
memorate the four years' life of a nation which has 
passed away the Confederate States of America. 



UNITED i <>.\ FEDERATE VETERA*'* COMMITTEES. 



\- a "Historical Committee, and on Southern 
School History" to formulate a plan to secure a true 
and reliable history of the late civil war. and to select 
a proper and truthful history of the United States to 
recommend for use in the public and private schools 
of the South: Lieut. -Cen. E. Kirby Smith, Chairman, 
Sewaiiee. Tel in.: I'rof .1. N. Stubbs. Woods' ( 'rose Roads, 
Gloucester county, Va.; Prof. Alonzo Hill. Tuscaloosa, 
Ala.; Lieut. Gen. S. D. Lee. Starkville, Mi-- Maj.- 
Gen. Ellison Capers, Columbia, S. C; Col. H. L. Hent- 
ley, Abilene, Tex.; Prof .1. W. Nicholson, Baton 
Rouge. La. 

As a committee whose duty it shall be to memorial- 
ize the Governors and Legislatures of the several States 
and Territories which comprised the late Confederate 
States (which have not already done so i. requesting 
that adequate provision be made for maimed and 
helpless Confederate veterans and their widows, to- 
wit: General Wade Hampton, chairman. Colum- 
bia, S. ('.; Hon. John W. Daniel. Richmond, Va.; Ex- 
Gov. Robert Lowry, Jackson, Miss.; Ex-Gov. L. S. 
Ross, College Station, Tex.; Ex-Gov. James L.Eagle, 
Little Rock, Ark. . 

To serve on the committee to memorialize the Gov- 
ernors and Legislatures of the States and Territories 
which comprised the late Confederate States, to pen- 
sion Mrs. Y. Jefferson Davis. Gen. Alexander W. 
Archer, Richmond, Va. 



Dr. H. M. Manson, a well-known Confederate, of 
Rockwall, Texas: "I sent you $10 this morning tor 
the Davis Monument. The incoming mail brought 
the Confederate Veteran, and I send you six sub- 
scribers; will send more." 



46 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



UNITED CONFEDERATE VETERAN CAMPS. 



AI.AHA.MA. 
TOSTO! PICK. ' \M P. HO. 01 J l< i KS. 

Bessemer Bessemer i 57 w. R. Jones, N. H.Sewall. 

Btrmlogbam-... W.J. Hardee 89 Gen. P. B Ferguson, R. E. 

Jones. 

Kutaw Banders 64 Capt. O. H. Cole, F. II. Mun.ly. 

Mohii.- Raphael Semmes. m Capt, Thos. T. Roche, Wm. 

E. Mlckle. 
Montgomery. ..Lomax 



,151...Capt. Emmet Selbels, J. II. 
Higglns. 



ai;k i.N8AS. 

Alma Cabell 202 

Beotonvllle I abell v » Capt. N.s. Henry, A. .!. Bates. 

I • itn Point .. Haller 182 

Charleston Pal Cleburne... 191... 

Conway Jefl Davis 213 

Payettevllle W. H. Brooks 218... 

Port Smith n.uT. Duval l Hi Capt.P.T. Devauey, R. M.Fry. 

Qreenwood Ben McCulloch . ...194... 

Hack. -it City... Stonewall 199... 

Hope Gratiot 208... 

Morrllton Robert W. Harper .2(7... 

Nashville roe NeaJ 202... 

VanBuren John Wallace 209 

FLORIDA. 

Brookvllle W. W. Loring 18 Gen. John C. Devant, Col. 

Kred I.. Robertson. 

Chipley Chlpley 'JIT... 

Dad.- City Pasco C. V. Ass'n..., 57 ('apt. John B. Johnston, \. 

H. Ravesles. 

Fernandino Nassau 104. ..Thos. A. Hall. 

Inverness Geo. T. War.l 118. ..rapt. \V. C. Zimmerman, W. 

s. Turner. 

Jacksonville. ..R. E. Lee 58 .Gen. Wm.Baya, W.W.Tucker. 

Jasper Stewart 155 Capt. H. .1. Stewart, John E. 

Banna. 

Lake City Columbia Co 150...Capt.W. R. Moore, \V. M. Ives. 

Marlaona Milton 132. ..Capt W. D. Barnes, F. Philip. 

Montlcello Patton Anderson.... 59... Capt. W. C. Bird, B. W. Part- 
ridge. 

Ocala Marion Co.CV. A... 56...' apt. J. J. Flnley, Wm. Fox. 

Orlando Orange Co 54...Capt. W. 11. Jewell, li. M. 

Robinson. 

Palmetto Geo. T.Ward 63... Japt. J. C. Pelot,J.W. Nettles. 

Pensacola Ward C. V. Ass'n 10.. Cant. It. J. Jordan, C. V. 

'ill'. tllps, ,ii. 

Qulncy D.L.Kenan 140. ..(apt. It. H. M. Davidson, D. 

M. McMillan. 

St. Augustine. ..E. Klrby smith 175...I lapt. J. A. Enslow, l r. 

Sanford Gen. J. Finnegan 149. ..Capt. A. M. Thrasher, ( '. II. 

I.eiler. 

Tallahassee Lamar 1(51 ...R. A. Whitfield. 

Tampa Hillsboro 3H...l"t. F. W. Merrln, H. L. Crane. 

Titusvillc Indian River 47...CI. J. Pritcbett, A. D. Cohen. 

GEORGIA, 

Atlanta Fulton Co., Ga IS9...Gen. W. L. Calhoun, John F. 

Edwards. 
Dalton Jos.E. Johnston 34. ..Capt. A. F. Roberts, J. A. 

Blanton, 

Ringgold Ringgold 206... 

Bprlng Place... John B. Gordon 50.. Capt. R. K.Wilson, W. H. 

Ramsey. 
ILLINOIS. 
Chicago Ex-Con. Ass'n B...C't. J. W. While, it. I,. France. 

INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Ardmore John H. Morgan 107. ..('apt. J. L. Gaut, K. Scales. 

Mc Vlester Jeff Lee 08. Gen. N. P.Guy, R. B. Coleman. 

KENTUCKY. 
Bowling Green-Bowling Green 148. .. Capt. W. F. Perry, James A. 

Mitchell. 

(ynthiana Ben Desha 9S...Capt.D. M.Snyder, J.W.Boyd. 

Danville. I. Warren Grlgshy... 211. ..('apt. K. M. Green, John II. 

Baughman. 

Georgetown Georgetown 98. ..Capt. A. H. Sinclair, J. Webb. 

Harrodsburg William Preston.., . 96...Capt. B. W. Allln, John Kane. 

Luwrenceburg...Bcn Hardin Helm. ..101. ..('apt. P. H. Thomas, John P. 

Vaughn. 

Lexington L C. Breckinridge ...100...Gen. J. Ho. v. I, G. C.Snyder. 

Ml. Sterling ,Roy S. I 'hike -2.il. .. Col. Thomas Johns W. T. 

Havens. 

Paducab \. P. Thompson 171 ..( "t.w.G. Bullitt, J. M. Brown. 

Paris lolni H. Morgan 05. ..Capt. A. T. Forsyth, Will A. 

Gaines. 



KENTUCKY— Continued. 

I'ostoi i n B. CAMP. NO. orFICBBS. 

Richmond Thomas B. Collins. ..215...Capt- .las. Tevls, N. H. Death- 

erage. 

Russellvllle. lobn W. Caldwell...l89...MaJ. J. II. Brlgt;s, w. H. Mc- 
carty. 

Versailles Uex Buford no. ..Capt. Jos. c. Bailey, Russell 

V. Bishop. 

LOUISIANA. 

Alexandria Jeff Da\ is 6. ..Gen. Geo. O. Walls. Capt. W. 

W. Whlttlngton. 

Ainii.ctty Amite City 78. ..('apt. A. P. Richards, G. W. 

Bankaton. 

Baton Rouge Baton Rouge. 17. ..Gen. John McGrath, I', w. 

Heroman. 

Berwick. Winchester Hall 178... Capt. M. W. Bateman, F. 0. 

Brlen. 

Donaldsons llle. Ma). V. Mau-ln 38.. .Capt. S, A. Poche, P. Ganel. 

Evergreen K. L. Gibson Si. ..Col. Wm. M. Ewell, I. ('.John- 
son. 

Lake Charles Calcasieu C. Vet 82. ..Capt. W. A. Kl.app. W. I,. 

HutchingB. 

I,. Providence Lake Providence 198... 

Mansfield Mouton 41. ..Capt. C. Schuler, T.G. l'egues. 

Merrick Isaiah Norwood 110... Capt.. D. T. Merrick, J. Jewell 

Taylor. 
Natchitoches.. ..Natchitoches 40 ..('apt. J. Alp. Prudbomme, c. 

K. Levy. 
NewOrleans \rmv of N. Vn l...Col. W. R. Lyman, Thos. & 

O'Brien. 

New ( n leans Army of Tenu 2...Gen. J. Glynn Jr., N. Cnny. 

NewOrleans Wash. Artillery 15. ..Col. B. F. Kshelman, I.ieut.- 

Col. L. A. Adam. 
New Orleans Henry st. Paul l6...Gen. Jos. Demoruelle, Col. M. 

T. Dncros. 



1 ipelousas... 



,.R. B. Lee.... 



iloomticl.l. 



Plaquemlne Iberville 18. ..('apt. Chas. II. Dickinson, 

John L. Dardenne. 

Rayvllle Richland 152.. .Capt. J. dm s. Summerlln, O. 

T. Smith. 

Rusiin Rustin 7...Capt.A.Barksdale, .1. 1.. Hon. 1. 

Shreveport' Gen. Leroy Stafford 3. ..Capt. Wm. Kinney, Will H. 

Tunnard. 

Tangipahoa Camp Moore 60.. .Capt. 0. P. Amacker, (i. II. 

Taylor. 

Thil.odaux Braxton Bragg 196... 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Boonevllle W. H. II. Tlson 170. ..('apt. D. T. Beall, J.W.Smith. 

Columbus Isham Harrison 27 ...Dr. B. A. Vaughan, W. A, 

1 ampliell. 
CrvsialSp'gs Hen Humphreys 19. ..Capt. ('. Humphries, J. M. 

Haley. 

Edwards W. A. Montgomery 26. ..Capt. W. A. Montgomery, H. 

W. Barrett. 

Fayette J.J.Whitney 22. ..Capt. W. I,. Stephen, W. K. 

Penny. 

Greenw I Hugh A. Reynolds...218... 

Grenada W. K. Harksdale 189... 

Hattiesburg Hattlesburg 21. ..Cant. Geo. D. Hartilcld, Evan 

H. Harris. 

Holly Springs... Kit Mott 23...Capt. J. F. Kant. S. H. 1'ryor. 

Jackson Kol.l. A. Smith 24. ..('apt. W.D.Holder. (J. S. Green. 

Macon las. I gstreei iso... Capt. W. H.Foote, J. L.Griggs. 

Meridian Wall I. all 25. ..("t. W. K. Brown, 11. \'. White. 

Miss. City Beauvoir l20...Gen. J. R. Davis, F. S. Hewes. 

Natchez Natchez 20...Lieut.-Col. F.J. V. Let and, 

K. L. Hopkins. 

Doit ( .ii.son . ( llalborne 167...Capt.A.K.Jones, W.W. Moore. 

Rolling Fork .Pal Cleburne 190... 

Rosedale.. Montgomery 52. ..Col. F. A. Montgomery, (has. 

c. Farrar. 
Tupelo luliii M. Stone 131. ..Gen. John M. Stone, P. M. 

Savery. 

Vlcksburg Vlcksburg 32... Capt. D.A.Campbell, C. Davis. 

Woodvllle W Iville 49.. .Capt. J. H. Jones, P. M. 

Stockett. 
Yazoo City Yazoo camp 176.. .Capt. s. D. Robertson, W. R. 

McCuteheon. 

MISSOURI. 
Kansas City Kansas City 80. ..("t. J. W.Mercer, G. B.Spratt. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Clinton Sampson 137. ..It. II. Holliday, C. K. Helling. 

( 'on cord ('alia rr us Co. ( '. Y. A. .21 2... 

Newton Catawba 182...C't. J. G. Hall, L. R.Whitener. 

OKLAHOMA. 

Norman Gen. J. B. Gordon. ..200... 

Oklahoma ("I. D. II. llaminon .I77...('apt. J. W. Johnston, John 

(i. easier. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



47 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 

POSTOFFK'E. CAMP. NO. OFFICERS. 

Aiken Barnard E. Bee SI. ..Capt. B. H. Teague. .1 \ T 

Wigfall. 
St. Georges Stephen Elliott 51.. .J. Otey Reed. 

TENNESSEE. 

Chattanooga N. B. Forrest 4. ..Gen. .1. V. Shipp, I,. T. Dick- 

inson. 
Clarksvillc Forbes 



77 ( apt. T. H. Smilli. Clay 
stacker. 



Fayetteville s'kel ford-Fulton... 114. ..Col. .Tames D. Tillman, W. H. 

I a-hnm. 

Franklin John L. McEwen.. -...Cant. B. F. Roberts, K. N. 

Richardson. 
Jackson John Ingram 37. ..('apt. I-:. s. Mallory, s. E. Kit- 

r..lf. 
Knoxvllle Felix K. Zollleoffer...46 Cant. John F. Horn, (has. 

Ducloux. 
Knoxville Fred Anil 5. ..Col. Frank A. Moses, MaJ. J. 

W. s. Prlerson. 
Lewlsburg Dibrell 55...Capt. w. P. Irvine, \v. ti. 

Lloyd. 
McKenzIe. ........ Stonewall Jackson., 12...Capt. Marsh Atklsson, Dr. J. 

1'. i lannon. 

Memphis Con. His. Ass'n 28 Col. C. W. Fraser, R.J. Black. 

Murf reesboro.... Joe B. Palmer 81...Capt. \v. s. McLemore. Wm. 

Ledbei tei 
Nashville Frank Cheatham.... 86... Elder K. I. in Cave, Col. John 

P. Hickman. 
Bhelbyvllle Wm, Frlerson 88 Capt. John M. Hastings. Jno. 

• .. Arnold. 
Tullahoma.. Pierce B. Anderson 17:; (apt. J, p. Bennett, W.J. 

Travis. 

Winchester, Turnej 12. ..Cant. W, H. Brannau, .1. .1. 

Martin. 

TEXAS. 

Abilene Vbllene 72 . T. W. Dougherty. 

Abilene Taylor Co ..... <•:' Col, II. I.. Bentley, Theo. 



Alvarado.. 



Hej ik. 

Alvarado .. UV .1. H. Posey. 



Athens Howdy Martin 65. ..('apt., D M. Morgan, W. T. 

Eustace. 

Atlanta Stonewall Jackson- 91. ..Cant. J. 1'. Johnson, .lames 

N . sim nions. 

Austin John I! Ilood 103 Cant. Wm. M. Brown, (has. 

11. Powell. 

Beaumont A. S. Johnston 75. ..Capt. Jed Chalsson, Tom J- 

Russell, 

Bellow Bell Co. ex-Con As 122. ..Capt. H. M. Cook, R. H. Tur- 
ner. 

BOnham Sul Boss Kit I 'apt. J. P. Holmes. 

Brownwood Stonewall Jackson. .118. ..Capt. Carl Vincent. R. I,. 

Archer. 

Bryan J. B. Robertson 124. .. Capt. H. II. Stoddard, \V. II. 

Harmon. 
Buffalo Gap (amp Moody — ...('apt. Ben !•'. Jones, J. J. 

Kuban k. 
Calvert W. P. Townsend HI. ..('apt. .1. H. Drennon, C. W. 

Higglnbotbain. 
Camerson Ben McCullough...., 29.. . Capt. E. J. Mclver, Joseph li. 

Moon-. 

Canton. James L. Hogg lit (apt. T. J. Towles, W. I>. 

Thompson. 
Carthage Horace Randall .... I68...J. R, Bond, J M. Woolworth. 

Cleburne Pat Cleburne 88.. (apt. o. T. Plnmmer, M. s. 

Kalilc 
Colorado Albert Sidney — ...('apt. \V V. Johnson, Thos. 

Q. Mullln. 
Columbus Shropshire-Upton. ..112. ..Capt. Geo. Met lormlck, J. J. 

Pick. 
Coleman John Pi lham 76. ..Capt. J. J. Callan, Janus M. 

Williams. 
Corpus Chrlstl... Jos. E. Johnston.., S3.. .Capt. H. R. Sutherland, M. ('. 

Spann. 

Corslcana ('. M. Winkler 147. ..Capt. B. M. Collins. 

Crockett Crockett Ill (apt. Enoch Braxson, .1. F. 

Martin. 
Caldwell camp Rogers 142. ..I. F. Matthews, 

Dallas Sterling Price .11. ..('apt. .1. .1. Miller, Gen. Wm. 

L. Thompson. 

Dechtur Ben McCulloch 30...Capt. Will A, Miller, A. Ed- 

wards. 

Denton Sul Boss 120. ..Capt. Hugh McKenzie, J. R. 

Burton. 

Dublin Erath & Comanche.. 85 Gen. J. T. Harris, 1„ E. (■(!- 

lett. 

Emma Lone Star 198... 

Fairfield Wm. I,. Moody NT. ..('apt. Ueo.T. Bradley. I,. (.. 

Sandlfer. 
Famey Camp Bee l80...Capt T. M. Daniel, S. U. 

Fleming. 



TEXAS— Continued. 

POStOFFICE. ('AMI'. MO. OFFICERS. 

Fort Worth R. K. Lee 158. J. W. Friend. Eugene Burr. 

Frost R. u. Mills lOti.Capt. A. Chamberlain, Dr. M. 

F. Wakefield, 

Gainesville los. E. Johnston 119.. Capt. J. M. Wright, John T. 

Walker. 

Galveston Magruder 105.. (Jen. T. N. Waul. Chris c 

Beavans. 

Gatesvllle Ex-c. A.Coryell Oo. I8S W. 1.. Saunders. 

Goldthwaitc Jefl Davis 117. Mai. J. E. Martin, F. M. Tay- 
lor. 

Gonzales Gonzales 166. Mai. W. iv Bayers, M. East- 

land. 

Graham ..Young County 127. ..(apt. A. T. Gay, Y. M. Ed- 

wards. 

Granbury Granbury 67...J. A. Formivalt. I. H. Morris. 

Hamilton A. S. Johnston UK. (apt. W. T. Saxon, c. C. 

PoW.ll. 

Hemstead Tom Green 186 ..Capt. Van B. Thornton, Sam 

Sell ware 

Henrietta .Sul Roes l72...Capt F. J. Barrett, C. B. Pat- 

terson. 

llillsboro Hill County l(»i Wm. A. Fields. 

Houston Dick Bowling 197 

Kaufman. ..Geo. D. Manlon ...145 (apt. los. II nil master, E. s. 

Pipes. 

Kingston \ 3. Johnston 71 ...Capt. J. F. Puckett, T. J. Fos- 

ter. 

l.adonia Rol.t.E.I.ee lit; Cant. G. W. Rlakene.\ . F. W. 

Blakeney. 
LaGrange ..Col. B. Tlmmons 61. ..Capt. B. H. Phelps, N. Ib>l- 

man. 

Lampasas B. E. Lee «i J. S. Lauderdale. D. C. 

Thomas. 

Lubbock F. K. Lubbock i > Capt W. D, Crump, (i. W. 

Shannon. 

Madisonvill, .lohh (i. Walker 128...R. Wiley. 

Meridian A. s. Johnston 115 ..('apt. Robert Donncll, I. W. 

Adams acting). 
Merkel Merkel 79 (apt. J. T. Tucker. A. A. 

Baker. 
Mevi.i Joe Johnston ... . »i Capt. C. L. Watson, 11. w. 

Williams. 

Mlnncola Wood County 153.. Capt. J. H. Huflmaster, Geo. 

A. (age. 
Mt. Enterprise Rosser. 82 ' apt. T. Turner. B. Birdwell. 

Mt.Pleasant Col. Dud Jones Ul i apt . c. L. Dillahnnty. .1. C. 

Turner. 

Montague ... Bob --lone 98 Capt. R. Bean, R. D. Rugeley. 

McKlnney Collin County 109 (Jen. W.M. Bush. II. (. Mack. 

Navavota Pat Cleburne 102 Capt .W. E. Barry. B. M. West . 

Oakvllle loh n Donaldson .... — ... 

Palestine Palestine 44. ..Capt. .1. W. Ewlng, J. M. Ful- 

1111 wider. 
Paris I.S.Johnston 70 Capt. Geo. H. Pro-vine, John 



apt. 

W. Webb 



Paint Rock. . ..Jeff Davis ..168 Capt. W. T. Melton. J. W. 

Ratcbford. 
Rockwall Rockwall 74 Capt. M.S. Austin, N. C Ed- 

wards. 

Rob} w. w. Loring 134 .Capt D. Speer, W. a, smith. 

San Antonio A.S.Johnston 141. Cant. John s. Ford. Taylor 



Mcltae. 
Seymour Bedford Forrest so (apt. T. H. c. Peery, R. J. 

Browning. 
Sherman . ..Mildred Lee 90. ..Capt. J. T. Wilson, R. Walker. 

Sweetwater E. C Walthall 92. (apt. W. D. II. all. J. H. Free- 
man. 

Sulphur sp'gs Matt Ashcrofl 170 (apt. R. M. Henderson, M. G. 

Miller. 

Taylor A. S. Johnston Hie. (apt. M. Boss, P. Hawkins. 

Tvler i.. 8. Johnston 18. ..Capt James P. Douglas. Bid 

s. Johnson. 

Vernon Camp Cabell 125...Capt Sheni E. Hatchett >*. 

D. Davis. 
Waxahachie leff Davis 108 Cant R. P. Mackey, W. M. 

McK night. 

Weatherford Tom Green 169. ..Capt. J. P. Rice, M. V. Kin- 

nison. 
Wichita Falls ...W.J. Hardee 73. ..Capt. C. R. Crockett. N. A. 

Robinson. 

VIRGINIA. 

Reams Station.. J. E. B. Stuart 211... 

Richmond George E. Picketts..204... 

Roanoke William Watts.. ,.205 

Williamsburg ..McGruder-Ewell 210... 

WASHINGTON, D. c. 

Washington Wash, cily Con 171. ...Maj. Albert Akers. 



4 8 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



i'hc (fonfcdcvutc llctcvan. 

Fifty CentB^T Year. S. A CUNNINGHAM. Editor. 

Offlce ;i t The American, Corner Church and Cherry Sta. 

This publication Is the ;•■ rsonal property of S. A. < unnlngham. 
Honey paid f"r n does not augment the Monument Fund directly, 
but as au auxiliary Its benefll certainly makes it eminently worth] 
the patronage of every frlmd of the c 

The death of ex-President Rutherford B. Haves. 
which occurred since our last issue, removes from the 
walks of life the last ex-President except Mr. Cleve- 
land. Mr. Hayes was in many respects a good man, 
and 'hiring his administration it was generally ac- 
cepted at the Smith that, by the removal of the mili- 
tary and other similar acts, he did more for cur people 
than Mr. Tilden could have done. 

I knew him personally while President, anil was 
frequently with him afterward. The justification of 
his accepting the Presidency, from his standpoint, was 
the firm conviction, expressed to me, that the vote in 
certain Southern States was not correctly counted. 

This circumstance is recalled: When in Nashville. 
a few years ago, attending an Association of Charities, 
Mr. Hayes sat facing an old man, to whom I said, in 
cordial spirit. " We are loyal! " The response was, " If 
you are not, we will make you!" This remark irri- 
tated the ex-President very much, and he immedi- 
ately turned to me, remarking: "You will remember 
he was not one of the lighters.'' Mr. Hayes evidently 
would have relinked him, hut for the remark having 
been made by quite an old man. 



THINGS PERTINENT TO WAR TIMES. 



The editor of the Confederate Veteran has ever 
had a most earnest wish to promote the well being of 
the southern people, and especially to have it known 
that the Confederate soldier element is alive to issues 
Of the times. Stimulated with this desire, and feeling 
a persona], friendly interest in behalf of the family of 
President Harrison's brother, living in Tennessee, I 
wrote Gen. Harrison a letter soon after his election, 
in which I mentioned the circumstance of having been 
six months a prisoner in his city, Indianapolis; also 
of having barely escaped capture again at Resac'a, 
where he, Gen. Harrison, was promoted for gallantry ; 
and again of having confronted his brother in the bat- 
tle of Franklin. 1 stated that I knew his brother well, 
and felt that "our people," regardless of party, would 
be gratified if he would give him a good appointment. 
In the letter 1 explained that 1 was a Democrat, ami 
concluded by saying that an "acknowledgment is not 
expected," not wishing to encumber the President- 
elect with any care. To that letter the following re- 
sponse was received: "Though you have set me free 
from any obligation to acknowledge your letter of the 
L8th inst., it is so generous that 1 can not, accept the 
discharge from the pleasant duty of telling you how 
highly 1 appreciate your friendly words in behalf of a 
brother whose plan of life was spoiled by the call of 
his country to military service." 



"While ymi are writing about Joe Brown, you 
might say something of the pikes received recently by 
tli. Tennessee Historical Society." This suggestion 
was i licited by reference to the Georgia Senator's ex- 
traordinary career. 1 1 is connection with the war. his 
long official career as Governor, and his antagonisms 
with the Confederate Ail ministration at Richmond, arc 
matters of history. Conspicuous in this respect was his 
refusal to have Georgia troops sent out of that State. 

Concerning weapons, it will be remembered that 
Tennessee volunteers carried bowie knives. What an 
industry it was to get them ready! Trifling fellows, 
who were untidy in their dress, and trilling in every 
other sense, would work away in the sand, semiring 
their "butcher" knives, as if the brighter they glis- 
tened the more tremulous would be the foe, when the 
contemplated hand to hand encounter would begin. 
Soon they were allowed to rust and drop by the 
line of march. 

But as to the "Joe Brown pikes" — they were of a 
little more intelligent conception, particularly in 
anticipation that some Confederates would have 
to fight without guns. They consisted of two pieces 
of timber about six feet long, banded together 
with iron, the corners rounded, with an aperture near 
one end, in which a blade fifteen inches long was in- 
serted, and, by means of a spring, could be protruded 
at will, and firmly held in place. It is useless to say 
they were never used. The Historical Society had 
better label them with an explanatory note, for those 
who do not know of the silly things done in the be- 
ginning of the Confederate war would never imagine 
what thev were intended for. 



I was quite amused one morning about eight years 
ago at a remark of General Sherman, who was ray fel- 
low' passenger on the Western & Atlantic Railroad. 
As the train was running into Graysville, he pointed 
to the stone mill by the Chickamauga creek, an hun- 
dred yards away, and said: "An Englishman living 
here, made sabres for the Confederacy in that house." 
He referred to Mr. Gray, who was really an English 
subject. This Mr. Cray built the long tunnel at Tun- 
nel Hill, below Graysville, and was a man 'of great 
executive ability, but the "sabres" he made for Geor- 
gia troops are known as the "Joe Brown pikes." 

By the by, as one of the smallest soldiers in that 
campaign wherein Sherman, by constantly increased 
numbers, flanked again and again the Confederates 
under Johnston, compelling the latter to fall back 
1(H) miles during the "all-summer" campaign, I note 
the interesting coincidence that I was with Johnston 
on his first trip over that road by daylight after the 
war, and was with Sherman on his first, if not only 
journey afterward. Johnston's knowledge and rec- 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



ollection of local i tic-; was most remarkable after 
fifteen years. As the train darted along, turning its 
many short curves, he would point to places where 
batteries had been established, ami where resistance 
was intended. He explained, too, how the enemy 
managed to turn our right or left Hank. 

Johnston did not know, however, all the territory, 
for he said of his engineer, Lieutenant Buchanan, a 
few years ago when that capable officer was in Wash- 
ington to witness the transit of Venus, that he had 
planned many a battle from his maps without ever 
having seen the premises. 

The modest professor is mentioned in Johnston's 
Narrativeas "that very intelligent officer." Mr. Buch- 
anan's employment in the geodetic service of theGov- 

emment to survey Tennessee, a pursuit that he has 
followed through several vacations from his duties in 
the University at I. el. anon, was fortunate for the de- 
partment, according to official report. He has com- 
pleted the first duty assigned, and can tell the distance 
with astronomical accuracy, between Nashville, Knox- 
ville and many places intervening. 



MISSWG. 



On the journey referred to Sherman was much in- 
terested in passing scenery. While by the Chicka- 
mauga station he pointed to a particular locality, and 
said: "A negro stepped on a gun that lay in the mud ' 
there. It went off and wounded three of my men in 
the legs." When I told him of a recent journey with 
General Johnston along then', and how vividly he 
recalled many things, his face brightened with a pleas- 
ant smile, and he said: ''Was he through here?" 
What memories are recalled in this connection ' Sher- 
man issued a circular when he had pressed Johnston 
many miles back into Georgia, in which he said that 
if we had given up at a certain time we might have 
retained all our property, but we had lost that oppor- 
tunity, and he concluded with a warning that if we 
persisted much longer, we need not expect to escape 
with our lives. That threat intensified our men 
afresh. However, it seems that with all of his bitter- 
ness, a cordial personal relation ever existed between 
him and Johnston. 

General Sherman hail abundant evidence of the 
South's forbearance with him. The writer recalls this 
illustration: On that journey through Georgia thir- 
teen years ago, l(Hi or so of the citizens assembled to 
see him at Cartersville. He walked out on the plat- 
form and stood looking over the crowd, when some one 
said : "General, we have improved since you was here." 
"Yes," he replied, "we left a clean field for you." 
At this moment the "all aboard" was announced, and 
Sherman added: " I see you have the same depot, but ' 
you have put a new roof on it." Cartersville was in 
the area that he had lain waste with the torch, but 
not a word of reproach was spoken; neither did any 
one applaud him. 



Ofl duty near Malvern HUL, 

Foraged one of Hampton'* Legion, 
In a glen with running rill. 

'Twas In the Seven Days 1 Battle region. 

In a thicket, on grassy bank, 
(irew summer flowers and berries sweet. 

on Nature's couch the soldier sank 
And slept in this retreat. 

The battle rages in his dream. 
Battalions charge and caunons thunder. 

While beside him, near the Btream, 
Lies one down to death's dread slumber. 

The soldier starts! before Ills ryes. 
There on the sward with fruit and flowers, 

'I'll-' li.inv frame of a lost one Mrs. 

Bleached to whiteness by sun and showers. 

•■ \ mother's son. a brother or lover." 
Mused the Vet.; "from shot and shell hissing 

Wounded, had crept to cover. 
And this is how he came up missing." 

Ah, the numbers on that sad list 

( if " Missing "—Blue and (iray ! 
Lei us hope they'll be first to "hist!" 

When the roll is called on Judgment Day. 

A note with the above, from ('apt. B. H. Teague, of 

Aiken. S. C, explains: "While searching for wild 
strawberries on one of the battlefields during the war. 
I came across the -keleton of a Union soldier in a 
thicket, who had probably been killed during the 
' seven days' tight.' " 



SIX HUNDRED CONFEDERATE OFFICERS. 



HOW THBT HERE EXPO.SK/) TO CONFBDSRAT1 CANNON 
—A RETALIATORY MEASURE, 



The following story cometffrom J. L. Lemon, of Ac- 
worth. Ga., who says lie thinks the story has 
Keen published: 

" Doubtless you will oiler your columns as a medium 
for recording interesting historical incidents connected 
with the war. My experience while a prisoner was 
thrilling and tragic in many respects, and varied as 
the winds. 

"1 was in Gen. Longstreet's command in his move- 
ment to take Knoxville, in November, 1863, and was 
severely wounded and taken prisoner. Some time 
later 1 was removed to the penitentiary at Nashville, 
then to Camp Chase, and from there to Fori Delaware, 
where two thousand five hundred or more Confederate 
officers were confined. On our way from Camp Chase 
to Fort Delaware we passed through Columbus, Ohio, 
where I had a view(?) of the Ohio penitentiarv. 

" In the summer of 1864, six hundred of theofticers 
were taken from the pen at Fort Delaware and put 
aboard the steamer '('resent' and carried to Morris 
Island, victims of retaliation for some alleged wrong 
to the Federal prisoners at the hands of the Confeder- 
ate. authorities. On the way we planned an escape, 
the crew in charge of us being Confederate sympathiz- 
ers. We were to land at Georgetown, overpower our 
guards and the guards of the town, and escape. The 
steamer, on Hearing the shore, struck a bar and pre- 
vented its possibility. 

"When we were awaiting to be taken upon the isl- 
and we were without water, and suffered tortures from 



5° 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



tin- beat in our crowded condition. We were taken 
in charge <>n the island by a negro regiment, « ho were 
instructed to take all V. S. blankets, clothing, can- 
teens, and all other trinkets marked U. S., which they 
did, leaving some of our men nearly bare. We were 
kept under range of tin- Confederate batteries on Sul- 
livan ami James' Islands and battery wagons for forty- 
two 'lays. We obtained the water we drank while on 
the island by digging holes in the sand for the water 
to accumulate in : tins, you perceive, n as fine i ? i water 
in August! Our negro guards treated us roughly for 
awhile. Issuing our scanty rations to us. they poured 
the hardtack and thin slices of meat into the tent on 
the sand. By and by, through persuasion, we gained 
their sympathy and they were kinder to us. stealing 
for us extra rations and paying us most extravagant 
prices for our horn, bone, and wood rings, and other 
trinket- fashioned in our leisure. 

"We were removed to Fort Pulaski and Hilton 
Head. Some parties hail escaped from Andersonville, 
and said they were fed mi sour sorghum and eorn 
bread; in retaliation we were given pickles and refuse 
corn meal, the result of which had almost completely 
broken down our six hundred, none of whom were 
Scarcely aide to drag themselves along. 

"This awful affair has never been printed before, so 
far as I know. "I am very respectfully, 

"Joseph L. Lemon." 



GALLANT TENNESSEAN KILLED NEAR RICHMOND. 



This little Confederate Veteran lias put many 
people to looking up old documents that will ever be 
sacred to them. Mrs. T. S. Colley, of Franklin, kindly 
-end.- a copy of an article from the Richmond Enquirer, 
of July 17, 1862. Its literal reproduction will be in- 
teresting to young rcadej-s. as it breathes the spirit of 
the time that it was written. In Col. Shackleford's 
lnmor the Bivouac at Fayetteville was named. Maj. 
F. G. Buchanan is its President, and W. H. Cashine 
tin- Secretary: 

" Among the noble brave who fell in the recent bat- 
tles near Richmond, perhaps no one deserves more 
honorable mention than Lieut. John C. Shaekleford, 
of the First Tennessee Regiment, who fell on Friday, 
the 27th of June, while gallantly leading his regiment 
in the first charge at Gaines' Mills. Col. Shaekleford 
was in the battle of Seven Pines, and also commanded 
his regiment in the light at Ellison's Mills on Thurs- 
day before the battle in which he fell. In every ac- 
tion, though but twenty-six years of age, he showed 
himself to possess in an eminent degree the qualities 
of a good commander, to w it., coolness, self-possession, 
and bravery. So gallantly did he demean himself 
upon the field in the thickest of the light that the sol- 
diers would often exclaim: 'Surely Col. Shackleford's 
nerves are steel!" When shot he was waving his 
sword above his head and cheering his men on, but 
so thick and terrible was the leaden storm that our 
men were ordered to retreat. A soldier offered to take 
him oil' the Held, but he said : 'No: it is no use; take 
care of yourself." lie was universally popular, and 
was t'ne favorite of his own regiment. The First Ten- 
nessee will ever cherish his memory with the most 
grateful recollections, lie was a most ardent and en- 
thusiastic devotee to the southern cause, was among 



the first to respond to his country's call, and was in 
the service of the Confederate States in Virginia he- 
fore his native State had seceded from the old Union. 
With him love of the Confederacy was a passion, and 
he seemed to but carry his. life in hi- hand, that he 
might throw it upon the altar of his own loved native 
South whenever her interest demanded it. His devo- 
tedly affectionate parents, brothers and sisters, are 
sadly bereaved in the loss of so noble, gifted, and 
promising a son and brother, but may they be con- 
soled in the reflection that he died at his post, in the 
full discharge of his whole duty, and now fills a hero's 
grave.'' 

<ol. Shaikh ford was commanding Col. (now Gov- 
ernor) Pete Tumey's regiment at the time of his death. 
The fatality in this famous regiment was awful. When 
this genial, brave man was killed Col. Turney was suf- 
fering from an almost fatal wound. He was succeeded 
by McLauglin, who was also killed, and he by Maj. 
Buchanan, who was wounded. 



TO DAUGHTERS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS. 



Dead Girls — In these days, when disintegration 
threatens to overturn society, when i>erpltxed philos- 
ophers bring up the question of single tax as a rem- 
edy for all existing governmental disorder, we south- 
ern women keep one little old adage locked close to 
our hearts — "The hand that rocks the cradle rules the 
world." It speaks to our hearts as nothing else does, 
and we are satisfied to do our part through this me- 
dium. In preceding generations the women of our 
Southland have made it the very birthplace of enno- 
bling qualities. In this connection I speak especially 
of the kindergarten. It is progressive in the highest 
sense. Woman's nature is in thorough sympathy with 
that of the little child. Let us advance shoulder to 
shoulder under the Kentucky motto, " In unity there 
is strength." We look on the little child as a beauti- 
ful plant given to us by our Divine Master. The child 
plant is growing, growing, growing! He will be a 
man — an element for good or evil in society even be- 
fore we know it. Quick, then, let tis surround him 
with happy, moral influences, because the tender roots 
of his nature are reaching out and they will assimi- 
late what thev find. You remember who said, "Suf- 
fer little children to tome unto me, and forbid them 
not." If society is cold and selfish — if every man is 
for himself, with no interest in his fellows, it is be- 
cause the religion Christ taught did not touch his soul 
when a little child. If religion was made a joy to the 
child, so that he would love it, and take it in, and as- 
similate it as the Mowers do the sunshine, the world 
would grow better in his manhood. Does the present 
state of society tell you there is anything lacking? 
Man has a three-fold nature — mental, moral, and phys- 
ical, to be supplied with food. The statistics of peda- 
gogy show - that in preceding generations (Jrccian edu- 
cation finally failed because it gradually lost sight of 
the moral side. Shall we fail for this cause? The 
kindergarten meets the higher demands as well. 

There are kindergartens in most of the large cities 
of the South, and there should be in the towns and in 
the country. Women of the South, this is our herit- 
age, and 1 tell you that one hour with children is 
worth more than all other antidotes for worry, care, 
and sorrow. Mas. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



5i 



GREAT SOURCE OF WEALTH F<>1! THE SOUTH. 



All the South hails joyfully the introduction of that 
which will tend to the practical development of her 

resources. For this reason the CONFEDERATE VETERAN 

emphasizes with pride the intelligence, which is assur- 
ing, that the manufacture of steel is to be a most ben- 
eficent factor for us all. The following extract from a 
letter to Messrs. .1. II. Imnan. of New York; X. Bax- 
ter, Jr., and A. M. Shook, of Nashville all of whom 
were Confederates — written by the Hon. Abram S. 
Hewitt, of New York, will he read with gratifying in- 
terest. Tile letter is Hot of Verv recent (late, hut till' 

facts are not known by the people generally. Mr. 
Hewitt, in the investment referred to at Chattanooga, 
leul the co-operative aid of his father-in-law, the bene- 
factor, the late Peter Cooper, of New York: 

"1 may be pardoned for recalling the fact that I was 
the purchaser of the rolling mill at Chattanooga, from 

the Government at the close of the war. and put it 
in operation for the purpose of show ing that the iron 
business could he successfully carried on in the South- 
ern States. From the very outset I was aware of the 
difficulty in the way of making steel, due to the pres- 
ence of phosphorus in your ores, and hence 1 watched 
the progress of the basic process w it h tin- greatest pos- 
sible interest, and so long ago as 1862 1 was aware of 
the experiments made by Mr. Snelus, which Berved to 
show that lime could he used to neutralize phosphorus 
in pig iron. Messrs. Thomas & Gilchrist, however, 
first made a successful application of this principle, 
and I always intended, it the works remained under 
my control, to establish t he manufacture of basic steel 
in Chattanooga. For this purpose I secured the orig- 
inal control of the patents in this country, but cir- 
cumstances occurred which made it impossible tor me 
to execute my plans. 

" It was, however, with the greatest possible satisfac- 
tion that I was able to give Mi. Shook the informa- 
tion which led to his visit to Europe, and to his study 
01 the process at Brymbo Works, conducted by my 
friend, Mr. Darby, where 1 knew that the difficulties 
were even greater than those which existed in the 
Southern States, and that they had been successfully 
surmounted. Nevertheless, it required much money, 
great energy and high courage on the part of the gen- 
tlemen who associated themselves together for the in- 
troduction of this new process. They have done their 
work well, and tiny are entitled not only to honor, 
hut to profit, which 1 hope they will realize. The 
South i- the natural home of the basic process, just as 
the North must necessarily he the great producer of 
acid steel. It is an interesting fact that these products 
have each their proper held of usefulness, and that the 
basic steel of the South will undoubtedly finds mar- 
ket north of the ( >hio river, just as the pig iron of the 
South has invaded the Northern territory. 

"' It has often been said that steel will drive out iron, 
hut the fact is that the production of puddled iron 
has increased and not diminished since the introduc- 
tion of the improved steel processes, for some pur 
poses iron will continue to he used, hut when basic 
steel shall he supplied at low cost in adequate quanti- 
ties, the domain in which iron can he used will he 
greatly restricted. The future, therefore, for the new 



product is very bright, and the demand will soon take 
all of this admirable material which can he supplied 
at a reasonable cost. 

" 1 am afraid the Southern people do not appreciate 
how much they owe to the managers of the great rail- 
way system of the South for the remarkable progress 
which has been made in the development of the coal 
and iron resources of the Southern country. 1 know 
of nothing in the history of industry more remarkable 
than the intelligence with which the railway mana- 
gers hav< recognized the necessity tor low freights on 
raw materials, and if to-day the South has demon- 
strated its ability to hold its own in the markets of the 
North for its products, this result is due entirely to the 
views which Mr. Inman and other gentlemen asso ; 
ciated with him ami in other railway systems have 
adopted in dealing with tie great problems of 1 
portation. Instead of striv ing t" embarrass the plans 
and restrict the powers of these benefactors of tie 
South, the Southern States ought to give them carh 
blanch to .any out their plans on the broadest po^si- 
ble scale, and free from injurious conditions which 
only impede the work of production, and increases the 
cost of commodities to the consumer. To- 1 lay the South 
has the cheapest transportation in the world, and hence 
it i< emphatically the most prosperous region in the 
world. 

/ ETTER FROM II. M COOK. 



Belton, Ti \ v-. January 23, 1893. 
The sample copies of the Confederate Veteran 

forwarded to me were received, and as the result of an 
hour's work with them, on the streets of Helton. I 1 n- 
close herewith the names of seventeen subscribers, 
accompanied by postoffice order for $8.50. 

This publication in the interest of tie- Davis Monu- 
ment, at the remarkable low price of 50 cent- per an- 
num, was a happy thought, and if properly distrib- 
uted will d<> more t" revive the seemingly collapsed 
interest manifested in that subject throughout the 
South than any other agency. Two years ago enthu- 
siasm on the subject was unbounded. The Jeff I'av is 
Monument was the principal topic, liberal contribu- 
tions were made throughout the Southern Stati B, and 
especially in Texas: even in the little town of II. It m 
1 raised two hundred dollars, which was no exception 
to the liberality of other towns, This money was for- 
warded to (on. \V. F. Cabell, the Confederate Vice 
President for Texas. 

Altera time, however, the enthusiasm measurably 
subsided; theSouth's great sorrow was in sum. degree 
mollified by time, the great healer, and action in the 
monumental question was held in abeyance. As no 
report was ever published of the amount of money 
received from the different States ami sources, the 
public was left in ignorance of results. Now. the 
question propounded by the people is, How much has 
been collected, and what has been done with the 
money? While I have no doubt hut the money con- 
tributed has been honestly cared tor, yet I know that 
with the masses tie money question is a dedicate one: 

hence, for the benefit of tin' incredulous, ami for the 
satisfaction and encouragement of all, I think it would 
facilitate the work very materially to make a complete 
exhibit of the amount received from each State, and 
all sources, since the conception of the monument 
idea, and amount on hand to date, through the Con- 
federate Veteran. 



52 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



SOME SOUTHERN WAR BEROES. 



MSMBBBS OF Till: (JALLANT OLD WARD OF I 111: CON- 
FEDERACY. 



[Tin- st Louie l llobi Democrat 

Passing, one by one. into the Bilent land, the heroic 
leader.-; who struggled desperately to save "the lost 
cause" have been dropping out of mortal ken during 
tin past quarter of a century, until now a very small 
group is left. Very interesting are tin' figures which 
make up the little hand, men of hoary hair and falter- 
ing Btep they are now, hut their names recall memo- 
ries of the days when they were active and alert, brav- 
ing shot and shell "ii the field and cheerfully hearing 
privation and hardship in the camp or on the march. 
In those time-, in the cities of the East and the farm 
houses and homes of the West, their names were exe- 
crated, ami on the hotly contested border land their 
approach was dreaded with sinking heart. The new 
generation which has grown up to manhood since that 
time has learned to look at them in a more kindly 
light. Their valor and their devotion are come into 
recognition; their disappointment and their failure 
plead for them, and we remember that they, too, are 
Americans whose prowess does honor to our race. 

Busily occupied with business affairs in New Or- 
leans, the last surviving general of the Confederacy, 
Gen. Pierce Gustave T. Beauregard, still exhihits the 
untiring, indomitable energy which characterized him 
during the four years of war. In spite of his seventy- 
four years, he retains the old pugnacity of his youth 
and middle age. He does not wield the old weapons, 
hut the man who has the hardihood to cross the old 
general's path and oppose his plans speedily learns 
that he has an antagonist who can adapt himself to 
any mode of warfare, and has lost none of his strategic 
skill. 

The general has a certain right to speak authorita- 
tively, so far as experience can give the right, he hav- 
ing had the honor and the responsibility of opening 
The hall, by directing the attack on Fort Sumter, and 
of commanding, in conjunction with Gen. J. E. John- 
ston, at the battle of Bull Run. The general explains 
with graphic force how, if that battle had been fought 
as he planned it, and if he had been permitted, even 
after the battle had taken place, to add his later plans, 
he could have"crushed Patterson, liberated Maryland, 
and captured Washington." He surrendered with Gen. 
-1. K. Johnston to Gen. Sherman, in April, 1865. 

Associated with Gen. Beauregard of late years is that 
other prominent soldier of the South, Gen. Jubal A. 
Marly. The two men are congenial associates, having 
many characteristics in common. The same dash and 
impetuosity, the same impatience of contradiction or 
control, distinguish Early as they do Beauregard, and 
the same effects arc seen in both their lives in numer- 
ous and bitter enemies. Gen. Early, who is seventy- 
six years old, has been a soldier since boyhood, though 
more than once he has abandoned a martial career for 
law or business. He had a West Point training, and 
first smelled powder in the Florida War of 1837. lie 
quitted the army at the close of the war and com- 
menced the practice of law; subsequently he sat in 
the Virginia Legislature for two years. The outbreak 
of the Mexican War lured him 'from the pursuits ol 
peace. He served as a major of volunteers, and acted 
as Governor of Monterey the last two months of its 



occupation. He returned to the practice of law when 
tin- army was disbanded, and served for ten years as 
attorney of the commonwealth. He was appointed 
colonel on tin- outbreak of the Rebellion, and took 
part in the battles of Hull Run, Fredericksburg, and 
Gettysburg. In 1864 he was sent to tin- Valley of the 
Shenandoah. There, after a few minor successes, he 
fought the disastrous battle of Cedar Creek. Six 
months later, in ( October, 1864, a still more severe dis- 
aster hefell him at Waynesboro, where Gen. Custer 
almost annihilated his command. Lee, who still re- 
tained his faith in Early's capacity, was unable to re- 
sist the popular feeling in the army against the de- 
feated general, and felt himself obliged to remove him 
from his command. In his letter relieving him from 
duty, Lee, with the delicacy of the true gentleman, 
softened the blow by assuring Early of his own regard, 
but reminded him that the country and the army 
would naturally judge by results, and consequently 
there could be no doubt that his influence would in- 
crease the already serious difficulties accumulating in 
Southwest Virginia. Early at once quitted the army 
and spent some time in Europe. 

A conspicuous figure among the survivors of the 
great struggle is Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner, who a 
few years ago was elected Governor of Kentucky. He 
was one of the pall-bearers at the funeral of Gen. Grant, 
whom he always admired and honored. He was the 
general to whom Grant sent the dispatch which stirred 
so much enthusiasm in the North early in Grant's ca- 
reer, and which history has immortalized. The North 
thought it had the right ring, and that the man who 
wrote it was the man for the hour. The words, which 
soon became famous, were: ''I propose to move imme- 
diately upon your works." This was at Fort Donelson. 
Buckner's two superiors, Officers Floyd and Pillow, 
had made their escape, when they found the position 
no longer tenable; but he declared that he would stay 
with his men and share their fate. He remained, and 
after the capitulation was sent as a prisoner of war to 
Boston, Mass., where he was kept until exchanged, six 
months later. On his return to the field he com- 
manded under Bragg in Tennessee. He fought at 
Murfreesboro and Chickamauga, and surrendered w'lth 
E. Kirby Smith at Baton Rouge, in May, 1865. Buck- 
ner was another of the West Point graduates, and had 
also, like so many of his comrades and foes, done gal- 
lant service in the Mexican War. He is now sixty- 
nine years old. 

Now sitting in the United States Senate for his na- 
tive State of Georgia, is another brave officer of the 
southern army, Gen. John Brown Gordon, who has 
just passed his sixtieth birthday. He hears on his 
body evidences of his valor in the shape of eight 
wounds received in battle. He entered the Confeder- 
ate Army as a captain of infantry, but before the close 
of the war had risen to the rank of lieutenant general. 
He was one of the officers who surrendered to Grant 
at Appomattox. 

Last, but not least remembered, of the old chivalric 
guard of the Confederacy come those sturdy heroes, 
Stephen I >. Lee and Ambrose P. Stewart. Gen. Lee 
now holds a position of responsibility in a university 
at Starkville, Miss., while Gen. Stewart, who is living 
quietly at Oxford, Miss., was recently appointed Con- 
federate commissioner on the committee for the con- 
struction of a national Cemetery on the site of the 
old battlefield of Chickamauga, where so many of the 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



53 



sons of the Confederacy fell fighting for the stars ami 
bars. 

The animosities of the war have long since been 
buried, and by none more completely than by the men 

who fought most bravely and sacrificed most in the 
struggle. The North unites most heartily with the 
South in recognizing the heroism of the men who 
fought so gallantly fur their convictions. In the clos- 
ing years of their lives the chieftains of the old Con- 
federacy enjoy the love and honor that is accorded to 
true soldiers, and when they finally pass away from 
the scenes of their struggles they will not lie among 
those who are soon forgotten. 



RE\fF.\fRRANCE OF GREAT OCCASIONS. 



Observations in New York on the centennial of tin 1 
evacuation by the British; again, of Washington's 
first inauguration, which occurred by the bronze statue 
near the sul i-t reasury in Wall Street ; again, in ( Ihicago, 
where ninety thousand people were seated comfortably , 
and nearly as many more standing or strolling under 
one roof; or hack in war times, when forty thousand 
( Confederate soldiers were under review by < ten. Joseph 
E. Johnston and the President of the Confederate 
States at Grenada, Miss., when every soldier could see 
every other. 

The scene referred to above in Chicago was perhaps 
the most remarkable that will be witnessed by any- 
body of this generation. The writer was of a group 
stationed about fifty yards from the center towards the 

eastern end. At that extreme of the building there 
was an elevated platform, on which there were more 
than five thousand people. It was under the fine light 
of a day suited to such occasions, hut the distance was 
SO pieat that none of our party could tell whether they 
were children or soldiers, not even whether they were 
men or women. Indeed, it was so great it seemed 
certain that no human voice could have penetrated 
the distance of the building. In this connect ion "the 
rebel yell." so thrillingly described in the Confeder- 
ate Veteran for January, is recalled. It might have 
been heard. That wonderful assembly in a building 
covering over forty acres, and the building, too, may 
have attention in subsequent issues. 



Rev. F. W. E. Peschau, of Wilmington, X. ('., hut 
formerly of Nashville, writes : "Success to you; it is 
full of interest." Mr. Peschau is the chaplain of Vet- 
erans in North Carolina. On a recent visit to the old 
" blockade city," Mr. Peschau took kindly interest in 
finding the old Freeman residence, where 1 was enter- 
tained with thorough hospitality when hoard was sixty 
dollars per day ami when my salary was eleven dol- 
lars per month. The genial minister reminds me of a 
great event at Wilmington last summer, when Gen. 
F. 1). Hall, who is vigilant for the Davis Monument, 
had twelve hundred to thirteen hundred of the wound- 
ed, crippled, and maimed ones visit the seashore, where 
they hail free board, etc., for three days, after having 
had free railroad transportation from all parts of the 
State, lie said he had never seen a more pathetic 



sight, "these brave soldiers, injured in so many ways. 
The chaplain preached to them midst the roar of the 
sea waves breaking on the shore, and these men sang, 
as with one voice, 

• Nearer, my God, to Thet ! 

It was a sweet, sublime scene, and many a tear rolled 
down the war-worn cheeks of these way-worn war- 
riors." 



GREETING FROM WASHIXGTON. 



From the Nation's Capital, from the shores of the 
Potomac, the .lames, and the beautiful valleys and 
mountains of our section, and many loving hearts, a 
cordial welcome is watted to you. 

To preserve the memory of our departed heroes, and 
care tor the living who are dependent, is largely wo- 

man's work, which she deems her privilege and pleas- 
ure, even as she smiled through her tears and said to 
them a quarter i if a century ago. " Your country calls ; 
go, and God bless you." 

The writer is not willing to admit that chivalry in 
America i- dead, or that southern women are ready to 
accept any substitute for it. We all honor ami Love 
each other, and if we have been too poor since the war 
to show our sympathy and respect in a substantial 
way, let us rejoice that the time has passed. We can 
easily take up the privileges of the changed South, 
without giving up or forgetting the glories of the old. 

The Smith ha- nobly worked out her independence, 
ami we believe -he will contribute liberally to the 
cause we all 1<>\ e. Those who have not money to give 
may appeal confidently to the rich, ami where hearts 
are united purses fly open. The noble work begun 
will go on. 

Enclosed find, pll a8e, a small amount for the grand 
monument. 1 could not he happy without knowing 
that it included my mite. It will he built by those 
who are able to do it. and I hope, too, that the day is 
not t'ar distant when not a single uncared for Confed- 
erate will be found any where. Oncemore,"God bless 
them all." says the wife of one of the bravest of them 
all. Alice Trueheart Bui k. 

Washington, V. < '. 

THE SAME CANTEEN. 



i here are bonds of all sorts in this world of ours. 
Fetters of friendship una tics -a flowers, 

\mi true lover f s knots. I ween; 
The girl Mini the i»\v are bound by a kiss. 
Hut there's never a bond, eld friend, like this, 

We have drank from tin- same Canteen! 

It w:is sometimes water, and sometimes milk, 
\ini Bometlmes apple-jack "fine us silk:" 

But whatever the tipple has been 
We shared It together in bane or bliss. 
And I warm to you, friend, when I think of this, 
We drank from the same Canteen! 

The rich and ureal sit down to dine, 

They quafl '" each other in sparkling wine, 

From glasses of crystal and green: 
Bui I guess in their golden potations they miss 
The warmth of regard to he found in this. 

We drank from I lie- sanu Canteen! 

We have shared our h'ankets ami tents together, 

And have marched and foughl in all kinds of weather, 

And hungry and full we have been; 
Had days of battle and days of rest. 
But this memory I cling tii and love the best, 

We drank from the SWM Canteen! 

For when WOUnded I lav on lie renter slope. 
With my blood flowing fast and but little hope 

Upon Which Day faint spirit could lean ; 
oil! then i remember you crawled to my side, 
Vnd bl iinu so fast ii seemed both must have died. 

We drank from the same Canteen. 



54 



COX FE DER ATE VETE RAN . 



THE DAVIS MONUMENT FUND. 



INT OF lllnsi: Wlln HAVE CONTRlRUTKli. 



The li-t of contributors ia arranged under two heads, 
First, those whose names are given, and second, the 
sums collected where the names of donors are nol 
known. It i- earnestly requested that for next issue 
names be -applied for the other lists, so the record of 
contributors may be as complete as | •• ■>> i 1 > 1< ■. This 
important list is incomplete. It will be revised and 
republished. Bach name represents one dollar: 

ALABAMA. 

ANmsTON Through Mrs. R. Gardner, 821, 

Birmingham 3 I. Buford; through Mrs I! M Gard- 
ner, two hundred dollars. 

Eutaw -Sanders' Camp, mx dollars. 

Gadsden — J Aiken, \V < '• Brockway and A L Glenn, 
$5; Win Chandler, A .1 Collingsworth, I. W Dean, A 
B Dunny, W A Dungan, W II Denson,85; II G Earnest, 
Frank* Haysdon, M L Hicks, I. E Humphreys, Meek 
A- Johnson, 15; .1 II Standifer, Abe Thompson, -I E 
Whaley, R A Mitchell, R Goldman and L Smith, 
of Queen City Bank, $5. 

Greenville- I. aura E Abrams, E R Adams, J T 
Beeland, -I G Daniel & Co, D G Dunklin, W .1 Dunk- 
lin. Dunn & Ezekiel.C B Herbert, I. M Lane, Robt 
A Lee, J A McGehce, Chas Newman, Chas Newman, 
T W Peagler, Wm Pierce, Mrs W Pierce, Mrs R V Por- 
i. r, .1 I; Porterfield, .1 B Powell, .1 (' Richardson, F (' 
Smith, .1 (' Steiner, -I M Steiner, S .1 Steiner, A Stein- 
hart, A G Stewart, T .1 Thomas, Rev G R Upton, J II 
Wilson, Mrs E S V Wilson. 

Hintsvii i i Mi-- Jeanie Sheffey. 

Mobile -I R Burgett, W W Dugger, \'an Dorn sta- 
tion: WG Duggar, Gallion station; Miss M B Kirk- 
bride, T T Roche, Louise I! Sprague, -I I! Tompkins, 
.1 I. Tucker, Price Williams, Jr. 

Montgomery — Mrs M I) Bibb, Miss-Jennie I! Crom- 
melin ; through Mrs M D Bibb, 81 13.85. 

Pratt Mines— D M B Hasslet, -I T Massingen, T E 
Mitchell, .1 G Moore, W X Polk, .1 W Randall, I, M 
Reese, J A Rhode3, I' .1 Rogers, 82: W I. Rogers, C A 
Simmon-, E A Smith, Walton A- Peteel, E E Wiggins. 

Ti si i mbia— Through Col. A. II. Kellar, $13.15. 

Union Springs— D S Bethune, Virginia A Black 
mon, X M Blidsoe, II D Bryan, Annie E Buford, J It 
Buford,H P Coleman, Mrs SJ Foster,CC Frazer, Mrs 
X II Frazer, W II Fuller, E II Goodwin, R II Hajas, 
Annie I. Hobdy, Jennie McKay Hobdy, J B Hobdy, 
Marie Hobdy, Mary Hobdy, It L Hobdy, R I, Hobdy, 
Jr., Chas L Jinks, A Mil.-'. Mrs F M Moseley, Mrs A 
B Phillips, Mrs .1 E Pickett, W W Rainer, f V Ran- 
dle, E T Ranclle, J L Roberts. 

ARKANSAS. 

Arkadelphia- -■) II Abraham, It T Cook, DT Dale, 

T M Ewing.J A Ross, C C Scott, John S ker, $2.50 

each: Geo Fuller, $5; C K Boswell, F .1 Carpenter, J 
W Conger, Adam Clark,. I II Crawford, E L Jones, C 
V Murray, E II McDonald, EC McDonald, Ed Thomas, 
A W Wilson, .1 W Wilson. 

A i gusta— James Eblin. 

Batesvili.E Nathan Adler, Simon Adler, .lames 
A Luster, John F Allen, W E Bevens,J WCase,Jae A 



(aiter. .1 I' Coffin, K M Desha, W .1 Erwin, D C 
Ewing, John W Ferrill,J C Fitzhugh, E L Givens, S 
A Hail, II M Hodgc,TJ Home, W B Lawrence, T M 
Mack, Robl Neill, T .1 Owens, I X Reed, James Ruth- 
erford, M A Wycough, M A R Wycough. 

El 1 »ou ido W II Appleton. 

I Iope M r- C A Forney 

Hot Springs — Dr Thomas E Holland, five dollars. 

Little Rock -Hon. John G. Fletcher, $11.25. 

Moori field Jesse A Moore, •' E Ross. 

Morrili.ton West Humphreys. 

FLORIDA. 
Jacksonville -Gen. William Baya, $500. 
Sandford C II Adkins. It S Dickens, ('apt •» S 
Tarver, Col A M Thrasher. 

Sanibel Isi.ami — Mrs Letitia A Xutt. Miss Nannie 
Nutt, live dollars. 

GEORGIA. 

Americus — CB Hudson, $2; W E Murphy. 

Atlanta — E L Anthony, Ceo T Beeland, Charles 
Beermann A Co. $15; .1 L Bishop, F C Bitgood, B M 
Blackburn, W II Black, $2; I. R Bleckly, $5: X S 
Blum, $2; S I) Bradwill, $2: .1 I> llra.lv, '$2; Robert 
Brazelton, G S Brewster, $2; EC Brown, S E Brown, 
T.I Burney, David .1 Bush, $2; Milton A Candler, s 
N Chapman, .1 II clit'ton, Philip Cook, $5; II II Cobb, 
A E Cox, C J Daniel, II R Daman, M K Dennis, . I A 
Foote, L I! Folsom, W E Fonti, Harry Frank, $2; 
Arnold Gedman, M B Gilmox, W C Glenn, $5; Peter 
G Grant, II II Green, $2; D It Drover. It G (in inn. -I 
L Harrison. Rev W M Haves, $2; W M Hawkes, It II 
Hightower, -las K Hines, $5; Jerry Holmos, Joseph 
Jacobs, $2; II Jennings, Mark W Johnson, J C Joiner, 
GeoH Jones, $2; -1 Win Jones, 850; Jas-L Key, 82: 
Dr J -I Knott. sj; Lamar & Rankin, $5; S HLandrum, 
Thos .1 Leftwick, $5; Walter T Mc Arthur, 82; D E 
McCarty, Hy McCaw, B L Mcintosh, $2 : C K Mad- 
dox,$5; I II Martin, $2; II A Matthews, V A Menard, 
CW Morgain, F II Moses, A .1 Moss, J W Nelms, $2; 
It T Nesbitt, $5; WM Newbern,$2; Newton, Baker 
& Co, II I. Nippert, 82; Robert A Xishett, 82; John 
Perry, $2; Wm II 1! Phelps, $2; .1 B Pickett. P 
Roman, $5; Lavender Ray, 82 ; K Reed, II N Ried, 
82; Sidney Root, $10; W E Seabrook, Geo W Scott, 
82.".: W L Seddon. $5; John W Shackelford. A (J 
Smart, 82; Burgess Smith, John Clay Smith, $2; Hoke 
Smith, $50; W -I Speairs, -I C Steerman, 82; It E 
Stockton, $2; -I D Stokes, Jos Thompson, 85; B Vig- 
noux,82; C Z Weinmaster, 82; W A Wright, 82; A 
It Wright, 82; Wm A Wright, 85. 

Augusta— Patrick Walsh and others, $400.91; Wm 
II Fleming. 

Arlington- II C Heffield, $2.50. 

Blackshear— A I' Brantley, Nettie Brantley, Henry 
J Smith, Jennie Smith. 

Blitch- -lames Young. 

Carrollton -I M Hewitt, two dollars. 

CEDARTOWN— I II Sanders, two dollars. 

( Ihu'kamauga -S F Parrott. 

Crawford -I G Gibson, two dollars. 

Danville T I. Hill, S W Sapp. 

Dri'.i.iN T I. Criner, John M Stubbs. 

Georgetown — John (' Guilford. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 55 

Glennville — F P Collins, five dollars. William Rodes, J (' Rogers, .1 Woodson Royster, S P 

Handy \V L Crouder Salter, S G Sharp, J H Shropshire, Mrs .1 II Shrop- 

Macon-J Bell, Mrs' A S Cope, J W Hinton, $2 Bnirp ' **** le Smith Richard Squires, Michael Sulfi- 

each; Jas M Sapp, Chas Herbst; Bibb Countv Associ- Y, a »; J ' ' '' ! 1 , "'\ 1 ', A "STwV pin , g i? n u r'i 

,• oicono " I \ atieo. VV ilia \ llcy, Mat W alton. John H \V ioh , 

ation, ?l().).U ( .). , ... . ,.. .,-• 1 i 1. 1 n , , 

' , , Jesse Woodi'un; a briend, J 1! Jewell, gave two dol- 

Milledgeville— J C Woodward. larseach; Miss Nannie Smith and Solomon VanMeter, 

Moher— B F Hoodspette. five dollars each. 

Montezuma — E Chambers. Of the foregoing, seventy-five dollars was collected 

Pai.atka Cant S II Gray. Dv ^ rs - " A. Spurr, and remitted to the Treasure]' at 

, ,,,, ' Q ,, Richmond: and fourteen dollars, collected by Mrs. 0. 

SMiTHBORO-James rhomas Smith. L Bradley, remitted totheGenerkl Agent at iLhville. 

Sonoraville-P T Reese Louisvilli Miss Martha A. Sneed, $10; Miss Jo- 

Spakta — Through Mrs. Middlebrooks, 141.75. sephine Walker. 

Sylvania— E W Frey. p, MBR0K i R T Chilton. Mrs. R T Chilton. 

Temple— Robert II Faber. I;, SSEIjLVII ,i E _T .1 Bailey, 16.05; .1 B Briggs, John 

Van's Valley — Alex White. W Caldwell, $5 each; Dr R X Beauchamp, George R 

Walkersville — .1 W Johnson Beall, Wilson Beard, R B Chastain, Joseph Cumbett, 

Dr B !•' Kidd, W R McCarty, James M McCutchen, 

ILLIN0I8. John G. Orndorff, William Smith. ('. W. Swanson, M 

Chicago Col G Forrester. (Jen W A C Ryan, Mrs B Stovall. 

Ryan, Col .1 G Ryan, Mrs E A Shannon. James Fen- LOUISIANA. 

tress. Mansfield .1 W Adams, C W Blair, 15; T.I Book- 

Lilly — E W Bacon, Miss Lilly Bacon. er. F M Brownfield, C T Baunnman, Henry Hums. 

Mackinaw— Mrs I, E Brock. •'." ,m s Bailey, James Brown, Dr B D Cooper, Dr W 

N Cunningham, Cash, -las Dilzell, DeSoto Democrat, 

INDIANA. $5; .1 B Dillon, .1 Douglas, VV .1 Elam, C W Elam, W 

Evansville— A .1 Thomas. live dollar-. '•' Fraser, S B Foster, E N Foster, Dr J W Fair. Win 

, ,.1'mh c j 11 ' Goss, $5; I D Gibbons, John Glossill, S A Guy, R I" 

Indianapolis— G I Miller, live dollars ,..,, . .... wo -a n win 1 ii-n' 

Gibbs, L H Hanson, \\ I 1 1 all, \\ I Haden, J E Hewett, 

INDIAN TERRITORY John Huson, W B Hewitt. A M Hewitt. I! K Jenkins, 

„ . '.. ' '. M ,, ., ,, ' ... . ,. , .. 85; W T Jackson, .1 B Lee, .1 T McClanahan, W II 

v,"" T " : r,'~; . ^ \! J'l\ \ ACantrell, M: ,. lin w E May R R Murphy, VV I. Mintei r \ 

\ Gray, 82; ( Hayden, AG McDaniel. Nabors, J M Nabors. E R Nabore, w I Pegins, K It 

Pryor Creek— Tom A Hancock. Pickels, J W Parsons, A V Roach, C VV Page, 1'. I'. 

Sherman— M L Elzy. Powell, G Rives, Sallie Rascoe, E B Rogers, J II Ras- 

coe, (J Roberts, P II Ricks. Dr A V Roberts, $2.50; .1 

KENTUCKY. Reiley, Albert Rives, M Ricks, Jae A Rives, J C Hue-, 

Chilesburg— Richard A Spurr. Capt W P Sample, $5; Dr S .1 Smart, (' .1 S te, VV 

Fairview— Bethel Sunday Scl 1. $8.50; 1! W How, E Singleton, DrStoaltesDrW Sutherland, OH PSam- 

ner,$3; I" E Downer, 82.50; S R Jesup, I'. D Lackey- P ,e > E NN Sn < IV, ,. and > *'. '! ,, ",', i A, ,T S '.T'l'-' 

H E Morton,; J. I, Mosely, R I. Mosely. $1.50 each; Taylor Sam Williams, VV N VVilliams, B VV iller, B N 

W I' Vanillin ' ' Wimple. I .1 Williams, .1 B Williams,! has P Will- 

" " ,...„„ iams.J B Williams. Jr., DrJF Walker, O V Wemple, 

Frankfort— \* 1 Havens. , Q WemplC] L B W ilcox, .1 L Williams, G B VVill- 

Georgetown — A H Sinclair, five dollars. iams. Miss Belle Taylor. 

Henderson-R II Cunningham VV M Hanna, M ,,,„., from ( . n]A w |h „, Treasurer For Louisi . 

M Kimmel, J W Lockett, Sights & Johnston, Mont- an ^ Col w ,, L AA ,;. New Orleans; 
gomery Memtt, P .1 R Reeve. . I .1 Reeve, p k Snead, 

F XV:llk,>r - June 22, John T. Block, La. Div. A. N. V 8 102 65 

Hopkinsville— W B Dicken. June 22, Wm. McLaughlin, Vet. C. S. C 54 00 

Lexington— Mrs S R Anderson, R T Anderson, (' s July 1, J. Y. Gilmore, La. Div. A. N. V 55 00 

Bell, Sr., W S Bell, Mrs Robert Berry, John Boyd, July 1. -1. 1'.. Levert, Sugar and Rice Ex Km 50 

Hart Brown, .1 (' Bryant, R S Bullock, Mrs John' H July 1, .1. B. Levert, Vet. C. S. C 40 50 

Carter. John II Carter, CC Calhoun, W II Cassell, Mrs July 1. Jos. Demoruelle, < '. II. St. Paul 22 00 

W II Cassell, A R Chinn, .lames B Clay, Horace Cole- July 8, Lawson L. Davis, C. H. St. Raul 43 00 

man, Cicero Coleman, A A DeLong, C A DeLong, M July 9, Col. Wm. R. Johnston, Soldiers and 

.1 Durham, Jerry Dclph, Edward F razor. Graves & Cox, Sons of Soldiers of Avery's Salt Mines 11 '_'■"» 

•I M Craves, Ed Grass, Mrs A M Harrison, Mrs Laura July 10, (Jen. Geo. 0. Watts, Jefferson Davis 

V Hawkins, Miss Lillian Headley, James A Headley, Camp 25 00 

John T Hughes, Joseph D Hunt, D H James, Moses July 10, Con. Geo. 0. Watts, citizens and 

Kaufman, Theo Lewis, J L Logan, Joel c Lyle, J R Soldiers of Blue and Gray 64 00 

Morton, T W Moore, Thomas WMcCann, H B McClel- July 16, Pilcher Bros, ami W. H. Pilcher, 

Ian, Byron McClelland, Howard McCorkle, J H Nelms, proceeds of Pilcher concert, July K> 66 <m 

Rush Nelson, Watts Parker, J T Patterson, Wellington July 17. (has. D. Delerey, Army of Tenn. La. 

Payne, John S Phelps, Wickliffe Preston. II C Price, Div. fund created ' 102 50 

Edward Price, Mrs L C Price, L C Price, J W Pryor, July '_»_'. A. W. Hyatt, A. of T. La. Div 75 <m 



5 6 CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 

July 22, J. B. Levert, Vet. C. S. C I GO 00 SAMsnnn Sent to Judge W L Calhoun, $15.25. 

July 22, J. !'.. Levert, Sugar and Rice Ex S 50 gi itesville Througli J. P. Caldwell, four dollars 

July22, A. N. Block La Div. A. N Va 9 05 WAYNESV.LLE-William Boggs, R II Dykers, G S 

Juy22 law-,,,, I.. Davis C.H.St. F 10 00 FerguRon j E Hall ,,,, mk llalL A ., Reeve8 ,„.., „ 

.lulv 22, Jos. Deraoruelle, ( . II. St. I 6 50 «» 

July-. B. F Eschelman.C. Wa. Art 150 10 CAROHNA 

July 22, Alden McClellan, La. Div. Army of so ' '" CAROLINA. 

Tenn 7'J «»> Camden II G Carrison, I C Clyburn, J G Hay, A 

Aug. 17. Octave Fontenot, La. Div. Armv of " Kennedy, I' T Nuepigue, W M Shannon, Springs, 

Tenn. at Opelousas • t 11 <ki Heath & Co, .1 B Steedman, •?•"> each; Chronicle, 1 M 

in. Paul Conrad, C. H.St. Paul 221 50 Lemp,$3each; B B Clarke, A A Moore, $2 each ; G S 

Oct. -2~, Oliver Norinand, R. 1.. Gibson Camp Higgins, Cash. 

a, i,l Ladies of Evergreen 75 45 The above were collections by Dr. John W.Corbett, 

1892. and sent t<> the Charleston News and Courier. He re- 
Jan. 8, Judge !■'. A. Monroe, members Bar, ports about $110 raised at a concert given by the ladies 

Bench and Officers C. D. Courts :;in (ki and sent to the News and Courier. 

Jan. 15, II. McMillan, C. Wash. Art 17 50 

Feb. 1", John T. Block, Army of N. Va. La. TENNESSEE. 

Div., collected by J. M. Wilson.. •_'■_' 00 Arams Station -M L Johnston. 

April 13, , J. Lyons, citizens of New Orleans... 33 00 A lamo-W H Biggs, J B Fleming, C A G Ibar, 

Oct 11, Nicholson & Co, sundry collections } ,. Humphreys 82 fp B Nance, W II Poindexter, T 

of N. O. P^ayune.. ...... 78 50 x gkelton * ., ,-, Wi1i , 1ku „. 

Oct. 11, Nicholson & Co, subscription oi tin- „ ' ... „ _. A ,, _ ., , 

\ o Picayune UK) (H) Bells Station— Wm I. Bate, Capt. Dawson, BS 

Nov. 18, .1. W. Fairfax, sundry collections of McLemore, .1 C \\ Num., .1 II Thomas, 1) II Thomas. 

Daily City Item 50 50 Bolivar— P W Austin, \\ T Anderson, C H Ander- 

Less disbursements to date as per vouchors son, Ophelia P Bills, L M Carrington, W C Dorion, D 

on file . 17 75 E Durrett, It E Durrett, W W Farley, -I L Foote, C S 

Ganden, II P Joyner, Kahn Bros, Austin Miller, T E 

$'2,(iC»s 70 Moore, A T McNeal, -I -I Neely, Jr., M N Perry, .1 (' 

Oct. 10, remitted to J. S. Ellett, Savage, II W Tate, Julia M Qpshaw, Hugh Williams, 

treasurer, Richmond, Va $2,018 20 RB Wood, By oversight the amounts were not put 

Nov. 22 remitted to J. S. Ellett to the Bolivar list that exceeded $1. The collection 

treasurer, Richmond, Va 50 50— 2,068 70 there is $123 nof yet forwarded. 

Brownsville— Judge John Bond. 

New Orleans— Mrs. May Poitevant, $5. Cairo— W -I Lambert. 

MISSISSIPPI. Castalian Springs — Geo Harsh. 

Fayette— James Archer, F Braws,Thos Davenport, Chattanooga— G Andrews, Jr., N G Atkins, Creed 

W L Faulk. II McGladery, T .1 Key, W W McAa, A f Bates, W M Bearden, P I- Craig, \\ 1! Crabtree, I) 

K McNair, WK Penny, W L Stephen, J .1 Whitney. ^ clem, |>, L Couldmg, ^ . . I! h,u,,d \\ 1 Plumb, 

,. X ', •,.,., , J 1 Sneac , . F Ship,,. T E \ an \ alkenburg, L G 

Holly Springs — Jas I Fant. ,,• ,, M 

\\ alker. 

Ocean Springs -Mrs A A Staples. ,, . ,, ,, ,, ,• , ,•.,, ,,- ,, , 

1 Clarksville — Arthur II Munlord; little Miss Buck- 

IJn, knky— Geo Hicklcr. nerj five ( i ]] ars . 

Vicksburg— The Vicksburg C. V. Camp, through Covington— R R Green fund, $54.35. 

Col. D. A. Campbell, $409.55. ,, r „, c , 

1 Crockett — -I I stamps. 

MISSOURI. Fayetteville— J P Buchanan, .1 L Buchanan, W 

Harrisonville— Jeff Burford, seventy-five dollars. H Calhoun, A .1 Carloss, N 1' Carter, James Cashion, 

H R Estes $2.50. W R Cashion, Andrew Cashion, W II Cashion, A 

....... ri7T , c _ v Cashion, II B Douglass, H C Dwiggins, $5 ; J C Dcmer, 

ish.u .)kk.ski. A u K ,i ln , ,„,,„„, g \ V Fi em i n „ H ug h Francis, J C 

Hoboken— James Coltart, $5; Miss Virginia M Col- Goodrich, Theo Harris, Jr, E J Higgins,H K Holman, 

tart, Harriet Monk, John Stansfield. T c Little, I! K Locker, C A McDaniel, W C Morgan, 

NEW MEXICO •' " I,;il ' ks < w c Parks > •' n Pitts > (; F 1>itts ' (; F Ren " 

egar, H T Boach, Robertson & Goodrich, J W Scott, 

Silver City -C A Thompson. .1 \ V Smith, 11 1) Smith, A E Smith, .1 M' Stewart, O 

NORTH CAROLINA. C Tallant, E S Terry, Thomas Thomison, W P Tolley, 

_ T . , ,. ' . ,, , ,, It I) Warren. II C Dwii^gins' address is I'etershurg. 

Asheville Mrs EJ Aston, Mrs II A Gudger, Mrs ., T ,. ,, , „ ,, ,, ,f n 

.1 A Hucler,$2 each; Mrs D Johnston, Mrs Theo D Frjendship-J M Cochran, B II Harman, D B 

Johnston, Mrs H M Lee, C II Miller, Mrs M Penland, " lson - 

Miss Mary Penland, Mrs E L Rankin, R R Rawls, Gallatin— .las W Blackmore, David F Harry, C S 

HenryRedwood,MissMaggieSmith,MissAnnaSmith, Douglass, WC Dismukes, J B Harrison, .las . I Turner, 

Miss Louise Smith, Bessie Smith, Mann Smith. Geo E Seay, .1 A Trousdale, S F Wilson. 

Charlotte— Through the Observer, $29.50. Grand Junction— W C Mauldrin. 

Jackson— Emma W Burgwyn.J A Burgwyn,Geo P Hartsville— John D Stalker. 

Burgwyn, J B McRae, R B Peebles. Jackson— E L Bullock, $5. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



57 



Johnson's Grove — J R Worrell. 

Lewisburg— Through Capt.W. G. Loyd, $No. 

Maury City — Sid Avery, W H Carter, Dr B Moore, 
C Peal, Bryant Stallings. 

McKenzie— Through , $103.20. 

McMinnville — J W Irwin. 

Monroe — Dr J M Shelton. 

Nashville — Jos W Allen, Mrs J W Allen, B B 
Allen, Kate M Allen, Lieut Samuel M Allen. Mrs B B 
Allen, Walter Aiken, STC Doak, A .1 Grigsby, W C 
Kelvington, -10; John .1 Yertrees, Rev W R L Smith 

Red Lick — Jos Kling. 

Sweetwater — T T Hagar. 

Vicksbubg.— Through Col. D. A. Campbell, $409. 

Waveri.y — H C Carter. 

TEXAS. 

Boz— B F Forrester. 

Brownwood — G II Adams, J L Harris. F W Hender- 
son, C C Jones, J B Smith, E R Stanley, Ed T Smith. 

Coleman — J B Coleman, L E Collins, C L Coleman, 
Pilham Coleman, W C Dibrell, 5. 

Corpus Christi — M C Spann, collection, $177. 75. 

Fort Worth— Through Mrs. B. B. Pollard, $101.70. 

Waxahachie — A J Baxter. John P Cooper, E Chas- 
ka, Joe P Cooper, G II Cunningham, Miss Meta Coop- 
er, $11; J A Darrow, Dr W E Parmer, B F Forrester, 
J A (fray. B II Lattimer, M W McMight, L II Peters, 
Wm Stiles, T F. Thompson, M B Templeton. 

, Mrs S R Coggin,$7. 

VIRGINIA. 

Abingdon — Virgie M Gildersleeve (now Mrs. Taylor). 
Birmingham— D Walker. 
Brenner Bluff — W II Holman 
Bybee— R S White. 

Charlottesville — M Duke, George Perkins. 
Culpeppeb — 1> A Grundy. 

Palmyra— M P Pettit, Pembroke Pettit, William 
Schlater, ? Shepard, G M Winn. 

SCOTTSVTLLE — D W Anderson. 
Union Mills— Dr. Dudley R Boston. 
Wilmington — John W Adams. 



SOME WHO HAVE HELPED THE FUND. 

A good many halves and quarters come from Pratt 
Mines, Ala. 

Miss Jennie Smith, of Blaekshear, Ga., sends ?4, 
with as many names. 

M. B. Burgwin, Jackson, N. ('..sends $4 with the 
names of four friends. 

Bright little Miss Louise Beverly Sprague, of Mobile, 
sends nine names with $1 each. 

James Rutherford, of Batesville, Ark., sends in 
twenty-six names with $1 each. 

Miss Mollie Cunningham, of Waxahatehie. Texas. 
sends three names with $1 each. 

J. T. Cornell, of Cairo, Tenn., furnishes twenty- 
eight names with $28 to the fund. 

Maj. John J. Reeve, sends from Henderson, Ky., ten 
names, including his own, with $10. 



.Tame- Coltart, of Hoboken, N. J., sends a contribu- 
tion of $5 with three other names of $1 each. 

W. L. Stephens. Fayette, Miss., semis a batch of 
names, nearly all for $1 each. Money forwarded to 
Richmond. 

Mrs. C. P. Morrow, of Chouteau, 1. T.. sends ten 
names with as many dollars, including V. Gray, who 
puts $2 to her list. 

James W. Blackmore, of Gallatin, Tenn., thirteen 
names with as many dollars, which he "gathered up" 
among his friends. 

A splendid list will he seen from B. F. Jenkins, 
President of the Davis Monument Association, Mans- 
field, La., which aggregates $107. 

Mi-s Meta Cooper, of Waxahatehie, Texas, sends a 
neat little note witli ten subscriptions to the Monu- 
ment, of *1 each, except that of Joel Cooper, which is 
for $'_». 

Mrs. R. V. Porter, of Greenville, Ala., on being ap- 
plied to, felt discouraged with the prospect, hut when 
a subscription hook was sent her. she procured thirty 
names, with 1 

Maj. J B. BriggS, of the John W.Caldwell Cam]), 
Russellville. Ky., sends $28, including $5 for himself, 
and a similar ' amount for the gentleman in whose 
honor the i amp is named. 

Elsewhere reference is made to the Young Men's 

Dei sratic Club of Nashville, whose fund is the 

largest that has ever heen secured hy any one organ- 
ization, and to other workers for the cause. 

R W. Downer sends $24 from the little old vi! 

of Fairview, Ky., where Jefferson Davis was horn. It 
all the other places would do as well in proportion, I 

South would have a Memorial Temple sec ond to none 
other on earth. 

In the contribution of Joseph W. Allen, of Nash- 
ville, the list includes the name of his son. Lieut. 
Samuel M. Allen, c. s. A., killed hy bushwhackers 
while on furlough at a friend's house near Memphis, 
Tenn., March. 1864. 

In a remittance of fifteen dollars. January 2d, from 
Otis S. Tarver, of tie .lor Finnegan Camp, Sanford, 
Florida. I notice contributions from three little dar- 
lings, three, tour, and six years. The name- are Linda 
C. Barnes, F. F. Barnes, and Hannah Myerson. 

Dr. .1. P. Cannon, of McKenzie, Tenn., writes of the 
fund : " 1 see you ask for the names of contributors to 
the Monument Fund. I can not give the names ot 
those who contributed the $103 from this place, a- it 
was raised principally by Stonewall Jackson Bivouac 
in different ways, assisted hy the citizens of the com- 
munity.'' 

W. i\ Renwick, of Monroe, La., writes of the col- 
lection of $64, which has been forwarded to Rich- 
mond. He adds: "Theresa prevailing notion that 
it is the duty of the Southern people to build a suita- 
ble memorial to the Confederacy through its Presi- 
dent. Davis, and a well organized movement will surely 
succeed." 

Fli Perkins, on being introduced to the agent of the 
Davis Monument Fund, made the generous offer to 
deliver a lecture for the benefit of the fund at any 
time and any place, and added, "Think of that man's 
integrity ami what he did with the resources at hand. 
He was an American." This genial humorist and lec- 
turer is a Union Veteran. 



5» 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



The fund aggregating nearly $1,800 raised by the 
Young Men's Democrati Club, of Nashville, is the 
largest yel furnished by any single organization. 

Col. John George Ryan send- from Chicago five dol- 
lar subscriptions, one of which was in the name of his 
brother. Gen. \V. A. C. Ryan, of the United States 
Army. " who was .me of those token from the steamer 
Virginius, and murdered at Santiago del Cuba, Nov. 
1. l v 7">;" and another for their mother, deceased, 
who was an admirer of Southern chivalry. 

J. I.. Buford, "f Birmingham, Ala., who was a mem- 
ber of the Clayton Guards, First Alabama Regiment, 
did this clever thing in connection with tin 1 Monu- 
ment Fund: He subscribed $10 for himself and nine 
others. One of the contribution books was sent him 
to insert their names, which he forwarded to his sister 
Miss Annie E. Buford, of Union Springs, Ala., and 
-he secured twenty names, with $1 each. 

•I. W. Simmons, of Mexia, Tex., reports the follow- 
ing contributions for SI each: W. H. Williams, C. L. 
Watson. .1. W. Simmons, II. W.Gray, -I. M. Rombo, 
Joe Wilder. II. A. Boyd, F. H. McCoy, Bennett Hunt 
and Mrs. I). A. Murphy, of Mexia,' and Capt. T. B. 
Tyers, of Groesbeck, and adds: "I will send a large 
list after the concert." Preparations are being made 
for an entertainment there the '27th inst. for the pro- 
motion of the fund. 



ANNUAL ADDRESS TO VETERANS. 



Gen. E. D. Hall, chairman of United Confederate 
Veterans Committee for North Carolina, furnishes the 
following: 

"Wilmington, N. ('., January 19, 1893. 

"At a meeting of the committee (a quorum being 
present) appointed to raise funds for the State of North 
Carolina for the Jefferson Davis Monument, held at 
Raleigh, January 13th, it was agreed to name one suit- 
able person in each congressional district, whose duty 
it shall he to recommend four persons, two males anil 
two females, from each county in their district, for the 
purpose of assisting in raising North Carolina's share 
of the funds necessary to erect the said monument at 
Richmond, Va. 

"It was further ordered that a circular letter should 
he issued to the parties named by the chairman, Gen, 
Hall, containing instructions, and they are requested 
to answer as soon as possible, stating whether they 
will serve. 

"The persons named from the districts are as fol- 
lows: First— Hon. W. A. B. Branch, Washington; 
Second — Hon. Matthew Manley, Newbern; Third- 
Col. W. J. Green, Fayetteville; Fourth— Gen. W. R. 
Cox, Raleigh; Fifth — (Jen. James I). Glenn, Greens- 
boro; Sixth — Col. H. C. Jones, Charlotte; Seventh — 
('apt. J. G. Hall, Hickory: Eighth— Col. W. II. H. 
Cowles, Wilkesboro; Ninth— Gen. R. B. Vance, Ashe- 
ville." 

In concluding his appeal, (ien. Hall says: 

"To the ladies and gentlemen of the committee, on 
you depends North Carolina's credit in this matter. 
Let all work faithfully. 

"To the ladies we mainly look for success. By en- 
tertainments of various kinds much can be accom- 
plished. To the men, hard work, soliciting subscrip- 
tions, argument and persuasion. 

"As soon as a reasonable amount of funds is col- 
lected, remit the same to the chairman, E. D. Hall, 
Wilmington, N. C, by postoffice order or otherwise." 



( i <m. W. I,. Cabell issues a circular. Dallas. Texas, 
February '2. 1893, as the Commander of the Trans- 
Mississippi Department of United Confederate Vet- 
erans, in which he says: "It is with feedings of the 
greatest pleasure, as well as pride, that I can greet you 
at the end of another year ami say that a kind Provi- 
dence has extended its shelteli ng w i Dg6 over our no- 
ble Association, and that it is growing stronger and 
stronger each year. Our old comrades are becoming 
more familiar with and more and more interested in 
the objects of our benevolent, social, and historical 
Associat ion, and are increasing the number of Camps 
in every section. The death roll has not been as great 
as we might have expected. The dead have oeen 
properly cared for, and the living Confederate veter- 
ans who are incapacitated, by sickness or wounds, 
from making a living, have been provided for by the 
different States in this department. They have good 
houses, are amply provided with food, raiment, and 
shelter, where they can spend the evening of their 
lives in quiet and peace as the honored guests of the 
great States of Texas, Arkansas, Missouri, and the 
Territory. I therefore urge upon you, my old com- 
rades, to press forward the good work; that vou will 
organize and join at once the Association of United 
Confederate Veterans." . . . He urges a large at- 
tendance at Birmingham July 19 and 20, and adds: 
"A committee on transportation for this department 
has been formed, and will do all within their power 
to secure reduced rates on railroads leading to Bir- 
mingham. Local committees can communicate with 
this committee. 

"I would also call your attention to the fact that 
every Camp, not only in this department but in the 
department of the Fast, has been called upon to con- 
tribute to the erection of a monument to our great 
chieftain, Jefferson Davis. . . . Let us, then, put 
our shoulders to the wheel and see to it that this mon- 
ument is erected at once, so that all those now living 
who followed the flag of the Lost Cause may be pres- 
ent at the unveiling of the monument to be erected 
in Richmond, Va." 

Col. Wm. L. Thompson, Adjutant General and Chief 
of Staff to Trans-Mississippi Department, United Con- 
federate Veterans: "The Coneedeijate Veteran is 
before me, and 1 am greatly pleased with its contents, 
ami wish you all success. Please send five copies for 
this department. 

In this issue of the Confederate Vetekan there is 
an article upon the manufacture of steed in the South, 
as set forth by a letter from Hon. Abram S. Hewett, of 
New York. It is an able paper, and treats of an in- 
dustry which, if successful, will tend largely to en- 
riching the land we love. Col. A. M. Shook, who be- 
gun at the bottom after getting out of his Confederate 
suit in 1865, and is a leading spirit in the business, re- 
ports prospects for the success which has been antici- 
pated as good, although the inventions are not yet 
demonstrated to perfect satisfaction. 



W. A. Gillespie, Greenwood, Miss.: "Your circular 

just received. I am glad to know that such a publica- 
tion is in existence. Think I can raise a good club of 
subscribers. I inclose fifty cents for sample copy." 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



59 



THE TENNESSEE CONFEDERATE HOME. 



CONFEDERATE MOM' M ENTS. 



IT COMPRISES THE GREATER PART OF THE HERMITAGE 

—ANDREW JACKSON'S SOME— TEN MILES 

FROM NASHVILLE. 



There is no State in which greater zeal lias been ex- 
ercised for a soldiers' home, perhaps, than by friends 
in Tennessee. This is saying much in the freshness 
of what is being done now in Missouri, and what was 
done recently in Georgia. It is saying all the more 
in considering Louisiana and other States, in which 
our people have honored themselves in this respect. 

The Hermitage property, owned by the State for 
many years, has all been turned over to a board of 
trustees, except twenty-live acres, including the resi- 
dence, which has been given into the custody of the 
Ladies' Hermitage Association. 

The farm contains four hundred and seventy-live 
acres, enclosed by eight and one-half miles of wire 
fence with cedar posts. Many acres of the land was 
poor and washed, but lias been admirably reclaimed 
from underbrush and thicket and set in clover. Light 
acres are also set apart for the garden. There are upon 
the premises three fine wells and an inexhaustible 
spring of pure water, which furnishes the supply for 
the tank in the main building, a distance of thirty- 
three hundred feet. 

The main building is a handsome two-Story -tinc- 
ture, of brick, with stone foundation, and suitable 
trimmings. The central front of the building has an 
inscription in raised letters, "The Confederate Sol- 
diers' Home." The front of both wings is adorned 
with galleries and rounded portico, sustained by neat 
fluted pillars. The interior arrangements are excel- 
lent and equipped with all modern improvements. 
In the cellar there is a well constructed furnace, with 
a self-regulating boiler, and distributing pipes to all 
parts of the building, carrying both heat anil hot water. 
From the enormous tank on top of the building, hold- 
ing when full ten thousand gallons, water is supplied 
to all portions of it. In the upper and lower corridors 
there are attachments for hose Bufficienl in length to 
be used against tire. 

Of the many contributions to the Home, the most 
liberal gift was the dining room furniture, including 
a handsome sideboard, which was presented by the 
family of the late Charles Nelson, a German-born citi- 
zen of Nashville and a Union soldier. The firm of 
Phillips, Hood A" Co. gave a range worth one hundred 
and fifty dollars; Mrs. 0. M. Spofford contributed one 
hundred dollars, and many others fifty dollars and less. 
All the rooms were furnished by individual donations. 

The executive committeemen — Mai. M. S. Cockrill, 
Dr. W. .1. McMurray. and Maj. K. II. Dudley— who 
were selected by the trustees to take charge of all the 
work, deserve high praise for their zeal at all times for 
the Home. 

It would take a long chapter to enumerate in briel 
the wholesome supply of everything that has been 
furnished. It would gratify everybody who feels solic- 
itude for the disabled soldier who shares its benefits. 



The January edition of the Confederate: Veteran 
was so short of meeting the demand, and as a history 
of Confederate monuments, complete as possible, is 
determined upon, some of the following statistics is 
a repetition of what was published before. 

The same is true in regard to those "who have 
worked for the monument." It is an honor list, and 
deserves the knowledge and the gratitude of all other 
patriots. The monument history will amaze the civ- 
ilized world. With all the poverty and depression 
that followed the fatal results of the war, the hun- 
dreds and hundreds of thousands of dollars so ex- 
pended, when computed, will be a dazzling record of 
patriotism and affection for the heroes who rushed 
into the jaws of death. Let every community see 
that what they have done to honor our dead be com- 
municated for publication in the Confederate Vet- 
eran. It will be a feature, ere long, to compile a list 
of memorials in different States and report tabulated 
statements in the aggregate. 

1 see that you do not mention the monument erected 
at Georgetown, Kw. to the memory of the Confederate 

dead. These soldiers were buried in different parts of 
the county when Gen. Kirby Smith's army was in 
Kentucky in 1862. After the war their remains were 
gathered up and buried in a separate lot in our beau- 
tiful cemetery, and the ladies of the county raised 
money by <>», doUa Uions and erected a monu- 

ment at a cost of one thousand dollars. You will ob- 
serve that all but two of these soldiers were strangers 
in this county and State, only two being Kentuckians. 
I give the names inscribed upon the monument, think- 
ing perhaps they may meet the eye of pome one who 
knows not of their resting place: William Simons, 
Arkansas: W. Hall. Georgia; J. -1. Hensly, Georgia; 
William Sutton. Georgia; Capt. John Black, Texas: 
William Tanehill. Texas; Bryan Pitzpatrick, Texas; 
W. T. Coppage, Kentucky; William Wood. South 
Carolina; Richard Dumford, Arkansas; Wallace Ox- 
ford, Texas; Archer Shrout, Texas; William Steele, 
Georgia; William T. Ford. North Carolina: Cardwell 

Jones, Georgia; Gunsaule, Kentucky: Unknown; 

W. G. Wooten. Hodgenville, Ky. These two last 
named were shot to death by order of Burbridge, the 
"unknown" refusing to give his name, saying that he 
did not wish his mother to know that lie had died 
such a death. The monument is twenty feet high: 
shaft, eleven feet. On the base, in front, is the Con- 
federate cross, with drooping banner ami broken staff: 
emblems of war lie under tin- fold of the banner. -On 
the shaft are raised cannons in bronze, securely inlaid 
and fastened to the granite. On each side of the mon- 
ument are inscribed the names of the boys in gray 
who sleep in a circle at the base. At the bottom of 
the inscription in front are the words, " 1861 — Confed- 
erate Soldier — 1865." Wishing you success, both in 
your paper and the monument for Mr. Davis, 

I am yours truly, A. II. SINCLAIR. 

Monuments in New Orleans.— The Confederate 
Monument in Greenwood Cemetery, built by tin- La- 
dies' Benevolent Association, is of white marble, sur- 
mounted by a figure of a ( lonfederate infantryman " on 
guard." Around the pedestal are the busts of Lee, 
Sidney Johnston, Polk and " Stonewall." It was un- 
veiled' in 1867. Value, $25,000. 



6o 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



Monument of Washington Artillery.- Marble 
shaft on mound, statue of an artilleryman on top, 
sponge staff in band. <iu the base are inscribed the 
names of thus.' members of the command who were 
killed nr « I i « - < 1 in service, also the names of sixty en- 
gagements in whirh the command participated. Un- 
veiled Feb. 22, 1880. Value, 115,000. 

Monument of the Army oi Wesi Virginia. — A 
column 50 feel above the ground, or 38 feet above the 
mournl on which it stands. On the summit is a stone 
Btatue of Stonewall Jackson, 8 feel 9 inches high. 
Under the mound are vaults for the dead Jefferson 
Davis' remains are deposited then' at present. Un- 
veiled May. 1881. Value, $25,000. 

Monument of Army of Tennessee.— Mound con- 
taining tombs for deceased members, surmounted by 
equestrian statue of Albert Sidney Johnston in bronze. 

At the entrance to vaults is a marble life-size figure of 
a Cnn federate sergeant calling his roll. Value $35,000. 
Robert E. Lee Moni ment. — A Doric column of 
granite on a grassy mound, surmounted by bronze 
statue of Lee L5 feet high. Entire height, 106 feet 8 
inches. Column, 60 feet. Unveiled Feb. 22 1884. 
It is in St. Charles street. Value, $40,000. 



Natchez, Miss.: "We have built a very handsome 
monument to our Confederate dead costing $3,000. Jt 

is a shaft with life-size soldier in marble. Statue 
made in Italy." 

The Confederate Monument at Camden, S. C. — 
Dr. John W. Corbett supplies the following data: 
"The Ladies' Monumental Association was organized 
in 1872, with Mrs. 11. I). DeSaussure for the first Pres- 
ident. The next President was Miss C. M. Boykin. 
At the time of the unveiling of the monument the 
association had the following officers: Mrs. A. E. 
Doby, President; Mrs. .lames Davis. First Vice Presi- 
dent; Miss Emma Reynolds, Second Vice President; 
Mrs. J. D. Kennedy, Secretary; Mrs. J. W. McCurry, 
Treasurer, and Mrs. Herman Baum, chairman of the 
Executive Committee. The corner-stone of this mon- 
ument was laid on the loth of May, 1883, Memorial 
Day, and it was completed in June." The celebration 
was a great event for Camden. The railway yard was 
crowded with coaches and engines. Crowds went in 
private conveyances from all portions of the county 
and neighboring counties. The procession contained, 
besides the civic lodges, four hands of music, sixteen 
infantry companies, three cavalry companies and three 
artillery corps, in all about seven hundred men in uni- 
form. The stand near the monument was richly and 
profusely decorated with festoons of palmetto ieaves 
and jessamines, and almost completely covering the 
stand was a great number of battle-scarred Hags. (Jen. 
Wade Hampton was the orator of the day: Gen. M. I '. 
Butler, Gov. Hugh S Thompson, Gen. J. D. Kenne.lv, 
Adjt. Cen. Manigault, Col. E. M. Boykin, Rev. S. H. 
Hay, and a few others were on the stand. The mon- 
ument is a cylindrical shaft of marble, four feet in cir- 
cumference and eight feet high, on a marble base; un- 
der this base are three large blocks of Fairfield granite; 
surmounting the shaft is an urn, on which is a dove; 
the (love has its wings outstretched and is facing the 
south; the total height of the monument is twenty 
feet. The square base to shaft is inscribed as follows: 
On the north, two swords crossed, with '1861' on one 
side and ' 1883' on the other side of the cross; on the 



south, a laurel wreath, enclosing the letters •('. S. A.': 

on the west, 'This union t is erected by the women 

of Kershaw county, in memory of her brave sons who 
fell during the Confederate War. defending the rights 
and honor of the South : ' mi the east, ' They died for 

1 ie and country, and are gratefully remembered 

wherever they be. 

" OoiluUesa hearts have conned their story ; 

Countless hearts grown brave thereby; 

Let (is thank the God of glory. 
We had such to die." ' 

This monument is situated at an important street 

crossing. An iron fence encloses it." 

Confederate Monuments in South Carolina. — 
Concerning Confederate monuments in South Caro- 
lina, Win. E. Breese, President First National Bank, 
Asheville, North Carolina, writes: "I notice that you 
omit South Carolina so far from your list of memo- 
rial monuments. I know no State so full of them, 
and none as fine, except in Richmond. In Charles- 
ton the Washington Light Infantry have erected two, 
one $8,000, the other $13,000; Irish Volunteers, one 
for$15,(KK'); Charleston Fight Dragoons, $14,000; Ger- 
man Artillery. 820,tK)(); Ladies' Memorial Association, 
$25,000; one to John Mitchell, the Irish patriot, $5,- 
000; S. II. Anderson (Fighting Dick). $2,000; Gen. 
Ripley, $2,000. The old Citadel Academy and all Un- 
churches have on walls and vestibules memorial tab- 
lets. Columbia has one, Camden, Cheraw, (ireenville, 
Anderson, etc. I write only from memory, being a 
former South Carolinian. I have always thought that 
South Carolina headed the list. The Richmond mon- 
uments were from contributions all over the South. 
The South Carolina monuments are all home affairs." 

Newberry, S. C. : "The ladies have erected a mon- 
ument to the Confederate dead from this county in 
the court house square. It is of marble, and costs 
$1,300." 

Anderson, S. C: "Our noble women have organ- 
ized a Confederate Memorial Association, and are now 
raising funds to erect a monument in our city." 



Monument at Knoxville. — It is a graceful, well- 
proportioned shaft, twelve feet square at the base 
and twenty-four feet high. It is surmounted with a 
heroic statue of a private soldier, standing at parade 
rest. The inscription "Commemorates the heroic 
courage and unshaken constancy of more than 1,600 
soldiers of the South, who, in the great war between 
the States, 1861 to 1865, were inspired by the holiness 
of a patriotic and impersonal love, and in the 
mountain passes of Tennessee, whether stricken in 
the field or in hospital ward, gave ungrudgingly their 
lives to their country." The monument is of Ten- 
nessee gray marble, and is extremely handsome for 
the cost, SI, ")00. The unveiling was last Memorial 
day. May 19. Tho general address was by Senator W. 
B. Bate. ex-Union soldiers co-operated in making the 
event a success. The daily press, Republican and 
Democratic, gave very eulogistic accounts of the event. 
Many gentlemen were helpful to the ladies in their 
work, one of whom was Col. F. A. Moses, a member 
of the Davis Monument Committee for Tennessee. 

Monument for Clarksvtlle. — It is in process of 
erection, is to be 48 feet high, 9 feet by 13 feet at 
base; will be capped by a bronze statue 9 feet high. 
There will be two granife statues 7 feet high, 12 feet 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



61 



above the base. The monument is being constructed 
from Barre granite. It is to cost 17,500, and to be 
completed in the early spring, and to be dedicated in 
May. 

The Confederate monument in the grassy court- 
house yard at Bolivar, Tenn., is very beautiful. It cobI 
$2,700, is of marble, about thirty feel high from 
ground to top, urn on top, shaft draped with Bag. 
The ornaments are cannon, tents, drums, flags, etc 
Inscription on south side. " To the Confederate dead 
of Hardeman County;" west, "Hardeman County 
erects this monument to the memory of her sons fallen 
in the service of the Confederate States;" east, "In 
hope of a joyful resurrection;" north, 

"Though men deserve, 

They may not win success. 
The brave will honor the bi 

\ anqulshed none i he less." 

A movement was started for a Confederate monu- 
mental Fayetteville, Tenn., but it was abandoned on 

account of a disastrous cyclone which swept the tow u. 

Jackson, Tenn., has elected a tall shaft 70 feet high, 
including the figure of a Confederate soldier at parade 
rest. It is in the court-house yard. 

The people of Tipton Co. Tenn.. arc raising funds for 
county monument, and have contributed more than 
$50 to the Davis monument. 



The ex-Confederate Association of < l-rayson County, 
Texas, are preparing to ereel on the public square at 
Sherman, a 82,500 monument to the memory of ex- 
Confederate soldiers. 



Monuments in Ri< hmond. Monument to 12,000 
Confederate dead in Hollywood Cemetery, a granite 
pyramid 4"> feet square and '.mi feet high, elected by 
the ladies of the Hollywood Memorial Association at 
a cost of about $50,000, now almosl covered by thai 
beautiful evergreen vine, the Virginia creeper. 

Monuments over the grave of Gen. J. E. P>. Stqart, 
in Hollywood Cemetery, to the dead of Pickett's Di- 
vision and the dead of Otey Battery both on Gettys- 
burg Hill in Hollywood— and to the Richmond How- 
itzers, on Howitzer Place, just west ol Monroe Park, 
represent an outlay of approximately $10,000. 

The greatest monument to a Confederate that has 
ever been erected, size and quality of material con- 
sidered, is the Lee monument in Richmond. In the 
reference to it elsewhere no idea of its magnitude can 
be had except that it cost $75,000. A more accurate 
description may be expected hereafter. 

Monument to the Private Soldiers and Sailors of the 
Confederacy, in Marshall Park, overlooking the site of 
Libby Prison, a copy of Pompey's Pillar, surmounted 
by a heroic bronze figure of the Confederate Infantry- 
man, erected by private subscriptions at a cost of 
about $50,000. 

Heroic Statue, in bronze, of Gen. T. J. .lackson, by 
Foley, presented by admiring Englishmen to the peo- 
ple of Virginia, erected in Capitol Square on a granite 
base, at the expense of the State. Aggregate cost, 
about $15,000. 

Bronze Equestrian Statue of Gen. R. E. Pee, by 
Mei'cie, ornamental granite pedestal, from designs by 
Pujol, at the western extremity of Franklin St.. erected 
by private subscriptions at a cost of about $75,000. 



Bronze Heroic Statue of Gen. Wm. C. Wickham, 
by Valentine, provided by private subscription, and 
erected in Monroe Park on a granite base at the ex- 
pense of the city. Total cost, about $15,000. 

Bronze Heroic Statue of Lieut. Gen. A. P. Hill, by 
Sheppard, erected over Hill's remains on the Hermit- 
age Road just north of the city, by private subscrip- 
tions, at a cost of about $15,000. 

Monument to 17,000 Confederate dead in Oakwood 
Cemetery, a massive granite obelisk, erected by the 
ladies of the Oakwood Memorial Association, at 
of about $5,000. 

Movements are well advanced for an Equestrian 
Statue of Gen. .1. E. I>. Stuart, and a monument to 
Gen. John P. Cooke. 

Cemetery and Monument \t Fredericksburg.— 
Mrs. .1. X. Barney, who raised $5,100 for the Confeder- 
:it' cemetery, with which marble headstones replaced 
rotting wood, and a. creditable statue of a private sol- 
dier was placed in the center ; in telling of the work she 
said: "I received several shower baths of cold water 
throw n ..n me by doubting people, who said the South 
w as too busy trying to make a living to attend to put- 
ting headstones to its dead soldiers, but I did not 
mind a word they said. First. I put a box on my hall 
table for the babies to drop pennies in. It was tine 
fun for the servants to make the little fat hands un- 
told tor the pur]...-, Then the children brought me 
the tiv. rent pieces; boys and girls on their vvav to 
school would contribute their money to put tomb- 
Stones to the soldier- win. died to save their homes. 
•ceded in stirring my poor, little battle-scarred 
town until I secured $250 from voluntary contribu- 
tor-. Then I bran. In .1 oil' into all the States. Maj. 
Spurr, of Nashville, will tell you how 1 tormented his 
unfailing courtesy and patience. Simply by using my 
pen and bringing the matter to the hearts •■!' the dear 
Southern people, I raised $5,100, and you saw the re- 
sult." In conclusion, she said; "We must have that 
monument to Mr. Davis, and that shortly, while our 
generation lasts. It is due our Lost Cause that we 

should." 

Winchester. Ya.. has ere. ted a Slnixm monument to 
the unknown Confederate dead in Stonewall Cem- 
etery. In addition to this principal monument, dif- 
ferent States have erected shafts. There is one for 
Virginia that cost $1,000. Maryland lias a superb 
structure, capped with a statue of a private soldier, by 
O'Brien, that cost $2,500. The 1 statue was made on 
an order that failed and the work was procured at a 
small percentage of its value. 

Portsmouth, Va., has honored her soldier dead in a 
highly creditable way. It is in a monument that i ..-t 
about $9,000, is fifty-five feet high, and has a statue on 
each corner of the base. The -tallies represent the 
four branches of service — Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery, 
and Navy. 

A monument is being erected near Newport News. 
Va., to cost between one and two thousand dollars. It 
is the work of the Pee Camp of Confederate veterans 
and their friends at Hampton Va. 

Woodstock. Va.: Subscriptions have been made 
in this county for the Lee monument at Richmond, 
Jackson, Lexington ami elsewhere. 

Shepardstown, Va.: A Confederate monument has 
been erected at a est of $2,500. It is a marble shaft. 

Culpepper, Va., has a monument that cost $1,000. 



62 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



GENEROUS ACT OF JAY GOULD. 



GEN. JOSEPH WHEELER'S FAREWELL TO His MEN. 



It seeme seasonable still ami fitting to mention in 
tin- Confederal i Veteran a noble act of kindness to 
southern people by the late Mr. -lay Gould. Many 
harsh criticisms were published about him at the time 
of his death hecause he did precisely as most nun do 
in distributing his property between his children. 
While in Washington soon after his (hath 1 wrote for 
the Post of his generosity while the yellow fever was 
so severe at Memphis. It seems to have been so for- 
gotten that I copy the record as published at the time. 
An Associated Press message of September 1, 1879, 
said, "The Howard Association baving battled fortwo 
months with the dread destroyer, finds every dollar in 
the treasury exhausted, with several hundred sick and 
convalescent to be provided for." That telegram was 
seen by Mr. Gould that day at his luxurious home far 
away from danger, and here is the result: 

"New York, September •">. — To W. J. Smith, acting 
President Howard Association, Memphis, Tenn.: 1 
send you by telegraph &o,(.KHi to aid the Howard Asso- 
ciation. 1 am certain the generous people through- 
out the country will contribute liberally to aid your 
stricken city. At any rate, keep ox at your noble 
work and I WILL foot THE hill. What are your daily 
expenses? Answer. "Jay GOULD." 

Mr. Smith, in reply, said, "The grand sentiment 
you express, to continue our noble work and you will 
toot the bill, has nerved us all, and strengthened our 
faith in the cause in which we are engaged. Our ex- 
penses are about S I ,< K MJ per day." 

The above is published not in commendation of 
what the great financier did with his money, but as 
setting forth one of the boldest and most unstinted 
ads of charity on .record. It is well to remember the 
good that men do. 

DEATH OF A WIDELY-KKOWN SOUTHERN WOMAN. 



Mrs. Mary H. Robertson, who was greatly beloved 
by the multitude of Southern girls who attended 
Wards Seminary at Nashville, Tenn., all along after 
the war, will be saddened by her death. It occurred 
in January, after an illness of several menths. She 
had gone to Atlanta, and was with her sister, Mrs. 
Preston Miller, when the end came. The funeral was 
preached in the First Presbyterian Church, Nashville, 
on a bitter cold day, to a large congregation. The 



er 



discourse was by Rev. J. H. McNeilly, D. I). Aft 
reading from Psalm 71 he said: "We come to pa 
tribute of honor and of tears to the memory of a noble 
woman 'nobly planned,' whose life was one of the be- 
neficent forces of this community." The minister 
ably portrayed her leading characteristics. She was a 
woman of brilliant intellect and of wide culture. She 
had great kindness of heart; her sympathies were 
quick and her affections warm. She was a person of 
the strongest purpose. She had exquisite tact, ever 
ever possessing that innate, subtle sense of propriety 
whereby she did the proper thing in the proper way 
and at the right time. She was acutely conscientious, 
and her life was a blessing to all who came in contact 
with her. Days after the funeral there was a large 
gathering of prominent people to do honor to her 
memory. 



Mr. .1. (). Allen, who was with Gen. Wheeler, and 
was paroled at Charlotte. N. ('.. May:'.. L865, took a 
copy of his farewell address. It will be seen thai no 
place is given. The implied "headquarters in the 
saddle" may be substituted. 

" Headquarters Cavalry Corps, April 29, 1865. 

"Gallant Comrades — You have fought your last 
fight, your task is done, liming a four years' strug- 
gle for liberty you have exhibited courage, fortitude, 
devotion. You are the sole victors oi more than two 
hundred sternly contested fields. You have partiei- 
paticipated in more than a thousand conflicts of arms. 
You are heroes, veterans, and patriots. The bones of 
your comrades mark battle fields upon the soil of 
Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, North and South Car- 
olina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi. You have done 
all that human exertion could accomplish. In bidding 
you adieu 1 desire to tender thanks for your gallantry 
m battle, your fortitude under suffering, and your de- 
votion at all times to the holy cause you have done so 
much to maintain. I desire also to express my grati- 
tude for the kind feeling you have seen fit to extend 
toward myself, and to invoke upon you the blessing 
of our heavenly Father, to whom we must always look 
for support in the hour of distress. Brethren in the 
cause of freedom, comrades in arms, I bid you farewell. 
"(Signed) Joseph Wheeler, Maj. Gen. 

" W. F. Wails, Maj. and A. A. A. G." 



CONFEDERATE MONUNENT AT NASHVILLE, TENN. 



The cut on cover page of the Nashville monument 
is a good one. It is built of Vermont granite, and is 
forty-five feet six inches high. The first base is six- 
teen feet square; above it there are three gradations, 
then the tall shaft surmounted by a private soldier of 
collosal size. In bold letters on upper base are the 
words, "Confederate Memorial." It cost $10,500. The 
other inscriptions are as follows: 

Front — "This shaft honors the valor, devotion, and 
sacrifice unto death of Confederate soldiers of Tennes- 
see. The winds of heaven, kissing its sides, hymn an 
everlasting requium in memory of the unreturning 
brave." 

Rear — "Erected through the efforts of women of the 
State in admiration of the chivalry of men who fought 
in defense of home and fireside, and in their fall sealed 
a title of unfading affection." 

Right — "In the magnanimous judgment of man- 
kind, who gives up life under a sense of duty to a 
public deemed just is a hero." 

Left — "The muster roll of our dauntless dead is 
lost, and their dust dispersed on many fields. This 
column sentinels each soldier grave as a shrine. 



Confederate Bonds, Money and Postage Stamps. 
— A little friend, in Princeton, New Jersey, writes re- 
quest for Confederate postage stamps. It suggests a 
feature that would be very interesting as to the pres- 
ervation of Confederate treasures. Information as to 
who have bonds, currency, and postage stamps would 
be gratefully received. If any of our friends should 
be inclined to divide these valueless treasures grateful 
hands would receive them at this office. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



63 



AN ORDER THAT HOXORS THE AUTHOR. 



The fraternal sentiment expressed in his note by 
Gen. G. P. Thruston, who has resided in Tennessee 
since the war, in sending the subscription to the Con- 
federate Veteran, revives a memory that induces 
this record. He was Chief of Staff to Rosecrans at the 
time, and in order to protect the citizens as much as 
possible he issued the following order to Generals 
Philip H. Sheridan, .left'. (_'. Davis, and R. \V. John- 
son, commanding divisions: 

Headquarters 20th Army Corps, 
Winchester, Tenn., .Inly 11, 1863. 

General — Gen. McCook desires you to carry into 
execution in your command the instructions con- 
tained in the inclosed letter. While he appreciates 
the condition in whi< h your tmops have been placed, 
and the necessity of foraging upon the country for 
supplies, he wishes every effort made to maintain dis- 
cipline and protect private property from willful and 
needless depredations. 

The great majority of the people of this country 
are disloyal, and' he is willing to sec them deprived, 
in a proper manner, of whatever is essential i" the 
support and safety of the army, provided sufficient 
subsistence is left, in all cases, to supply the present 
necessity of families. 

Disloyalty does not forfeit the rights of humanity, 
which every true soldier will respect. 

All forage, provisions, and animals required for the 
use of the army must be taken and receipted for by 
Regimental, Brigade, and Division Quartermasters. 

All officers are authorized and directed to ;irrest 
thieves, pillagers, and stragglers. 

I am. General, very respectfully your obedient serv- 
ant. (Signed) G. P. Thruston, 

A. A. G. ami Chief of Stall. 



THE CONFEDERATE HOME IN FLORIDA. 



The Confederate Association of Florida lias pur- 
chased the Italian villa known as the Whitney home- 
Stead, two miles below Jacksonville on the beautiful 
St. John's River. The tract contains ten acres of 
land, with orange and other fruit trees. On the river 
front will he placed a commodious hath house, and 
boats, etc, tor fishing, there being no better lishing 
grounds in the State than immediately in this vicin- 
ity. As soon as the improvements have been added 
it will he ready for occupancy, and the old veterans of 
Florida will have a home they may he proud of. It 
is planned to have the formal opening at the time of 
the reunion of the Florida Department United Con- 
federate Veterans, March Kith. 



Reunion ok United Confederate Veterans in 

FLORIDA. — Mr. W. D. Matthews, of Jacksonville, writes 
in good spirit of the next reunion of the Florida De- 
partment of United Confederate Veterans, which is to 
occur March Kith. Committees have been appointed, 
and they expect to realize a greater success than they 
did at the last one held in June, and it was "a sur- 
prising success." He adds, " We expect a number of 
people of national reputation to make addresses. We 
have other attractions that will draw crowds from ad- 
joining States.'' 



Death of Gen. Forrest's Wipe. — The lovely wife 
of Gen. N. Bedford Forrest died January 22d in Mem- 
phis, where she had resided many years. She was 
Miss Mary Ann Montgomery, ami was married Sep- 
tember 25, 1855. After the General's .death she de- 
voted herself to the rearing of three grandchildren, 
Mary. Bedford, and William, children of her only son, 
whose mother died when they were quite small. Mrs. 
Forrest was a cultured Christian lady, and was de- 
votee! to the cause in which her husband was not only 
a hero, but a wonderful man. He was as a whirlwind 
in combatting the toe. 



The two first visitors to the Veteran sanctum for 
the special purpose of subscribing were Tennesseans, 
each of whom gave his left arm to the Confederacy. 
Both were lost in the Johnston-Sherman camiiai.un in 
Georgia in 1864. due of them. Dr. W. J. McMurray, 
was -hot many tunes in the war. He is not a pen- 
sioner, hut has done much gratuitous service for the 
Tennessee Soldiers' Home and for the Tennessee In- 
dustrial School, a most worthy charity. The other, 
P. 1'. Pickard, made good crops plowing with hi- one 

arm for a time succ lint' the war. and then lie was 

promoted to the important office of Comptroller for the 

State Afterward he declined to he an applicant for 

re election, and engaged in banking at his capital city. 

They went to school together after Losing their arms. 



In calling attention to the full-pane advertisement 
of Messrs. ('has. Thurm nn A- Co., who have " the largest 
clothing house in the South," the interesting fact is 
stated that when a movement was under way here at 
Nashville to raise money for the Davis Monument in 
Richmond, Gen. Thurman, a native Virginian, hut an 
adopted Tennessean, bid along with prominent Con- 
federates, one of whom was United State- Senator 
Bate, for a souvenier spoon with < fen. Lee's face upon 
it, and he secured it for the handsome amount of 
sixty dollars, and gave his check for it. 



M essrs. West. Johnston A* Co., of Richmond, adver- 
tise Greg's United States History, etc., in the CONFED- 
ERATE Veteran. The Richmond committee on teach- 
ers and schools directed that eighteen copies of this 
history he purchased for each of the public schools of 
the city. The committee requested the superinten- 
dent to call attention of teachers to that history, in 
order that they might combat erroneous statements in 
other histories. 



( If the first clubs from Camps, West Point, Va., sends 
21 ; Huntington, W. Va., sends 12, and Belton, Texas 
sends 17. Jacksonville, Fla., sends 100. 

Wanted. — To buy. immediately, Confederate Money, Con- 
federate Stamps on original envelopes, old U. 8. Stamps older 
than INT-, ami old Coins. Describe exactly what you have 
got, and address, EDWAED S. .Ionks, Garland Avenue, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. (11) 



6 4 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



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best style at reasonable rates; satisfaction guaranteed. Estimates cheerfully furnished. 



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Willi Introduction and Biographical Sketch 
cif the lamented author by his friend, 
John M.Gaut, Esq. Four uiindre I pages, 
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page steel portrait oi Dr. Balrd. 

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The plan of this great I k is simple. 

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pre-eminently a man of affairs. Living 
in the world, he loved it, strove to help 
it, without himself being worldly. In 
this last literary work of his life lie has 
left us a record of his common-sense, 
warm-hearted thinking about right liv- 
ing. He wrote as be talked, fervidly, 
Btrikingly, and every one of the four 
hundred pages of this valuable Volume 
sparkles with ureal ideas, ennobling, in- 
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CAMPAIGNS AND BATTLES 

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Sixteenth Regiment of Tennessee Volunteers, 

HV COL. THOMAS A. HEAD. 



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The book is a collection of Chancellor 
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ITS POSSIBLE FUTURE and 
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BY REV. lOSIAH STRONG, I). 1)., 

General Secretary of the Evangelical Alliance 
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The B. H. Stief Jewelry Company, 

The Lkaiung Jkwki.ehs "i thk SoTJTH. have now in stock one of the finest displays of 
choice and elegant eoode ever bronchi t<> this market. Fresh novelties received daily. 

WATCHES Gold, Silver, and Nickel Cased, from the finest and most costly, ranging 
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THE MSHVILLE AMERICAN. 



Thie old, old paper, published at it* stale Capital, baa 
been the utterance of the Democratic party in Tennes- 
see for generations. 

ITS GREETING TO THE CONFEDERATE VETERAN 

Was typical of its nature, and it immediately enlisted 
to serve it to the utmost. 



The Weekly American and the Confederate Veteran, both One Year 
for $1, the price of the American alone. 



STOCKELLJFERRISSJ&. BAILEY, 

Garden VrFieldJSeeds. 

Prcduce.lFruitsfandlConimission, 
145 N.[Market St , Nashville, Tenn. 

JAMES T. CAMP, 

BOOK AND 

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County and Civil Work a Specialty. 



Orders liy mail carefully executed. 
Write for estimates. 

317 Union Street, Nashville, Tenn. 



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J. D. BLANTON, PRESIDENT, 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 







Qopfed£f<at^ l/eterap. 

Published Monthly in the Interest of Confederate Veterans and Kindred Topics. 



Prick ."> Cents 
Yearly ."»a 



STS. I \- 1 T 

Cents, i » ul - *■• 



Nashville, Tkxx.. March, 1S93. 



XT-, , [8. A. CUNNINGHAM, 
-L>u. <v 1 Editor and Manager. 



Conquered Banners — All Furled Now. 




No. 1. 



No. 2. 



( 


^ 


( 1 




\ V" 




* ^1 




1 V 






No. 1. The "Stars and Bars" was the tlrst flag of the Confederate States, and was adopted by the Confederate Congress In session 
at Montgomery, Alabama. 

No. 2. The "Bailie Flat;" was designed by General Beauregard, and adopted by General Joseph K. Johnston after tbe first battle 
of Bull Run, and afterward adopted by the Confederate Congress. The reason for tbe adoption i»f said "Battle Flat:" was. that in tbis 
first battle of Manassas the "Stars and Bars" was, in the smoke of battle, several times mistaken for the "Stars and Stripes," and rice 
versa. Tbis remained as the "Battle Flag" until the close of the war. 

No. 3. On May 1, lsis, the Confederal. ■ Congress adopted this Hag as tbe "National Flag" of the Confederate stales. 

No. 4. On March t. 1865, the Confederate Congress adopted this design as the "National Flag" of the Confederate States, for the 
reason that when the flag adopted on May 1, 1868, fell limp around the start it looked like a flag of truce— the White only showing; there- 
fore the red bar was put aeross the end so it could never be mistaken for a fla<j a] hurt: 



is63 iss: 



The Nashville Shorthand Institute 

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and Terms mailed on application. 



OX TO THE WORLD'S FAIR! 

If you .in- going, communicate "/ once with the \\'ohi.i>'s 
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Confederate Veteran. 



Published Monthly in the Interest of Confederate Veterans and Kindred Topics. 



Price 5 Cents. 



) 



Yeaki.v :*) Cents. r 



Vol. I. 



Nashville, Tenn., March, 1893. 



No. 3. 



- \ CUNNINGH \M. 
j Editor and Manager. 



Entered at the Postofflce, Nashville, Tenn., as B< nd-class matter. 

S] i ; 1 1 club rates to the Press and to Camps 25 copies S10. 

An extra copy sent t < > each person who sends Blx subscriptions. 

Advertisements: One dollar per inch one time, or 810 a year, ex- 
cept last page; S2S :. page. Discount: Half year, one-eighth; one 
year, one-fourth. 

The flags printed on title page are courteously fur- 
nished by Col. John P. Hickman. Secretary of the 
Tennessee Division oi Confederate soldiers. He i 
cured the official data from the records at Washington 
and besides he wrote Mr. l>avis before his death and 
the report was confirmed by him. 

Till': extracts from the diary of Alexander II. 

Stephens, while Vice President id' the ( 'i in federate 

States and in prison at Fori Warren near Boston, 
which were promised in this issue, are held over for 
subsequent issues. 

Dr. .1. W, Morton, who made superb reputation as 
the youngest artillery captain of the ( 'on federate army, 
has maintained for a long time a "Confederate Cor- 
ner" in his agricultural paper, the Tennessa Farmer, 
published at Nashville. 

A GOOD lady teacher in Tennessee has added nicely 

to the subscription list of this journal by giving copies 

to the students, who are glad to subscribe, not for 
study in school, but rather as a recreation from the fa- 
tigue iif delving into text hooks. It seems a good 
plan, and teachers generally may do cleverly by fol- 
lowing the example of this patriotic lady. 

The story of Gen. Sherman at Jackson, Miss., after 
the evacuation by < len. Joseph E. Johnston, may seem 
incredible, but is probably correct. The editor of the 

CONFEDERATI VETERAN had experience that he pro- 
poses to tell in the April number, which will be in- 
teresting to people who would like to know how a 
large army can steal away from the presence of an- 
other without its movement being detected by thou- 
sands of sentinels who look and listen in almost 
breathless anxiety. 

Several corrections have been submitted by com- 
rades of errors in list of V . ('. V. Camps, and not yet 
made. Gen. John Boyd, of Kentucky, who gives 
about one-fourth of his time to Confederate interests, 
notes that the Camp at Georgetown is named for Geo. 
W. Johnson, and at Versailles the Camp is named for 
Abe. Buford, and not Alex, as printed. It is very 
desirable to keep this list accurate, and friends noting 
errors will be very kind to help in corrections. Special 
request is made of the Camps in Arkansas to supply 
the names of Commanders and Adjutants. 



'I'm: death ..f Gen. Pierre Gustave Toutonl Beaure- 
gard, Last of tie- five generals named by the Confede- 
rate Congressj and, with the single exception of Kirby 
Smith, of Sewanee, Tenn., the last full general of the 
Confederacy, has been announced. He had been very 

ill hut had recovered, and a few hours prior to his 

death appeared in unusuallj good spirits, dining with 
his family, and afterward spending some time in his 
library with his children and grandchildren. Shortly 
afterward a nurse chanced to go the General's room, 
and was horrified to find him in the death struggle. 
Before the family could reach the chamber he was 
.had. An interesting sketch of him was giv< n in I he 
February Veteran. A movement has been inaugu- 
rated to secure the erection of a suitable monument to 
his memory. The New Orleans Picayvme, of recenl 

date, -ays it has receive. 1 from Col. Alex. R. Chisholm, 
of New York City, a letter, under Feb. 23, inclosing a 
.heck for $100, toward erecting the monument. He 
writes: "I well know that your city will enct an ap- 
propriate monument to him, hut 1 do not wish it to 
be said of me that I waited for anyone to ask that of 
me which love for that good man fores spontaneously 
from my heart." 

Proceedings in honor of Gen. Beauregard had at va- 
rious points in Texas, with a letter from his close per- 
sonal friend, Gen. W. L. Cabell, were received too late 
for this issue. 

The leading editorial in this issue furnishes a topic 
that will be discussed both South and North. Discus- 
sion of the subject will do good. The paper on this 
subject by Wm. M. Green will be criticised by some of 
our good friends in his reference to the Indians. It 
will he seen, however, that he refers to the Red Man 
"as a roving savage," therefore not including those 
who are as good citizens as any of us. They were 
loyal, faithful soldiers in the Southern army and who 
were as good citizens as can be found among the 
whites. Many of them have grown rich and are much 
honored. No more loyal members of the United Con- 
federate Veterans can be found than in both the In- 
dian and Oklahoma Territories. 

N \ s n v 1 1 . i . k is to have a rich treat April 7 and 8, in 
amateur entertainment- for the Cheatham Bivouac. 
The next Veteran may give the plan, if very suc- 
cessful, as a model for other organizations. 

(Jen. W. H. Jackson has appointed Frank A. Moses, 
of Knoxville, Brigadier General in command of the 
Eastern Division U. C. V. of Tennessee. 



66 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



5CSIBERS TO DA ITS MONl MEST. 



In the January and Februaay issues as completes 
list of subscriptions to the Davis Monument as could 
be procured was published. This has been regarded a 
most important service. In this issue only some new 
ones have been published. It is expected, however, 
t" republish in the next number the entire report of 
receipts, and to provide for an accurate statement 
monthly, so that all w In > are interested can know just 
what is being done. This information will be request- 
ed from the Monument Association. 

The original purpose of this journal was to make 
showing by the General Agent of all the monies that 
came into his hands. It was not expected in the out- 
set thai so cordial and enthusiastic regard would be 
shown for the little journal as a periodical. It- editor 
is as grateful as comrade can he to comrade, ami is 
willing to live on "hard tack' 1 again, if necessary, 
in sustaining a peaceful brotherhood. Some frieuds 
seem to regard the Veteran as complimentary. It is 
h eap and is of such fine material that, in justice to 
patrons, there can be no dead-heads. 



The time for the March issue is later than was in- 
tended, sine,- publication day is to be advanced grad- 
ually to first week of the month. The acceptance of 
the Confederate Veteran, the large number of 
copies issued, ranging between five and six thousand 
these first issui -. is doubtless the most remarkable in 
the history of journalism. If our friends continue 
their zeal it will soon have a prominence which will 
amaze the business world. Energy and enthusiasm 
are very desirable now. If comrades and friends 
generally would do as Dr. Yandell in El Paso, Texas, 
secure patronage from all available material, or like 
Mr. W. I). Matthews, in Jacksonville, Fla., with a 
population largely Northern, send over ninety, all at 
lull rate, the world would be amazed. The South 
would indeed still show solidity as a brotherhood. 

John R. Deering, of St. Louis, has kindly sent a 
copy of t'oiijt'ili rale An mils, published in his city Aug- 
ust, 1883, by J. W. Cunningham. It is a well printed 
pamphlet of \1 pages, Ixfi inches print. The price is 
81.50 a year, three times the price of the Veteran, 
while the size is only about two-thirds. Unhappily it 
was short-lived. The foregoing facts suggest the 
necessity of economic management and perpetual 
zeal "ii the part of my friends. Greater zeal has not 
been manifested, perhaps, than is apparent for the 
VETERAN. As an illustration of my sentiment in 
doing the best possible for comrades and for the cause, 
I note publishing a reminiscence of my regiment, the 
Forty-first Tennessee, some years ago and supplying it 
gratuitously to comrades. I would not accept com- 
pensation from any one of them. It contained 60 
pages. 



1 1,E 'jar is often expressed thai material for the 
{ " v '-edkuatk Veteran will become exhausted, and 
iliat it cannot lie made entertaining as it has started. 
Veterans, don't have anxiety on this subject. It would 
take generations to cover the field. It is inexhaustible. 

Calling at the office of Biscoe Hindman (whose ad- 
vertisement of the New York Mutual Insurance Com- 
pany is in this issue), 1 was attracted by a life-size 
portrait of hi- father, Gen. Thos. C. Hindman, and 
secured brief but thrilling data concerning his brill- 
iant career and his intimacy with Pat Cleburne. The 
son is commander of the Sons of Confederate Veterans 
at Nashville, named in honor of Gen. Hindman. 

The funeral of Alex. Bolton, at Nashville, recently, 
was an event worthy of notice to all comrades. He 
was a private soldier in the war and a policeman 
inaily ever afterward. A plain, plodding man, whose 
courage and devotion to duty made him a host of 
friends. The occasion was remarkable in the state- 
, nient that it is said to have been the largest funeral 
ever seen in Nashville. He was a member of the 
Cheatham Bivouac, ami there were about one hun- 
dred and fifty members of it in the procession. 

In the ''make up" of the first forms for this issue 
there is an error in classification.. On page 88 the 
"Monument of Army of Tennessee" is at New Or- 
leans, as are those to the Washington Artillery, to R. 
E. Lee, and also that other improperly headed as West 
Virginia, which should be to Army of "Northern" 
Virginia. The Richmond monuments have the same 
unfortunate classification on the same page. 



AT KLVX KLAN. 



Although forgotten now, except at the sight of the 
frightful name, the "Ku Klux Klan" was one of the 
most extraordinary organizations in history. It went 
out of life as it came into it, shrouded in deepest mys- 
tery. Its members would not disclose its secrets; 
others could not. The story was published in the 
Century about ten years ago and it appeared at Nash- 
ville in book form in L884. It is a small book, 11(> 
pages, large print, at 50 cents. I have secured any 
wanted of the few hundred left, at U> cents each. 
Subscribers to the Confederate Veteran can have it 
for that. Postage "> cents. 



C. I>. Bell, Bell, Ky. : "We who engaged in the late 
unpleasantness on the side that lost, wish the truth 
should be told in regard to our actions and prove the 
various persons who are writing the incidents of the 
late war are true and tried veterans. Hoping to be 
able to increase tin 1 subscription, I am one of the old 
boys." 

Rev. W. A. Nelson. Aiken, S. C: "I had no idea of 
seeing you again on the journalistic wave, but you are 
there, and I believe you will make a success of it. 
You have my hearty sympathy and prayers. But you 
know you can always depend on me. This you have 
found out from an experience of twenty-five years. I 
send you my subscription and others." 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



67 



INAVOVRA TION REVIXISt K.\< 7X 



What a magnificent city is our National Capital! 
The Capitol building, other public buildings for tin- 
various departments, the White House and the Wash- 
ington Monument deserve such surroundings as have 
been constructed. The avenues, streets and circles are 
fittingly constructed for the scores of monuments thai 
have been erected. The equestrian statue of old 
Hickory (similar to the one on Capitol Hill, Nashville, 
and another in New Orleans 1 stands directly across 
Pennsylvania avenue from the White House Aside 
of that there are few other statues about the city com- 
memorating the achievements of Southern men. True, 
there is a superb figure of the Father of the Country 
in front of the Capitol building, but nine-tenths, per- 
haps, of the monuments were erected after the war and 
in honor of heroes on the Union side. 

But I have wandered. It is about inauguration 
days that I began to write. It is a profound thing to 
be made President of the United States, and when 1 
saw the honor conferred upon Garfield I forgave < .rant 

for wanting a third term. The Tenness lelegation, 

composed of the Legislature ami others who had gone 
to the inauguration, called in a body In the East 
room, where receptions are held, there were present 
.scores of otlieials and other favored friends, s.> there 
was barely room to pass in line to where the President 
stood that we might shake hands with him. There 
was a dead si illness when my time arrived t" otlcr my 
hand, and when I said "Mr. President!" a pleasant 
sensation was created by the digression. He smiled 
and others about him laughed outright. 

When a like delegation of Tennesseans called on Mr. 
Harrrison I was" of the party, numbering aboul 200, 
ami the little man stood alone in the same large room, 
mechanically shaking hands with the throng, not a 
word being spoken. We were going at a l>risk rat.. 

and when extending my hand I said. "Mr. (' -, 

your brother's friend." "I'm glad to sec you'" said 
he. holding my hand longer than the rule: hut the 
line hail its impetus, and 1 hurried on to regain my 
place. The next fellow, a gawky countryman, said as 
we emerged from the room,"] don't believe he told 

the truth. He said he was glad t<> sec inc." 

1 always felt a certain repugnance to the custom of 
shaking hands with men in high position who cannot 
possibly reciprocate the sentiment, and I once got out 
of line to avoid shaking hands with Grover Cleveland, 
although 1 regard him as the most admirable official 
that has been President for generations. 



Gen. Hancock was in Washington when (iarficld. 
who defeated him for the Presidency, was inaugurated. 
The Tennessee delegation honored itself by calling on 
him at Willard's Hotel. It was my fortune to have 
charge of the three ladies of the party, and we were 



last of all to enter. The delegation had gone in single 
file toward the center of the large parlor. The gentle- 
man making the introductions, near the door, did not 
know me and so I had to introduce myself. A young 
countryman preceded me. and on greeting him Gen. 
Hancock said, "Tennesseans are tall men." Stepping 
promptly forward 1 said. " Heres a small Tennessean, 
General," ami. giving my name, turned to the lad 
introducing each as the daughter of so and so — all of 
whom were well known in their day. The General 
hail met tin' senior of the ladies "years and years ago" 
without knowing that she was the same lady. When 

he realized that she was still Miss . he didn't 

"recollect how many years." By the sudden change 
in affairs it seemed to devolve upon me to -tart a 
theme after the introductions, although I had not 
thought of saying a word. Calling attention to his 
remark about Tennesseans. he responded that in Mex- 
ico he was a liated with Tennesseans and remem- 
bered them a- tall men. Then a happy way of escape 
Occurred through my asking if he remembered tin 
Subsequent to that in Mexico, when Tennesseans were 
tall men. Hi- special distinction at Gettysburg is ab- 
ated with the hotly contested struggle between his 
men ami Tennesseans 

Afterward 1 sent him ;i prospectus of a little pe- 
riodical stalled as an "exponent of Southern senti- 
ment in New York," along with an article beaded "A 
tall Tennessean." To my surprise he wrote me a very 
kind letter ami afterward sent a subscription for the 
publication. 

After the General's death Mrs. Hancock did me the 
great compliment to -end me ;i copy of her bonk, the 
Reminiscences <>i his life. No other book so distinct- 
ively illustrates that we are "one people" as does this. 
It deserves a place in Southern homes. With tic 
hope of a review by and by, I quote a few paragraphs. 
She pays exquisite tribute to the wife of the then Sei - 
retary of War, Jefferson Davis, saying: "She was en- 
dowed with many remarkable qualities that made her 
eminently fitted for a presiding genius, and her enter- 
tainments brought together the most cultivated class 
of Washington Bociety." Mrs. Joe Johnston was "an- 
other shining light in that great capital." * * * 
She writes of Lee : "How well I remember Gen. Robert 
E. Lee. then a Major, who was stationed there at that 
time. He was the beau ideal of a soldier and a gentle- 
man. When bidding us 'good by' and 'God speed' 
upon the eve of our departure he said to me: I under 
stand that you contemplate deserting your post, which 
is by your husband's side, and that you are not going 
to California with him. If you will pardon me I 
should like to give you a little advice. You must not 
think of doing this. As one considerably older than 
Hancock, and having had greater experience, I con- 
sider it fatal to the happiness of young married people, 
upon small provocation, to live apart, either for a short 



68 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



or long time. The result is invariable that they cease 
to I"- essential t" each other. Now. promise me that 
you will not permit him to sail without you.' The 
sequel shows how Faithfully I Bought to follow ili;»t 
noble man's admonition, and how often in my varied 
experience 1 had occasion to transmit to others Ins 
disinterested truthful convictions." 



STORY FROM THE HANKS. 



hi;. II. W. .t/l.v.vov. OF ROCKWALL, TEXAS, TELLS A 
THRILLING STORY. 



It was the 2d day of April, 1865. 1 was acting Ser- 
geant Major in Capt. Dale- Battalion of Sharpshooters, 
near Petersburg, Va. I bad sat up nearly all the night 
before playing chess with a red-headed Captain of the 
First Tennessee. A Little before day, firing was heard 
on the picket line, and the sharpshooters under Dale, 
Harris and Beaumont were ordered to the front. After 
going to the place where the picket line should have 
been, it was found that the enemy had broken it and 
that also, by a ilauk movement, they had broken the 
main line between our position on that line and Peters- 
burg. There was nothing left for us to do hut to make 
our way hack to the breastworks and rejoin the brigade 
i Archer's) as quickly and as safely as possible. It was 
no very easy thing to do under the circumstances, as 
any body of men coming from the direction in which 
the soldiers thought the enemy were, would surely be 
fired on without stopping to ask any questions. But 
each minute was worth a million of dollars. If we re- 
mained a little longer the whole command would be 
surrounded and captured. Besides, our brigade needed 
our help. The writer was ordered to double-quick to 
the main line, take the chances of being shot by our 
own men, pass rapidly down on top of the breastworks, 
causing our men to hold their fire until ('apt. Day 
could oblique his shapshooters into the main line or 
he breastworks. 

After a hard run and escaping a number of bullets 
sent to meet us by the men in the works, the line 
was gained, and the sharpshooters were safely over the 
works, with but few wounded. We were not a mo- 
ment two soon. The enemy had broken through and 
was reaching out in the rear, but when they struck our 
part of the line the old brigade, with a yell and a 
charge, retook some of the works in a regular devils' 
picnic. 

While engaged in this movement, a tall, angular 
Federal, standing on the works more exposed to the 
fire than anyone, brought his gun to hear on my face 
at a point blank range of less than forty steps. A 
dodge behind a corner of a rude log hut built for win- 
ter quarters saved my life, for at that moment the bark 
spattered in my face as the ball grazed the log. With 
a prayer for the soul of the bravest Yankee I ever saw 
my trusty Sliarpe's rifle was aimed at the tall man's 
breast, and at the crack of the gun he fell from the 
earth-works. 

About this time Capt. Arch Norris ordered me to 
rally the sharpshooters and try to check the column 
on our left. At the rally call a handfull of seven re- 
sponded — seven men that would try anything — and 
they charged that column. Some were killed and 
others wounded. At the first volley I tumbled to the 
ground with a broken leg. I had hardly touched the 



ground when John llarlin. of Wilson county, Tenn., 
Jim 1 learn, Coles, and another man, name forgot- 
ten, had me on a stretcher and were trying their best 
to get mi to the real-. By this time the line was broken 

and the enemy had it all their own way. 

They soon sent their bullets so thick around and 
into the litter-bearing party that the men were toned 

to have me to my fate. Another minute found me in 
the hands of the advance skirmishers, and they pro- 
ceeded to relieve me of my watch and money; hut a 
big, red-faced, thick-set Major made his way to me, 

and. alter a friendly grasp of the hand, he hail my val- 
uable- returned and four of his men detailed to take 
me hack to the field hospital, and by no means to 
leave me until I was safely in charge of a certain sur- 
geon, a Mason and the Major's friend. On the way 
hack Jesse Cage, of Nashville, was picked up, with his 
leg broken, and placed in the same ambulance. About 
1 o'clock that evening, as the wounded men lay on a 
bed of straw in a huge hospital tent. Cage was carried 

out under the trees and, as the tent Sap was thrown 

hack, I could see him under the influence of chloro- 
form while the surgeons took his leg oil'. He was soon 
brought back to his straw bed, and with a shudder 1 
heard the litter-hearers say, "Your time next." I was 
placed on the table, chloroform was administered and, 
when I awoke from slumber, my dancing days were 
over and 1 was a hopeless cripple for life. 

Two days after the above I saw the man I had fired 
at on the breastworks walk into the tent, but, to my 
astonishment, he was shot in the back part of bis jaw. 
falling him to my bed, 1 found that he was the same 
man, and his wounds were explained by himself thus: 
"I shot at a feller at the corner of a cabin, and missed 
him, when he shot me in the breast here," pulling 
open his shirt, "the hall hitting in front on the collar- 
bone and knocking me oil' the works. Some of our 
own cowardly fellows shot me in the jaw after I got 
up." I explained that I was the "feller that drew a 
bead" on him, an i explained that the want of force 
in the ball was due to the inferior cartridges used. 

These two soldiers ended their war here. The one 
that walked waited on the one that couldn't walk, and 
they two who had shot at each other would have risked 
their lives each in the other's defense. I cannot now 
remember this brave man's name. He belonged to a 
Pennsylvania regiment. The acquaintance lasted 
only three days, hut that was long enough for God 
to teach two erring mortals that brave men bore no 
malice, and, as they grasped each other's hand for a 
final separation, they each breathed a sigh of thank- 
fulness that " I didn't kill you." 

Reader, please pardon the apparent egotism. We 
can only write what came under our immediate ob- 
servation. The death and wounding of great men, 
the victory and defeat of armies, have been and will 
be told by a thousand pens, but there are none to tell 
these little incidents except the actors themselves. 



[Lampassas, Tex., Leader.] 



It is devoted to the interests of the Confederate vet- 
erans, and urges strongly the erection of the Davis 
Monument. The papers it contains are well written, 
and it is beautifully printed and altogether gotten up 
in an attractive manner. Price 50 cents. Judge D. C. 
Thomas will take your subscriptions for the journal, 
if you desire, and will furnish you sample copies of 
the same. 






CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



69 



BUILD THE DAVIS MOUMKNT. 



THE SOUTHERN PEOPLE TO UNITE IN THE WORTHY UN- 
DERTAKING. 



The committee appointed by Gen. J. B. Gordon, 
of Georgia, Commander of the United Confederate 
Veterans, of one from each State, met in Richmond, 
Sept. 17. by direction oi its chairman, Gen. W. L. 
Cabell, of Texas, to consider the location, cost of con- 
struction, plans, etc., for the Davis Memorial. The 
Richmond Association participated in the proceedings. 

The general purposes were set forth by the chairman 
in a series nt resolutions. They were thai ''as Rich- 
mond was the capital of the 1 lonfederacy, and lias been 
selected by Mrs. Jefferson Davis as the burial place of 
her husband, it is regarded the most appropriate place 
for the erection of a monument to his rriBmory, Tin- 
United Confederate Veterans will co-operate with the 
Davis Monument Association of Richmond and the 
Southern Press Association in its efforts to erect the 
same." Also that State organizations be formed, and 
" that the chairman appoint for each Southern State 
and for tin' Indian and Oklahoma Territories a sub- 
committee of live members, each of which shall have 
within its territory the entire control and supervision 
of all matters pertaining to this sacred object, includ- 
ing the collection of funds by popular subscription, 
and shall have authority to name a suitable and r< 
sponsible person as treasurer, to receive the same and 
forward quarterly to the treasurer of the Richmond 
Associal ii m." 

Gen. Cabell has made the following appointments, 
selecting from Veteran Associations: 

Virginia Hen Thomas A Brander, Chairman; Hon J Taylor Elly- 
son, Col Peyton Wise, Hon George L Christian, Richmond; Ma] W I 
Sut herlin, Danville. 

Tennessee >S A Cunningham, Chairman, Nashville; Col CWFra- 
aer, Memphis; Uen J F Shtpp, Chattanooga; Gen Prank \ Moses, 
Know llli'. 

Indian Tekkitoky — Gen NP Guy, Chairman, McAlester: Gen John 
L Hall. Hon 11 W Carter, Ardmore; Col R B Coleman, Mc Vlesti r; Gen 
I) M Haley, Krebs. 

Arkansas Uen Ben T DuvaltChalrman, Fori Rmitb: Senator Jas 
Berry, Ben ton ville; Col Jordan El ravens, Clarksville; Ma] \ S Cab* 
ell. Fort smith; Urn Anderson Uordon, Morrillton. 

Kentucky— Gen John Boyd, ' nairman, Lexington; Gen Bazit 
Duke, Louisville; Hon W c p Breckinridge, Lexington; Gen w V 
Ferry, Bowling Green; Ex-Gov 8 B Buckner, Louisville 

Georgia Gen P M B Young, Chairrasn, Carter6vl lie; Gtn W ] i it 
himn. Atlanta; Capt A P Roberts, Dalton; DrJ William Jones, Gen 
Clemant A Evans, Atlantai 

\i \i;\m\ Gen J 'J Holtzclaw, Chairman, Montgomery; GenFS 
Ferguson, Birmingham ; Cant George II Cole, Eutaw; Gen Joseph 
Wheeler, Wheeler; Josi ph F Johnston, Birmingham. 

Florida GenJ .1 Dlckison, Chairman, >jcala; Col FredLRobert- 
son, Brooksville; Gov F P Fleming Jackson vilh . Gen George Reese, 
Pensacola; Gen S C French, Grlando. 

Soi ru Carolina -Gen Ellison Capers. Chairman, Gen Wade 
Hampton, Columbia; Gen John Bratton, Winnsboro; Gen Stanley S 
Crittenden, Grei nvllle; Capl H II Teague, liken. 

North Caroi.in a Geo V. D Hall, Chairman, Wilmington; Gen R 
F Hoke, Raleigh; Hon Rufus Barn nger, Charlotte; Hon Matt WRan- 
soim. Gratsburg; M O Sberrill, Newton. 

Mississippi Gen Stephen D Lee, Chairman, Starkville; Gov .1 M 
Stone, Ex-Gov Robert Lowery, Jackson; Col C C Flowerree, Vicks- 
burg; Lieut Fred J V Let and, Natchez. 

Division ok the Northwes] Gen J < I nderwood, Chairman, Col 
Samuel Baker, Maj F H Southma.vd, Maj Jere S White, Col R Lee 
Fra i i thicagi >. 

l.ocisiwv Gen John Glynn, chairman; Gen .1 A Chalaron, Gen 
L .lastremski. Brig Gen Charles A Harris, Lol W R Lyman, New Or- 
leans. 

Missouri— Gen I harles C Rainwater, Chairman, Si Louis; Capt Jos 
W Mercer, Kansas i it\ ; rapt Henry Guiber, Col Darwin Marma- 
dukf. Col w P Barlow, St Louis. 

Maryland— Gen George H Stewart, Chairman. Baltimore. Gen 
Stewart to appoint four associates. 

i iklahoma TERRITORY— Gen Samuel T Leavy, Chairman, Norman. 
(o'ii l.r:i\\ to appoint lour associali s. 

There has been lack of active co-operation on the 
pari of some of the foregoing committees, lien. W. 
11. Jackson, Chairman for Tennessee, being unable to 
serve, S. A. Cunningham was put in his place, lien. 
John Boyd, the Kentucky Chairman, although full of 
zeal, has been unable to serve. The same is true of 



Gen. Rainwater, of Missouri, and Gen. Capers, of South 
Carolina. 

Gens. Hiekison.of Florida, Hall, of North Carolina. 
and Lee, of Mississippi, have been zealous from the 
start, and will doubtless make good showings in their 
report. Texas is not in the above list, but the "Lone 
Star" is sure to shine brightly in the exhibit. 

Brow nsville — [Haywood County's Contribution] 
— The undersigned committee collected amounts from 
the following named persons, to be applied toward the 
election of the proposed monument in honor of the 
late Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States 
of America. It was deposited in the Haywood County 
Bank, to the credit of Green & Taylor, editors of the 
States-Democrat, agents for the fund: hi'A 1! Haywood. 

Glasgow Hayw 1. Mi-- Carrie Tipping, Miss Anebel 

Moore. Miss Cora Sevier, J. K. Cause. MrsR 11 Ander- 
son, W A Roberts, Henry ■' Livingston, Jr., MissGen- 
i \ ieve Livingston, Mrs Laura A Livingston. Miss Lucy 
C Livingston, Miss Nettie Jordon Livingston, Rev W 
L Dabney, -I E Carter. Prof T \V Crowder, K E Walk- 
er, Isaac H Read, Ii M Bradford, T A Tripp, Read Hay- 

w I, J B Phillips, Sr., J B Phillips, Jr., Miss Lillian 

Phillips. Miss Edna Phillips, ('heps Bedford, 1. 11 Bo 
rum, W II Haywood, Dr J G Haywood,Jr., Hold Hay- 
wood, Mi-s Sadie C Cray. VV RHolbrook, Miss Mary 
s Livingston, Rosa Gibson Livingston, Miss Helen 
mil Livingston, Howell T Livingston. Henrj 
I ic Livingston, Miss Rosa V Gibson, Miss Mat tie Dab- 
ney, Capt R S Russell, Maj L A Thomas, Dr J S Pat- 
ton, John P McLeod, Mann Wills. W E Capell, Emil 
Tamm, G II Moorer, DrJ G Haywood. Sr , John R 
Green, Ursula Green, Mattii C Green, Susan K G 
J 1) Green, all gave 81 each: Maj W K Bennett, 

deceased, T -I Moses, deceased, $1 '. :h; Prof E S 

Tii In nor. John W Herring, -I W E Moore, W W Rut- 
ledge. A F Yancey, $2 cad,: T W King, Major .1 A 
Wilder, P B Anderson. Lev John Williams, ('apt A 1> 
Bright, $2 50 each ; W I. Anthony, S3; P R Winston, 
Lawrence W Livingston, deceased, Maj W J Somervell, 
deceased, John C Duckworth..! A Brewer, Dr John R 
Allen. Frank 1' Bond, Mrs Ella McLeskey, R H An- 
i. ( 'id Thomas Smith, Chancellor H.l Livingston. 
Mrs II .1 Livingston, Capl Alexander Duckworth, C A 
Moorer. W T Bullefin, Col Benj .1 Lea, Samuel Kille- 
brew,$5each Hay wood County Bank, $11.70. Total, 
8186.10. The excess over list as printed comes through 
smaller subscriptions than SI. 

The committee adopted the following; That the 
above named amount he kept in the Ha\ wood ( lounty 
Hank until there is a permanent organization formed 
for the purpose of having the Jefferson Davis Monu- 
ment erected. That any person desiring to contribute 
to the fund leave their contributions with the Hay- 
wood County Lank, which contributions will be 
promptly reported by the committee. All of which is 
respectfully submitted. W. A. Dabney, Chairman. 

R. H. Anderson, Secretary. 
J. W. E. M ,i . 

March 19, I s ' 111 Alex. Duckworth, Com. 



Brownsville, Tenn., Feb. 17, 1893. 
Editor of Confederate Veteban: Hear Sir — The 
undersigned committee has this day remitted to John 
S. Ellett, Treasurer of the Jefferson Davis Monument 
Association, Richmond, Va., the sum of $186.10, being 
the amount contributed by our citizens as shown by 
the inclosed copy of the report of the committee, that 



7° 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



is, $17440 and SI 1.70 contributed by said bank. We 
Bend you the report, with tin- names of the contribu- 
tors, thai you may copy the Bame. We would have 
made this remittance sooner, bul bad much trouble In 
rinding the report of the committee, and wanted to 
Bend along the names with the contribution. Green 
& Taylor, editors oi the Sales-Democrat, began the sub- 
scription, and at their suggestion a meeting was held 
here in February, 1890, at which most of the fund was 
subscribed. The meeting was presided over by Col. 
Thomas Smith, and was a large and representative 
gathering of the people of the county. Respectfully, 
Alex. Duckworth, J. W. E. Moore, John R.Green, R. 
II. Anderson, Secretary. 

Col. D. A. Campbell, Vicksburg, Miss.: Your correc- 
tion in February's Confederate Veteean changing 
our contribution to the Davis Monument Fund from 
Tennessee to Mississippi is appreciated. You know- 
it was from here this great and grand man began his 
military and political Life, and we cherish the wann- 
est affection for his memory. Kindly make a further 
correction, bo all the honors may fall where they justly 
and deservedly belong. The amount does not come 
from myCamp, but from our people, and was raised 
by three genuine Confederate women, one of them a 
wife and two of them daughters of rebel soldiers. 
These patriotic ladies are Mrs. James Welch, Mrs. 
Thomas Preston, and Mrs. Horace Marshall. The 
honor and praise is all theirs. These, with other noble 
women of our town, have in hand and almost paid for 
a $1,500 Confederate Monument, ready to be placed 
among the dead hoys as -non as warmer and more set- 
tle. 1 weather comes. The capital figure is a veritable 
Confederate soldier, and comes from Italy. We like 
your paper, and will forward practical evidence as soon 
as we get together. 

Robert Young. Eatonton, Ga. : "1 have sent $64.85, 
contributed by the people of Putnam county. Ga. (this 
county i, to the the 1 (avis Monument Fund. The same 
was collected in June, 1891, and has lain in bank ever 
since until the 25th of .January, when I sent it to our 
State Treasurer of the Fund, Col. W. L. Calhoun. The 
following is the list of names of those who contributed 
SI or m. .re: ,\ (i Mosely, $5; E B Ezell, $2.50; Alf 
Davis. c.M Davis, $2 each ; Robert Youm.'', W M Re- 
gan, T G Greene, Irhv T Kirkpatrick, B W Hunt, R 
B Nisbet, 1> B Nisbet, N S Reid, W F Senkins, E M 
Brown, Jos S Turner, C D Leonard, J M Robertson, 
J G Collinsworth, W I- Turner, E H Reese, L C Slade, 
II A Jenkins, Mr and Mrs T A Scales, Thomas (I Law- 
son, B W Adams, $1 each. The balance was in smaller 
contributions." 

Miss Je.innie I!. Crommelin, Montgomery, Ala.: 
" Last summer I sent you $143.85 for the Jefferson I »a- 
vis Monument in Richmond, Va., explaining in the 

letter that the amount was the proc Is of an enter- 
tainment given by the Ladies' Memorial Association. 
This Association is building a monument here on 
Capitol Hill to the Confederate dead of Alabama, 
which will cosi $45,000, and none of that money can 
be diverted from tin- purpose for which it was raised, 
therefore a special effort was made to raise the $1 13 85 
with the above result." 

.1. W. Simmons, who served in the Twentv-seventli 
Mississippi Regiment, hut now at Mexia, Tex.: "It 
appears to me that $250,000 is a very small amount for 
the monument, considering the cause and that it is the 



last opportunity that the people of the South will ever 
have t" act in concert to slew their united devotion t.» 
the cause and Leader they loved so well." 

Dr. II. W. Manson, Rockwell, Tex.: "Atacalled 
meeting of Rockwell Camp. Confederate Volunteers, 
Saturday. Jan, 21 . I was appointed a committee of one 
to raise, in -mall sums from each old soldier only, the 
sum ..I spi. and send it to you for the Davis .Monu- 
ment." 

• apt. .1. T. Wilson, (amp Mildred l.ee, Sherman. 
Tex.: "I notice that tic remains of Mr. Davis are to 
be taken to Richmond for burial May 30. It seems to 
me that it would he more appropriate to wait until 
the monument is completed and have it unveiled and 
Mr. 1 >avis buried during a reunion of the United I on- 
federate Volunteers." 

Judge W. H. Jewell, Commander of Camp 54, United 
Confederate Volunteers, Orlando, Fla.: "lam in receipt 

of the second number of the CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 
and find it full of good things. 1 send you a list of 
subscribers and will send more. 

" I regret to see that in the list of contributions to 
the Davis Fund Orlando is still left out and we must 
continue to lie under the reproach of indifference to 
this worthy and sacred cause, although we have sent 
to Capt. John Weber, Charleston, $100 fortius cause. 
Can't you give us the credit we are entitled to?" 

.1. \V. Simmons. Mexia, Tex.: "Inclosed you will 
programme and newspaper clippings of a Confederate 

concert we had here for the benefit of the Jefferson 
Davis Monument Fund, which netted $!)7.40, and will 
lie remitted through the Trans-Mississippi Depart- 
ment. 

Col. W. A. Smoot, Commander II. F. Fee Camp, 
Alexandria, Va. : " The committee of our Camp turned 
in to me to-day $3>S. 25, which I send to John S. Fllett, 
Treasurer, Richmond. Va., to be placed to the credit 
of the Jefferson Davis Monument Fund. We will have 
more later. This has been a hard winter on our Camp." 

Dr. W. M. Yandell, El Paso, Tex.: "Cook, of Belton, 
strikes the key-note to success in the monument affair. 
Money was subscribed here for the fund, hut nobody 

knows anything about the amount on hand or any- 
thing about the status of the fund. Let us have an 
explanation in full in the VETERAN, and I shall then 
see that El l'aso is given a chance to put up again." 

In the remittance of $110 for the Monument from 
Capt. W. G. Loyd, of Lewisburg, $85 is from the people 
of that town and Marshall county and $25 is from the 
Dihrell Bivouac. 

Bolivab — The list of contributors to the Davis Mon- 
ument at bolivar. Tcnn.. has not heretofore been pub- 
lished according to the rule of naming all amounts in 
excess of $1. Here is a line record: James Fentress, 
$20; Austin Miller, W. C. Doriop, R. H. Wood, W. W. 
Farley, J. C Savage, T. E. Moon-. Kahn Bros, and A. 
T. McNeal, $10 each ; P. W. Austin and W. T. Ander- 
son, $5 each; D. E. Durrett, $2.50. 

Dr. R. G. Slaughter, Winchester, Tcnn., remits, as 
proceeds from a young ladies' concert, Jan. 25, 1890, 
$2ti; for Joe G. Estill, now at Yale College, $2.50, and 
A. D. ('order, Sewanee, $1. 

Gloucester, Va., has a very pretty monument erected 
by private subscription to her fallen heroes. 1 write 
for and send you pamphlet of same. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



7i 



A DELIGHTFUL ENTERTAINMENT IN TEXAS. 

A benefit for the Davis Monument Fund, given re- 
cently at Mexia, Tex., under the management of Col. 
J. W. Simmons and S. II. Kelly, was a success in ev- 
ery particular. 

The overture by Misses Laura Rogers and Jassie 
Gibbs nil the piano, assisted by Messrs. T. ('. Becker 
and R. Sanders with violins, was a rare treat. 

The rendition of "Tenting To-nigh1 mi the Old 
Camp Ground," by the quartette composed of J. M. 
Long and wife. Mi-- ( ha Waller and I'. I.. Sheeks, was 
excellent. 

Mr. Hugh Everett gave a declamal ion entitled " The 
Poet Priest," a strikingly appropriate selei t ion. There 
is no personage thai adds more dignity and elegance 
to the Southland than does Father Ryan. 

"Origin of the Confederate Flag," a solo by Miss 
Waller, quite captured the audience and was followed 
by a continuous encore. 

Mrs. Henry Kamsler, gave a minute, interesting 
and vivid biography of Jefferson Davis. 

The quartette responded to applause and treated the 
audience to "My Maryland." and Mrs. R. 1'.. Harris 
gave a recitation, "The Blue an. I the 1 rray." 

The "Explanation oftbeRebel Yell," by II. I.. Hall, 
was received with much interest by both old and 
young. _ ' . 

[n "After the War," Mr. Hickman appeared in the 
role of tin 1 Southern planter with dignity and bearing, 
illustrating the consideration and 'generous spiril oi 
the typical Southerner to great advanta 

The Mexia Ledger gave an interesting account of the 
entertainment. 



COSFEDKRATK ASSOCIATION IS MARYLAND. 



Col. W. II. Pope, Superintendent Maryland Line 
Confederate Soldiers' Home, at Pikeville, sends with 
subscriptions t<> the Confederate Veteran a list of 

the Confederate organizations in Maryland. The 
names are a- follows: 

1. Society of the Army and Navy of the Confeder- 
ate States in Maryland, numbering 1,100 members. 

'J. Association of the Maryland Line, numbering 
600 members. 

3. Beneficial Association of the Maryland Lin< . 
numbering .">in* members. 

4. Murray Association, 50 members. 

5. Company A first Maryland Calvary. 30 mem- 
bers. 

6. Company C First Maryland Calvary. 50 mem- 
bers. 

7. Alexander Young Camp Confederate Veterans of 
Frederick County. Md.. 1(H) members. 

8. Baltimore Fight Artillcn Association, or Second 
Maryland Artillery, 60 members. 

'.•. Montgomery County Camp Confederate Veterans, 
Iik) members. 

He notes extensive improvements in the Home, 
and adds: "It is the finest Home in the country. We 
have at present a membership of eighty-five upon the 
roster, hut hail only six when the Home was formally 
.opened." 

C. H. Bailey, Clarksville, Tenn.: "I read with great 
interest the February number, and will call the atten- 
tion of the Bivouac at the March meeting to it, and 
have no doubt will secure you a good many subscribers. 




The above monument to Senator Benjamin H. Hill, 
of Georgia, is a tine likeness of the distinguished gen- 
tleman who was both a Confederate and a United 
States Senator. It was erected in the acute angle con- 
necting Peachtreeand West Peachtree streets, Atlanta, 
Ga., hut was subsequently moved into the newcapitol 
building. 

Lifk ok Senator Benjamin H. Hill.— Agents wanted every- 
where for "The Life. Speeches, and Writings of Senator Ben- 
jamin H. Hill." Special inducements to young men and 
women who desire to make money to complete their educa- 
tions, and to all who desire to attend the several Business and 
Medical Schools and the Law School of this city. Address, 

3-4 T. H. P. Bloodwobth, Atlanta, Ga, 



C< >N FEDERATE VETERAN. 



72 

Bi % T. Duval, of Fort Smith, is zealous for 
the monument cause. Hi expressed his intention to 
call his committee together some time sinci and to 
adopt measures for raising fund-. H< says: 

■■ I have organized since last March twelve Camps, 
and there are others in process of organization. 1 
have not been able to give any personal attention to 
it and for the last tu lis have had to perform 

all the duties of the Adjutant myself, inasmuch as 
my Adjutant was actively engaged as Deputy Sheriff. 
I give this information because you are generally ui- 
in the progress of the- organization ol < amps, 
and hope in time to be able to give yousomething in 
, nee to the Monument Association. 



ebui 



S. ('.. whil. 



John A. Hamilton, of Orang 
si nding his subscripl ion, asks : 

"Did Stonewall .lark-..,, fighl al 'Cold Harbor?' 
1 think the article about him says so." 

This inquiry was submitted to Dr. J. Win. Jones at 
Atlanta, who stati - : 

■• I,, reply to your favor of March 1, 1 will say thai 
of course Stonewall Jackson did fight at 'Cold Harbor, 
or 'Gaines' Mill' (for the two names are only applied 
to different parts 0} th saim battlefield) on the 27th oi 
June, L862. You know he had just completed his 
famous Valley Campaign, and, by Gen. Lee's orders, 
eluded the Federals, made his famous march to the 
Chickahominv, and had the Federal forces fortifying 
at Strausburg'against an expected attack from him at 
the very time he was thundering on McClellands 
Hank before Richmond. 1 am positive oi the fact be- 
cause my own regiment, the famous old Thirteenth 
Virginia, carried into that battle 306 men, and lost 
175 in kilhd and wounded, one of whom was my own 
brother." Dr. Jones adds: 

"1 want also, as soon as I can, to write you some- 
thing on the monuments in Lexington, Va., especially 
Valentine's recumbent figure of Lee, which is, in my 
judgment, the finest work of art on this continent. 
At the Last meeting of the Fulton County Confederat* 
Veteran's Association I brought up the matter oi the 
Vi iikw and urged the members to subscribe. Our 
Secretary, Maj. Edwards, agreed to take and forward 
to vou subscriptions, and we secured about ten thai 



night, though it was an im 



lenient evening and there 



was only a small attendance. I shall mention the 
matter again at our next meeting, and hope to in- 
crease the list." 



[El Paso, Tex.. Tim' • 

No man is more devoted to the work in hand, and 

1 has a \\ ider personal acquaintance with which 

to work. 



Messrs. E. 11. Roberts and Samui 1 G. Webb, Accountants 
and Collectors, Baxter Building, Cnion Street, Nashville, 
Temi., an- efficient, pr pt, and reliable. Parties at a dis- 
tance who, having business in their line at Nashville, are com- 
mended to Roberts & Webb. 



Wanted.— A few good traveling salesmen, who are capable 
of selling school specialties ami supplies to school hoards and 

trustees, nur j»ooi1h are something needed in every school. 
Territory "pen all Over the South. Live men can make $1,500 
to $2,500 per year in selling our goods. Address, 

F. H. Stick i.kv, < ieneral Manager, 
Nos. 75 ami 76 Baxter Court, Nashville, Tenn. 



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'I'm- htter of Daniel Webster to the father of Gen. 
R. E. Lee, "Light Horse Harry," is the property of 
Miss Mason Lee French, of Gallatin, Tenn. Her 
mother, who was a Miss Koscis, is a descendant of the 
Lee family, and this valued letter is one of their 
treasured ndics. The repetition of -you" is at the 
turn of a page. Yes, in 1846, Webster made speeches 
on the tariff and was glad his distinguished country- 
man was pleased enough to request copies. Moreover,, 
he desired to make his " personal acquaintance." 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



73 



THE ANTE-BELLAM SOUTHERN' WOMAN. 



DESCRIPTION OF HER LIFE, BY .MISS WINHIE DA Vis. 
■■ DAUGTHER OF THE CONFEDERACY.- 



Since the day of exploded ideals has arrived, when 
William Tell and < Jeorge Washington's little hatchet- 
yea, even the all-pervading Puritan who dominated 
ourschool histories — one and all have been dethroned 
from their sure scats, it seems as it' the traditional 
Southern woman of the old plantation life might be 
allowed to descend from the cross where she has hern 
nailed for generations. 

This graceful bul lackadaisiacal effigy of the imagin- 
ary "Southern Princess" who alternately lolled in a 
hammock in slothful self-indulgence, or arose in her 
wrath to scourge her helpless dependents, is the crea- 
tion which our neighbors have been pleased to call 
the " typical Southern v\ oman 

How different was the real housemistress who. on 
the greal river properties, before the war. ruled the 
destinies of her family with gentle and wise sway. To 
us wdio know her in her old aire it seems inexplicable 
that her place has been so long usurped by the figure 
fash toned by a hostile sculptor. 

What a blessing this woman is to the " New South," 
the South of struggles and poverty even the bitl 
of her detractors must acknowledge, now thai the 
clouds and smoke of battle begin to clear away and 
under the sun of peace reveal her true self. 

What she was in the larger and more complicated 
sphere of her old life is known only to those who took 
part in it. or to the younger generation who feel the 
beneficent influence of her character Had the women 
of the plantations b< en the lazy drones of the popular 
fancy, dreaming away their aimless lives in an atmo- 
sphere heavy with the odors of yellow jasmine, mag- 
nolias and roses, she would have been vanquished by 
the conditions over which she has been victorious. 

When war, pestilence, famine settled on her country 
the Southern woman, armed cap-a-pie with her hered- 
ity of good housewifery, self-control and patience, 
sprung uncomplaining and cheerful to her place, and 
vanquished her difficulties with a manly vigor and a 
womanly grace, the memory of which is very precioqs 
and sweet savored to those with whom she dwelt. 

OLD-FASHIONED VIRTUES AND TASTE. 

She probably did no1 understand the higher math- 
ematics, but her arithmetic sufficed for household ac- 
counts and to gauge her expenses 

Her family practice in the hospital of her plantation 
made her the best of nurses. 

Although her ideas >'\' modern philosophy may have 
been of the vaguest, gentle and sincere piety breathed 
thrdUgh all her arduous life, ami made of her the hot 
model for the half-ei vili/ed souls intrusted to her care, 
and also exerted refining influence over the men of 
her family. 

If among the Hebrews each man was a priest to his 
own family, among our people every woman officiated 
as priestess in the isolated corner where she dwell with 
the man toward whom "duty was pleasure and love 
was law." to whom "for better or worse" until death 
should them part. With her whole heart she gave ber 
best energies to his service. It was her mission to 
counsel and comfort the weak-hearted and succor all 
those who were desolate and distressed, were they of 
her own or of the subject race. She was the media- 



trix, the teacher, and. in short the mother 6f her peo- 
ple; and to her. if to anyone, the negro owes his pres- 
ent civilization and moral culture. 

The prejudices of her male relatives were arrayed 
against publicity of any kind for her — even the hom- 
age due to her virtues seemed an invasion of the sanc- 
tity of home. Thus tin 1 record of her deeds has Keen 

suppressed, and she blossomed, bore noble fruit, and 

faded behind a screen so thick that it ha- obscured to 
the outside world the gracious lines of her personality, 
and ber works alone praised her "in tin gates," but 
her children now rise up and call her blessed. 

HOW TIM; sol illl i;\ WOMAN WAS M:\i\M' 

I'ii understand the so-called " New South." it i- nec- 
essary to comprehend tin- actual duty of her mothers 
and the social relations which' brought forth a ra 
people honorable, kindly, faithful and recklessly 
brave, yet adaptable in the highest degi 

These positive virtues are not generally associated 
with adaptability to new conditions, yet the Southern 
people in their hitter experience of defeat have given 
ence of tin- power in its full significant e 

The men and women of our country had. during the 
slave-holding period, fulfilled so many varying and 
incongruous duties to their slaves that they were in a 
are fitted for any labor. The first lesson thai a 
litt le Southern girl learned, in preparation of her du- 
ties a- mistress of a plantation, was In ation, 
usually developing into a warm friendship, with the 
maid of her own age, who was generally given by the 
mother of the negro to " he some sarvice to little nois- 
sie," a sort of counterpart to the "body servant " whom 
the recent dialect stories have made so familiar to our 
non-slaveholding neighbors. Although the peculiar 

relations of things made this intimacy less 
tween master and man, the love which began in their 
early youth ripened generally into a hearty affection 
which usually was lifelong, beginning, as it did, with 
their childish games in the negro quarter. 

THE NEGRO QUARTER. 

It is doubtful if there was ever a tern defen< 
tractive to a child as this same "quarter," a collection 
of small dwellings built on each side of a street, and 
inhabited by children of a larger growth who were 
prodigal of stories tla\ ored by the faith of tie 
There were friendly yellow dons; chicken-, milled, 
muffled and duck-legged, which answered to names, 
with callow broods racing after them, and wonderful 
hens' nests full of eggs in unfrequented corners; tires 
in tin' open air with fat sweel potatoes roasting in their 
ashes; doll hahv gardens planted and torn up at once 
by a multitude of little coffee-colored playmates who 
scampered about "little missus" in a frenzy of delight. 

Mistress and maiden confided everything to each 
other, and their mutual affection stood the mistress in 
good stead in her after life and enabled her often to 
penetrate the interesting but bewildering tangle of 
•■ tergiversations" which the plantation m ro calls bis 
thoughts. Experience taught her the habit of their 
minds, and opened to her the genuine dialect of a 
thousand idioms which she would afterward have to 
use in instructing her slaves. It also initiated her into 
the African standards of right and wrong, by which 
-he gauged the depth of the offender's culpability. 

There, too. she learned the potentiality of sarcasm 
in dealing with a race so alive to a sense of the ludi- 



74 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



crous that an appeal to its risibles will often answer 
the purpose better than punishment. 

An instance of this kind is given of :i Southern 
woman who cured her negro marketman of bringing 
the family a turkey daily for dinner because he had 
speculated in them and they were cheaper than other 
meat. She invited him t<> "stand on the gallery and 
gobble a little." This ludicrous performance deterred 
him from a repetition of hi- offense when more seri- 
ous remonstrance had proved fruitless. 

HOW SHE ABSORBED II"' SEWIFERY. 

The little girls were present at all the milkings, 
churnings, and even the grinding of meal on the place, 
and so became familiar with the minutiae of these in- 
dusti 

When the young mistress was married the superin- 
ace of these duties devolved upon her — the cur- 
if the meat, which was to form the staple fund of 
the white and black family throughout the year, the 
recipes for which were handed down from mother to 
daughter for generations. As there were no markets. 
chickens and turkeys and ducks and geese must be 

I in plenty; butter must be churned; a g I 

vegetable garden sedulously cultivated; the fruit trees 
and berry vines persuaded to hear fruit after their 
kind ; to overlook the weaving-room, where the cotton 
cloths as well as woolen used to be made, was also her 
duty: and in all these things our grandmothers and 
mothers were as proficient as the chatelaines of the 
Middle Ages. Much of these arts the Southern child 
absorbed without special instruction. Also a part of 
her education was the cutting and sewing of all kinds 
irments. the cooking and serving of all sorts of 
dainties, and the intelligent care of the sick. 

WELL-READ PLANTATION WOMEN. 

This practical education went hand in hand with 
the elementary and theoretical one under governesses, 
or in the little schools composed of the children of the 
neighboring places. 

Whether this method of mixing the actual with the 
ideal was peculiarly beneficial to their minds, or that 
the loneliness of their lives drove them into more se- 
rious studies, it is remarkahle how many well-read 
women there were on these river places whose famil- 
iarity with the classics was close enough to be loving, 
and whose skill in the tinkling music of their day was 
of no mean proficiency. 

So well was their capacity and attainments recog- 
nized that the distinguished American historian of 
this century. Mr. Bancroft, declined a wager with a 
Southern lady about a literary ipiestion, sayin.tr : "1 
have been told to beware of the plantation woman 
she reads so many honks she will prove me in the 
wrong." 

As the Southern woman developed into maturity. 

dividing her time between her studies and observation 

of the busy life around her, she read in the daily prac- 

ofher elders the constantly repeated lesson of her 

duty to her sable dependents. 

()n the plantation it was not a question of cottage 
visiting, such as is common in English and New En- 
gland country life. It was the actual care of an irre- 
Bjponsible family, large and often refractory enough to 
dampen the zeal of the most philanthropic. 

There were clothes to be made for the babies and 
little children, and as well for the "orphans," the shift- 
less bachelors and motherless hoys and girls who would 



not sew if they could. Then the seamstresses who 

were to do this work wen- to be trained from the man- 
ner of holding a needle and scissors through all the 
various kind- of Btitches to be taken up to dressmak- 
ing 

There were waiter-, waitresses and dairy maids to 
instruct and cooks to superintend. Also there must 
be many of these -killed servants, because, without 
exception, they all had families, and if one of these 
should be taken ill another servant must be taken out 
of the field to supply the parent's place in the house, 
so that the child might be properly attended and the 
mother'.- heart at ease. , 

The fallacy that those darky servants grew like 
blackberries on the briers belongs to that land of 
Cockagne where roasted pigeons fell from the sky. 
Certainly these self-producing prodigies did not exist 
for our mothers. It will be only after a long and care- 
ful course of training, with mutual forbearance and 
patience, that the free negro will make as accomplished 
a servant as our slaves were. 

TRUTH ABOUT WHII'I'lMiS AND SELLINGS. 

'I'he extreme penalty of whipping was reserved for 
such offenses as stealing and other crimes. As the ne- 
groes could not be " discharged without a character.'' 
the mistress was not armed with the terror always in 
the hands of the modern housewife, hut she had to 
make the best of her husband's negroes as she found 
them, trusting to her own powers as educator to form 
of the young ones such servants as she would like to 
have about her. 

To sell one of the negroes "horn on the place" was 
an evidence of the direst poverty of the master or of 
the most heinous conduit on the part of the slave. 

Such peccadilloes as insubordination, untidiness or 
stupidity formed no reason to the mind of either mis- 
tress or maid in the " Old South " for a dissolution of 
their mutual relation; nor could a tormented mistress 
find relief by giving a useless servant her freedom. 

There is an authentic story of one who tried, during 
a visit to the North, to thus rid herself of a drunken 
maul whose taste for Madeira had tempted her to run 
up a score on her mistress' account at the neighboring 
'drinking shop. When the mistress remonstrated the 
negro answered her that being a "quality darky" she 
could hardly hi' expected to get drunk on whisky 
"like poorwhite trash," and that as far as her " free 
papers" were concerned she would have none of them. 
There was no use talking, she was "master's nigger," 
and he would have to support her as long as she lived. 
There was no recourse but to submit, and the maid 
continued to follow her own sweet will until her free- 
dom was forced upon her by the war. This was no 
singular or isolated case. 

WITTICISMS OF CHILDREN. 



Aside from the leading topics in this journal, indi- 
cated by its name, a department will he created for 
the bright and funny sayings of children. Request 
is now made for such contributions. Mr. Otis S. Tar- 
ver, of Sanford, Fla., sends this note: 

"The Hon. I. W. Newman, C. V., was presented last 
Sunday morning with a fine baby girl. His other 
daughter, a four-year-old, on seeing the little stranger, 
says, ' Mama, less call her Winnie Davis.' You see the 
name will last, and let us build the monument all to- 
gether, and build it soon. Otis S. Tarver." 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 
REGARD OF BRAVE MEN FOR THEIR PEERS. THE GRAY AND THE BLUE. 



75 



REMARKABLE TRIBUTE OF A CONFEDERATE TO THE 
LATE COL. SAM WALKER, OF KANSAS. 



Kansas City Journal: The testimony contained in 
this letter could only come from a man whose bravery 
makes him indeed a competent judge of the soldierly 
qualities of the man of whom he writes: 

To the Editor of the Journal : I have just read in the 
Journal of the 14th inst. an account of the early life of 
the late Col. Sam Walker. I would write a letter of 
condolence and sincere sympathy to his family it' 1 
knew whom to address, not that such letters amount 
generally to anything, hut it might lie some satisfac- 
tion to them to know that one who differed so widely 
from Col. Walker in everything save his loyalty to 
what he thought right should express his admiration 
for his magnificent courage as a soldier and pay a 
tribute t<> his memory, for no braver heart ever heat 
under the uniform of any soldier of any country than 
that of the gallant Sam Walker. 

Serving in the Confederate Army, the fortune- ol 
war threw the regiment to which 1 belonged so often 
in contact with walker's, the Fifth Kansas, of which 
he was Major at that tune, that we almost felt as if we 
had a speaking acquaintance, hut our attentions to 
each other were always conducted through t he muzzles 
of six-shooters or the edge of sabres. 1 will carry to 
my grave the mark of a pistol ball he gave me when 
we were not five paces apart, and 1 have a letter from 
him, dated twenty-five years after, in which lie says I 
shot out at the same time two locks of his whiskers in 
return. He was then in the lull rigor of his manhood 
and was the greatest glutton for light I ever -aw. The 
proverbial Irishman at tin' Donnybrook fair dragging 
his coat-tail and begging some gentleman to st< p on it. 
wasn't in it with Sam Walker if he had the Fifth 
Kansas at his back. I was a youngster then with just 
down enough on my upper lip to make it look dirty : 
full of snap and fond of excitement, and 1 always tried 
to accommodate him. 

A dozen times or so we were close enough together. 
in just such little melees as above mentioned, to -hake 
hands, hut we never had time exactly to do it. In the 
winter of 1863 1 was sent North to prison, having been 
captured by Maj. Teague, of the Eighth Missouri Ca\ 
airy, and 1 never came in contact with Walker a 
I often thought of him, hut knowing his reckless cour- 
age in battle, naturally concluded he had been killed. 
Some years ago, while visiting Chicago, I gave a gen- 
tleman from Kansas my card with a memorandum on it 
referring to an incident in one of our little "scrapping 
matches.'' which I knew would revive the old soldier- 
memory, and asked that he hand it to him. 1 n a short 
time after I returned home 1 received a kind and 
hearty letter from him, ami after that we kept up a 
correspondence. He was not as handy with a pin as 
he was with a pistol, for frequently I would get two 
and sometimes three letters in on him before I would 
get one in reply, a tardiness that could not he charged 
to him in shooting. We exchanged photographs, and 
I prize his even more highly now that he lias gone. 

Farewell, brave Walker. Lightly rest the sod above 
vour fearless heart. Softly blow the breezes of your 
beloved Kansas over your grave is the sincere wish of 
your old antagonist in arms, but friend and admirer in 
peace! B. M. Hoed. 

Nashville, Tmu., February, 1893. 



" We drank from the same canteen." 

war. cruel war! You cause to cut each other's 
throats, those who were horn to he brothers. 

Here is a reminiscence from the stubbornly eon- 
tested battle of Chickamauga: 

Early on Saturday morning preparations were made 
for tlie terrible conflict soon to follow. As the col- 
umns wheeled into line, I tilled my canteen with 
water, replenished my stock of ammunition, and was 
soon ready for the word, "Forward." 

1 saw that grand patriot, true statesman ami brave 
commander, Roger Q. Mills, hurrying to and fro 
among his soldiers, giving them words of encourage- 
ment as well as of command. My company was or- 
dered out with the skirmishers, and we were soon en- 
gaged in a rambling tire. The Federal skirmishers 
soon gave way before US, leaving here and there a dead 
or wounded comrade. I discovered immediately in 
front of me a soldier dressed in blue, prostrate, and 
attempting to rise. He turned his eve- toward me. 
gave the Masonic mlmi of distress, and asked me for 
water. I hastily placed hi- lead on his knapsack, 
l'.i\ ' him my canteen of water, and ran forward to join 
my company. 

The enemy was reinforced and we were driven back 
over the same ground. Again I saw the wounded 
Federal soldier and stooped over him a moment ''to 
hear what he might say." As near as I can remember 
these were his word- " Brother, something tells me 
that we will live through this battle, and that we will 
some day meet again." 

I clasped his hand and hastily joined my command. 
My fellow -soldiers furnished me water during that 
fearful day. and at night we re-ted where water was 
plentiful. 

All know how the battle terminated, and the result 
of the war. Afterward I made mv wax to Texas, mar- 
ried, and began anew tic battle of life. I often 
thought of my brother in blue, hut twenty years 
passed before I heard of him i me day while peru 
a newspaper my eyes fell upon the following item: 

"If the Confederate soldier belonging to company 
A of the Fifteenth Texas, who gave a wounded Federal 
soldier a canteen of water during the battle of Chick- 
amauga. will write me at Hotel. New Orleans, he 

will learn something of interest to him. 

"John Randolph." 

I wrote immediately and received a telegram to go 
to New < M leans at once. 

I had had a hard struggle in life, and could not well 
afford to spare t he time or the money necessary for the 
trip; hut upon reflection I determined to go; indeed, 
I felt that it was my duty to obey the summons, and. 
after hasty preparations, I borrowed the expense 
money and went to New Orleans. 

I arrived at the Hotel about 2 o'clock, regis- 



76 



C( >NFEDERATE VETERAN. 



tered.and inquired for Randolph. Theclerk informed 
me that such a man was there, bul confined to his 
room and in the la-t stages of consumption. I asked 
i" be shown to bis room. I was met at the door by ;i 
middle-aged gentleman, who invited me into the 
room. On the bed a gray-haired man was reclining, 
who at my approach held out his hand and scrutinized 
my features intently. I was invited to a seat, and the 
sick man requested me to relate the circumstance 
heretofore mentioned, which I did. He listened at- 
t( ntively, and, when the narrative was concluded, he 
requested his companion to bring from a wardrobe in 
the room a canteen. It was old and worn, but on the 
cover was plainly marked, "J. W. T., Co. A.. 15 Tex." 
I recognized ii as the same thai 1 had Left with the 
wounded United States soldier during the battle of 
Chickama uga 

"Is this your canteen?" t lie sick man inquired. 

I told him that it once was mine, but that 1 had 
given it to him. 

"1 now return your property," he said, and, 'clasp- 
ing my ha in I. he feebly ejaculated, " My brother! " 

For a few moments all was quiet, then he intro- 
duced me t'i In- companion as his " other brother." 
He requested his brother to ring tor the porter, and, 
when he arrived, senl him with a message. In a shorl 
time another person arrived, and my friend requested 
him to draw a draft in my favor on 'tlic hank for ten 
thousand dollars, and directed him to pay the same 
on presental ion. 

W'iin 'In- banker had gone, my friend explained 
that In- hail prospered since tin- war ami was now rich, 
ami could give me this amount without injustice to 
his "other brother," having already provided for him, 
hi- only living relative. His brother approved the 
act, and when all was again quiet, my friend coughed 
feebly, closed his eyes, ami slepl tin- sleep that knows 
no waking. Without a struggle tin- breath hail left 
his body. 

We placed tin- remains in a metallic casket, and, 
in charge of his brother, they were senl to Illinois for 
interment, there to sleep until tin- last great trump 
shall sound ami assemble thejusl ami true in one im- 
mense army under tin 1 blood stained banner of Prince 
1 iiimanui-1. 'I'll i: ( ; ray. 

MONUMENTS To USION SOLDIERS. 



STORY OF GEN. SHERMAN. 



\l.\i. II. Ai; INTERVIEW AT JACKSON, HISS. 



In seeking information a- to what has been expend- 
ed for monuments by tin- United States < rovernment, 
Gen. Marcus J. Wright, who had been addressed be- 

of his long connection with the War Records 

Office, wrote: "It would afford me very greal pleasure 
to serve you, hut to obtain the information you ask 
for in regard to monuments erected by the United 
States Government would take weeks of laborious 
work. Every act of Congress making appropriations 
for monuments would have to he found, as this is the 
only correct source of information. 1 will be glad to 
aid you if in my power." 



" Yes, Joseph 1-'.. Johnston had crossed Pearl River 

on his retreat to the East, and it was known that 
Sherman would evacuate Jackson ami pursue him as 
soon a- possible. With greal ditticulty I had secured 
from the federal authorities the assurance that my 
cotton factory would not he burned. But on the night 
when the evacuation was in progress 1 learned from a 
reliable source that a change had been made in the 
orders and that the torch was likely to he applied to 
the property at any moment. 

1 resolved to seek an immediate interview with i Jen. 
Sherman himself entertaining, however, but slender 
hopes, especially at such an untimely hour, for it was 
past midnight, of reaching the presence of the federal 
Chief. 1 ascertained that his headquarters were in 
the residence in West Jackson, and before many 

minutes had passed [was at the front gate of the pi are. 
where 1 > my greal surprise) found no guards to check 
my progress. The house was quiel and unlighted. 

Seeing no one to inquire of 1 opened the gate, went 
up to the house and on to the porch. For some min- 
utes 1 stood there listening. Bul I heard no sound 
within, nor was there any guard to challenge my in- 
trusion. Through a shaded transom 1 caught the re- 
flection of a light. 1 tried the hall door, found it ajar, 
pushed it open, and stepped inside. The plaee was 
silent — there was nothing to indicate occupancy by 
the military. 

" I have come to the wrong house," I said. But ob- 
serving thai a dim lighl was reflected through the half 
open door of a room opening into tin' hall. 1 advanced 
and entered the apartment. It had hut a single occu- 
pant. He was sleeping upon a lounge ami my steps 
aroused him. lie tinned over and looked at me. 

" What do you want ?" he demanded. 
" I want to see (leu. W. T. Sherman." 
" I'm (Jen. Sherman. What do you want '.'" 
" I explained as briefly as possible. He said his or- 
ders were to spare the factory -that they would be 
obeyed then said that In- wanted to go to sleep. He 

stretched himself and shut his eyes, and 1 walked out 
and returned up town. A few hours later the factory 

was in ashes." 

"And you say that Gen. Sherman had no body 
una rd ? " 

"I entered his hedrooniaml left it without being 
challenged. In fact without meeting a soul except 
the ( ieneral himself." 

This remarkable incidenl was told in Green's Bank, 
and the narrator was Joshua Green, its founder and 
President, writes Henry clay Fairman in the Sunny 
South. 

CONFEDERATE DEAD AT MANASSAS. 



Mrs. Alice Trueheart Buck, Washington, D.C.: "The 
battle-field Of Manassas is live miles or more in extent, 
and the dead were consequently much scattered. 
Many graves have been entirely lost sight of. The 
people iii that .section have been poor since the war, 
and it has been with great difficulty that anything has 
been rescued or preserved The ladies raised a small 
fund for a monument, but not until the State of Vir- 
ginia donated $1,000 was one built. It is within the 
village of Manassas, and in sight from the railroad. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



77 



The monument is paid for, Imt the grounds are unim- 
proved and very desolate in appearance. Just before 
the monument was built, several years ago. at which 
time all the Confederate dead were gathered and placed 
under it in one grave, the writer and her husband vis- 
ited the old burying-ground and copied from the much 
worn wooden boards and headstones the following 
names: S. 1). Jones, Co. I. South Carolina Regiment ; 
W. Corbin, South Carolina Regiment; Lieut. D. W. 
Pitts, Fourth Alabama Volunteers; S. J. Matthews, J. 
D. Robbins, Fourth Alabama Regiment; W. Cambra, 
Co. E, Hampton's Legion; Sergt. L. C. Gatch, Fourth 
Alabama Regiment: L. Roby, Adams, W. J. Brown, 
Co. I, First Mississippi Regiment; YV. D. Dennis, Co, 
]•;. Ninth Mississippi Regiment; J. E. Butts, R. Ste- 
vens, Second Mississippi Regiment; !•'. Broome, W. T. 
Foy, killed July 21, 1861 ; W. T. E. Ralls, Eighth Lou- 
isiana Volunteers, died Aug. 16, 1861, and has a mar- 
ble slab erected by the Masons; L. A. Bliss, J. B. 
Moouse or Monroe, G. G. Martin. Eighth Georgia Reg 
iment ; \V. II. Evera, W. A. Lacosia, Ninth South Car- 
olina Regiment ; G. A. Derrick, First Texas Regiment, 
marble slab at his grave by Masons. There were many 
marked "Unknown." There is nothing sadder than 
an unknown soldier's grave, except the living who are 
unhonored. 

ADVOl VI INCJ SOI I 1IIKN LITERATURE. 

In her zeal for the South. Mrs. Buck submits a pre- 
amble and resolutions : 

"Whereas, it having been the custom in the South 
sinee t lie war. from necessity at first, afterward from 
force n I habit, to depend upon other sections and coun- 
tries lor all manufactured articles, including literature, 
and. believing this course to be hurtful and obstruc- 
tionary to our progress and independence as a people, 

we would call attention to the fad and seek a remedy. 

Nothing succeeds without organized effort; therefore 
be it resolved, 

"That we will Support Southern publications and 
publishing houses, since we now have them equal to 
those found elsewhere 

"That we will use our best efforts for the upbuilding 
of Southern literature and education, without which 
we can never be independent or prosperous " 



loved and honored Hampton (derided now by the sans 
' 8 and ingrates), the battalion dwindled back 
to one company, " The Carolina Rifles," whose mem- 
bers now send you erecting, and wish you success, by 
the memory of the " Rebel yell." 



THE CAROLIXA RIFLES. 



James G. Holmes, of Charleston, w ho served in the 
Sixth South Carolina Cavalry, gives an interesting 
history of the Carolina Rifles, many of whom are sub 
scribers to the Cosi i derate Veteran. 

This company is composed of young men. but the 
honorary and reserve members are old Confederate 
veterans. The company was organized in 1869 as the 
"Carolina Rifle club" President Grant would not 
permil military companies in South Carolina at that 
time, and as the Slate was in the hands of the carpet 
baggers ami scalawags, we chose as the motto for the 
flag presented to us by the ladies, "Patrin wfilkiji 
as being most appropriate. Nominally we organized 
for target practice, but actually to protect our women 
and children; and as we were armed with Winchester 
rifles, and most of us were old soldiers, the community 
felt a sense of security not felt before or since the war 
had ended. In 1876 the company, or club, of neces 
sity grew into a battalion of three full companies, but 
after the beneficent rule of the State's savior, our 



SOMKTHISG TOO GOOD TO BE LOST." 



[H. J. Leovy, in New Orleans, La., Picayune, Februarj 16th.] 
As the question of the authorship of tic ver.-es, 

"Lines on the back of a Confederate Note." is again 

being discussed, 1 inclose you a slip cut from a paper 
some time ago, which shows, beyond doubt, that Mai. 
S. A. Jonas is entitled to the credit. The extract is 
from a letter written by Map Jonas himself. The fol- 
lowing is the extract, and also the copy of the famous 
\ erses, a- tv\ i>, d bv tic author: 

"Lush furnished us each with one of these, upon 
which to win.'. We all complied with his wishes. 
each writing a compliment or a sentiment, and my 
blank was tilled in with the lines in question. 

"The original copy of the note, a few months later, 
fell into the hands of the editor of the Metropolitan 
d, of New York, who published it under the head- 
ing, ' Something Too Good to he Lost,' and this was its 
first appearance in print, for its author's appreciation 
of it was ha-, d entirely upon that of the world that so 
kindly recei \ ed it. 

"The first person, except the author, who ever read 
it was your gallant fellow citizen, ('apt. A. B. Snell, 

the commander of Cleburne's sharps] ters, whose 

criticism was passed upon the lines before they were 
copied upon the note. I append a correct copy. This 
is. I think, the fourth time within the last twenty 
yen- that i In- controversy has trenched upon your 
columns ami good nature, but on the other occasions 
the corrections were made by outsiders." 

LINES WRITTEN ON THE BAI K 01 \ CONFEDERATE NOTE. 

Representing nothing on God's earth now. 

And naught in tin- watt is bi low it. 
As the pledge of a Nat on that's .lead ami gone, 

Keep it, dear friend, and show it. 
Show it to those who will lend an eat 

To the tale that this trifle can tell. 
01 :i liberty born of the' patriot's dream, 

Of a storm-cradled Nation thai fell. 

--.ss th.' precious ores, 
\ nd too much of a strangi i to borrow, 

We issued to-day Our premise to pay, 

And hoped to redeem on the morrow. 
The da\ s rolled by and weeks aid weeks became years, 
But our coffers wen- empty stil!; 

Com was s.i rare that I he treasury'*! quake 
If a dollar should drop in the till. 

Buf the fail h that was in us was strong indeed, 

And our poverty we I we discerned, 
And this little check represented the pay 

That our suffering veterans earned. 

We know it had hardly a value in gold, 

Y. t as gold each soldier reel LVed it , 
It I azed in our eyes with a promise to psj . 

And each southern patriot believed it. 

But our hoys thought little of price or of pay, 

( )r of hills thai wet.- overdue ; 
We knew if it lionghl usourbrtad to-day, 

'Twas the best our poor country could do. 
Keep it ; it tells all our history over, 

From the birth of the dream to its last; 
Modest, and horn of the angel, Hope. 

Like our hope of success, it passed. 
Richmond, Va.. May, 1885. S. A. Jonas. 



78 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



COMMUNICATIOXS FROM VETERANS AND OTHERS. 



Richard W. Miller, Richmond, Kv\: "Will you 
kindly tdl me what States have made provision for 
the disabled < 'onfederate soldiers, and what States pay 
pensions ti i said soldi) 

A similar request comes fr Hon. D. E. Simmons, 

a member of the Texas Legislature. Will friends si nd 
the Veteran information on this important subject? 

Capt. A. T. Gay, Graham, Tex. : "Our Camp is not 
a large one. This i ounty was a wilderness during the 
war, and has been Bettled since 1875, and Confederates 
here hail from every State in the South and represent 
almost every battle-field fought under the stars and 
liars: and could you lie with us in some of our re- 
unions and listen at the tales of valor told by these 
hoys in gray, it would do you good. Our Camp sent 
up, through Gen. Cabell, something near -Sinn mure 
than two years ago to aid in building the grandest 
monument to be erected in commemoration of the 
grandest name on the pages of American history — the 
leader of a people \\ ho has few equals and no superiors 
in ancient or modern times. Having served in the 
Thirty-first Tennessee Infantry under Stewart and 
Strahl, 1 have a right to speak in behalf of Tennessee 
Confederate soldiers. Send along the Confederate 
Veteran ; we like the name." 



K. F. Peddicord, Palmyra, Mo.: "In the Confede- 
rate Veteran for February I see many incidents and 
name- that bring to memory freshly again fine forms, 
beaming faces and gallant hearts, and while I muse 
the silent tear upstarts, and memory brings again ' the 
hours that were.' Permit me to place in your care 
some line- on ' Pickles and Meal ' for forty-three days, 
of which your correspondent, Capt. J. I.. Lemon, of 
Acworth, Ga., makes mention in his article of 'Six 
Hundred Confederate Officers,' who were exposed to 

Confederate ean i. You see (hey were copied at 

Fort Delaware June 5, 1865. On reading Capt. Lem- 
on's communication, I was reminded of this copy. 
The writer, with others in the officers' quarters, was 
at the gate when these same veterans arrived. Many 
of them were carried in on stretchers. These verses, 
among others, were produced and sung at an enter- 
tainment given in ' Mess Hall ' at Fort Delaware for 
the benefit of these ' badly used up' ' Hilton Headers,' 
and strange to relate we n id present the commandant, 
Gen. A. Schoefe, and members of his staff. One of the 
returned prisoners, brought in on stretchers, was a 
gallant lieutenant of Morgan's cavalry, from Lexing- 
ton, Ky. The brave veteran was almost dead, and as 

we gathered around to greet him, his eye- filled with 
tears at the sight of his old comrades, and he said, 
•Never mind, hoy-: I will tell Gen. Breckinridge all 

about our inhuman treatment ;" and this threat seemed 

to give him relief." 

Here is pari of a letter from away off in Michigan: 
''1 believe the elements oi success are within your 
grasp. Von have an opportunity: you have experi- 
ence; there i- a place for the VETERAN, and subject 
matter to make it a voice of the South. Let it he your 
mission to secure the cherished traditions and facts of 
the men and women of the 'lost cause' who enriched 
the world with history and memories to make the 
Smith and the cause that made an army of veterans 



famous — a fame that will live till the records of the 
world perish. 1 rejoice that you are a recorder, hut 
ht me sound a word of warning into your editorial 

ear. Be just; be generous; he true: avoid the bitter- 
ness and brutality "f exceptional horrors. We have 
-ecu tin- wreck of too many partisan magazines, while 
all will hail ami support one from a fixed point of 
\iew in defense of a cause and people that commanded 
the admiration of the world. You know that the gift 
of imagination is highly developed in such a struggle 
a- w i. passed through, and often a little personal suf- 
fering seemed too hard to endure, and the repetition 
of that suffering often magnified ten-fold through dif- 
ferent relators. We had enough of the waters of bit- 
terness during the flood of sorrow. Now , alter a quar- 
ter of a century, let the calm, sad voice of history give 
simply the truth. It has come, not as we expected, 
hut in Cod's own way. and every deed of valor is a 
gem in the crown of veterans. Seek the gems, and 
avoid the alloy, and you will do the South enduring 
honor. The first thought I had when made aware of 
your intention was, I low can I help the VETERAN? 
If I can .lo -o. it will contribute to my happiness, and 
my effort is at your disposal without money or price. 
I want no favor, only to lend you personally a helping 
hand in a cause I love." 



The following letter is used without signature. It 
is so manifestly private that the signature will he ex- 
cused. The lady who wrote it is of a distinguished 
family, and her father was so strong an abolitionist 
that he liberated his dozen slaves, and moved North 
before the dire struggle. While she has ever been 
loyal to the Union, her personal relation to the family 
of the South's chieftain has been closely intimate for 
many years: 

".Memphis, February, 1893. I am delighted with 
tic Confederate Veteran, and herein inclosed you 
will find an order for several subscriptions. I think 
it is just the paper needed; and, although my senti- 
ments and principles during the war -and as firmly 
now as then -are opposite to my friends, yet they 
fought foi- principle, as they conceived it, as firmly as 
1 did for my convictions. They fought with weapons 
that kill tiie body; 1 with the weapons whose use 
make us understand how intolerant our own sex is 
when we dare differ with them. Vet, I honor the 

brave women whose love of the cause gave them the 
strength ' to do and dare' everything in its mainten- 
ance. I am a southern woman, ami my heart's affec- 
tion went out to IIIV people. Scarce would tile -llotlt 

of joy for a Federal victory die upon my lips, when 
the agrony of heart, as I thought of the fallen heroes 
of my own sunny southland, overpowered me. And 
thus sentiment and principle went hand in hand 
through the conflict, though, thank God, in all action 
I was able to maintain my principle. Well, why did 
I allow myself t" say all this? 

"I will do all 1 can for the circulation of your paper, 
not only for the kindliness towards yourself engen- 
dered, first, by my knowledge of your perfect self- 
abnegation where the comfort of others was concerned, 
hut as a mean- of making the monument what it 
should he. It will he erected to Mr. Davis' memory, 
and were it made of gold anil precious stones it would 
not be beyond his deserts. I admired him for his per- 
fect adherence to principle, his noble self sacrifice in 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



79 



the cause he deemed best for his people, his kindness 
of heart, which added a charm to his courtly hearing. 
Of course, this monument will stand for the 'princi- 
ple' as well as the man who made its maintenance 
possible so long. Mr. Davis was among the greatest 
of the world's heroes. Thank God, thai he lived to 
show the world how a Christian gentleman could meet 
its contumely even as he had its plaudits! As 1 knew 

Mr. Davis, I loved him so entirely because I trusted 
him so implicitly. 

"I had a letter from Mr. Hayes this morning. Mag- 
gie is visiting her mother in New York, and reports 
both Mrs. Davis and Winnie well. Mrs. Davis seems 
much annoyed at the difficulty she finds in getting 
any money out of her publishers, and not having the 
jiower to contrail with others. What a hard time 
women have in business matters. 1 hope the coming 
woman will have more necessary information." 



Mrs. Mary E. Diekison, wife of Gen. .1. .1. Dickison, 
Commander of I'. C. V.'s in Florida, Ocala, February 

L'7th: "The CONFEDERATE VETERAN greeted us some 

time in January, and was cordially welcomed by each 
member of our home circle. Your old comrades will 
not hail it with more enthusiasm than the ladies of 
our dear south la ml : and, as an evidence of this fact, 1 
made it my pleasant duty to aet as an '' aide de camp " 
and solicit the patronage of several friends, who have 
honored me by a prompt response. We are truly 
grateful to you for enlisting in so noble a work. Hav- 
ing failed to provide true histories to.be used as text- 
books in our schools, may it be the mission of the CON- 
FEDERATE Veteran to supply this great want to our 
southern homes, that the rising generation may honor 
the principles of their noble fathers, and emulate their 
example by walking proudly in the same paths. 
As other names are added, I will forward promptly. 
May a grand success crown your efforts, for su< 
means the preservation of our honor in the vindica- 
tion of the principles for which more than three hun- 
dred thousand noble patriots laid down their lives 
The sacred memories of sublime devotion that cluster 
around the 'lost cause' must V perpetuated. < Mir cause 
was just, and we will glorify it in song and story. 
The sanctum of the Confederate Vi 1 1 i; v\ will soon 
be invaded by 'Diekison and his men.' Be ready to 
give the gallant command a welcome." 



Will Watkins, Paducah, Ky., February 16th: "The 
February number of the Confederate Veteran has 

reached me. and with it came a cloud of miserable re- 
collections of the past; but when I had perused its 
honored and ever to be eherished contents, that cloud 
Of past memories Suddenly became sunshine, and I 
cheerfully realize the profound fact that those heroic 
veterans of the Southern ( 'oufederacy have not forgot- 
ten the listless and sacred dust of those immortal spir- 
its. Sir, allow me to tell you upon this sheet of paper, 
which is moist with tears from my own eyes, that this 
publication of yours carries me back to 1861, and tells 
me of one very dear to me, and of one who kissed me 
for the last time with mortal lips. It was father that 
hid mother and me adieu, and it was for the balance 
of our days. His whispering spirit tells us that yon- 
der at Shiloh mingles his remains with the sacred 
dust of some of the bravest fathers and sons that ever 
wrote the bloody declaration of Confederate rights. 



Yes. I feel honored, because I know that my family is 
honored by the dust of at least one battlefield. 

" Paducah is a beautiful city of twenty-two thousand 
inhabitants, among whom are' a goodly number of ex- 
Confederate soldiers, t" say nothing of the surround- 
ing country, which is yet alive with them. Send a, 
lew copies of your March number: I will do all in my 
power to advance your interests in this part of the 
Kentucky purchase. Address, care of the Standard." 



Till: CONFEDERATE CABINET. 



Of the ( on federate ( 'a Id net an exchange says: 

When the Confederate Government was first organ- 
ized, Feb, 18, 1861, the Cabinel was composed of Robert 

Toombs, Secretary of Slate; ('. (i. Mcniminger. Secre- 
tary of the Treasury; I.. Pope Walker. Secretary of 
War; Stephen Mallory .Secretary of the Navy ; Attor- 
ney General, Judah P. Benjamin; Postmaster General, 
John II. Reagan. Mr. Toombs was succeeded shortly 
bv R, M. T. Hunter; and mi Walker's resignation in 
August, 1861, Mr. Benjamin became Secretary of War, 
while Thomas Watts became Attorney General. In 
1862 Benjamin became Secretary of State, and G. W. 
Randolph succeeded him in the War Department, for 
a short time only. In November James A. Seddon 
look the War portfolio; in l863George Davis succeed- 
ed Mr. Watts a- Attorney General; and in 1864 G. A. 
Trenholm became Secretary of the Treasury, [n Jan- 
uary, 1865, Secretary Seddon resigned, and Gen. -I. C. 
Breckinridge was appointed in his place When Rich- 
mond fell. President Davis' Cabinet was composed of 
these men : Acting Secretary of State and Postmastl I 
General, John II. Reagan; Sei retary of War. John ( '. 
Breckinridge; Secretary of the Treasury, George A. 
Trenholm : Secretary of the Navy, Stephen IJ. Mallory ; 
Attorney General, George Da\ i-. 



.1. W. Simmons. Mexia, Texas, while -ending a club, 
asks for the extra Copy 1" be sent to a veteran with 

but one arm left, and adds: " I was deeply interested 

in reading and living over again those eventful days 
of 'I'd to 'Co. The name of your city. Nashville. I 
fails to bring fresh to my memory the battle scenes 

that I witnessed around there. When our army was 
driven from there in great confusion. 1 had to run 
through that old muddy field to prevent taking a trip 
to Camp Chase." 

render Bros., Bryson City, N.C.: "Mrs. D. K.Col- 
lins handed us Vol. 1, No. '_'. Confederate Veti ran. 

After examination, by her request, we have placed an 
advertisement and called attention, local and editorial. 
We will be glad to assist you in this cause. ( Mir father, 
I!. H . render, was m i be Executive Department, C. S. ; 
Uncle David Pender, Commissary, Eastern North Car- 
olina: Uncle W, Dorsey Pender, Lieutenant Colonel, 
I . S. A., resigned, entered ( '. S. A. as private, wounded 
as Brig. Gen. W. D. render (from which he died) at 
the second day's tight at Gettysburg. (Mil's has been 
a warlike generation — 177<'>, 1812, Mexican and Indian 
wars and later." * * * 



[Lampassas, Tex., Dispatch.] 

Through the kindness of Judge Thomas we have 
had the pleasure of perusing No. 2, Vol. 1. Every 
Confederate soldier should become a subscriber to this 
excellent journal. 



So 



C( INFEDERATE VETERAN. 



i'hc (fcmfcdcviitc Vctcvan. 

Fifty Onts a Year. S. A. CUNNINGHAM. Editor 

Office ;it Thi \!H' rlcan, Corner Church and Cherry Sts. 

Tin* publication ie ; i properly of s. A. < unnlng 

Monev f >:• i • 1 for it does nol augment the Monument Fund directly, 

in auxiliary IU i m certainly makes It eminently worthy 

the patronage of everj Mend of the cause. 

GIVE THE OLD SLA VE .1 HOME. 



It is consistent with the spirit of the Confederate 
Vi ii i; an to introduce and advocate a measure which 
will surprise, but 1 trust please, our besl people. It is 
t<> give homes to the old negroes who were slaves for 
twenty years. This project has had earnest considera- 
tion. It has been submitted to friends who have 
l>"u ued and smiled alternately, the frown coming first. 
ope widens upon reflection, and the good that 
would come of it, while being much more beneficial 
to the South than the North, would hardly bring a 
tithe of benefits, in a sectional sense, to what lias been 
enjoyed on the other side. The pensions annually 
arc now about $190,000,000, and distributed in large 
proportion at the Ninth. This act of benevolence 
toward a people whose bondage existed for twenty 
years or more, would be a tax upon the Government 
of say $60,000,000, but it would be once for all. The 

plan contemplates an appropriation of $200 to 1 x- 

pended for land and *100 with which to build a resi- 
dence for every male and female who served as a slave 
for twenty years previous to Lincoln's emancipation 
proclamation, Feb. 22, 1865, provided he or she has 
never been pensioned and has never held any position 
under the pay of the Government. 

The suggested conditions of this benefaction are that 
the $200 be expended for land so cheap that it will 
buy not less than ten aires. It may he as low as they 
can find it. The right to sell said land should be de- 
nied them for ten years. These sums should be in- 
vested through white commissioners not interested in 
the lands, and should he selected by the county courts, 
or similar authorities, to serve without compensation, 
the presumption being that g 1 men would cheerful- 
ly and faithfully lender these services gratuitously. 
The beneficiary should, of course, in all eases, have 
the option as to details of investment. Where these 

ex-slaves own homes, if they reside upon the land 
they should be allowed to invest the residence appro- 
priation of $100 in additional land. 

The foregoing is in brief the plan commended. 
Meditation will show, in an amazing degree, the bene- 
fits of such jbenevolence on the part of the Govern- 
ment, 'fine, the benefits would inure specifically to 
the Southern people, white as well as black. On many 
a count rv plate interests are largely identical. The 
white folks having maintained these old black people, 
and would do so anyhow. It would enable many 
whites to provide more liberally for them than they 
ever have done. It would induce many darkies to 



remove from dingy suburbs of cities and towns to the 

9 

open and healthier atmosphere of the country. It 
would tend to increased respect of the younger negroes 
for their ancestry, thereby strengthening one of the 
commandments. 

A plea for our old black people is deservedly 
pathetic. Who among us does not feel genuinely 
kind to the old darky on whose lips "Massa" 
and " Mistis " are still heard with musical euphony?' 
Who among us, passing that period of their lives when 
many of them had hard task-masters, does no1 recall 
with an everlasting gratitude that, during the four 
years of war. thousands of them were loyal, to the last 
degree, to the dependent members of thej'amily whose 
protectors wen in the war'.' Why. if the great Gov- 
ernment to which we all bear allegiance should refuse 
them the benevolence herein suggested, it would be 
fitting for the Southern people, themselves, robbed by 
the Government of billions of money in holding them 
as lawful property, to undertake aprovision of this kind. 

Republicans, on the other side, cannot afford to 
oppose this measure. Their partisan representatives, 
years ago, before the Southern people had recovered 
from the great disaster to theit estates, promised " forty 
acres and a mule" to these identical persons. 

The principles of I lemocracy are not observed in this 
plea, hut the peculiar exigencies ol' the ease should 
excuse the digression. It is a broad charity to a class 
whose simple, unfailing faithfulness, though not strict 
as to chicken roosts, merits the unstinted liberality of 
the American people. A distinguished Teiines.-ean, 
and Democratic official, who limps from the effect of 
a federal bullet, said, " If not Democratic it is Con- 
federate." 

Two articles have been furnished on this subject by 
request — one by Wm. M. Green, whose father. Rev. 
Dr. A. L. P. Green, though a man of large means, 
owned lint two slaves, and bought I hem to gratify 
them, as he had quibbles about slavery, and the other 
by Mr. Edward E. Young, whose father gave up his 
life for the cause of the Smith, and who is now engaged 
in the material development of Tennessee. 



In the early twilight of a spring morning a few \ ea re 
ago, when the train stopped at Calera, Ala., a feeble 
old lady who was at the station started to enter the 
train, and was unable to ascend the steps. Seeing her 
predicament, l stepped from the platform and assisted 
her. When the train was under way for Montgomery 
she was anxious to manifest her appreciation of 
my kindness, she said her name was Yancy, and to 
inv question of whether her husband was related to 
William I.. Yancy, she said, " lie was that man." 
Arising, removing my hat and extending my hand, 
I said that notwithstanding the abuse of Mr. Yancy 
I wanted the honor of knowing his wife. Her re- 
sponse was as peculiar as the former remark, and with 
measured tone, in pathetic emphasis, she said, " NO' 
man knew my husband I " 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



8 1 



THE NATIONAL SPIRIT. 



S. D. McCormick, Henderson. Ky. : "I have received 
a sample copy of the Confederate Veteran, and am 
delighted with its tone. It has the ring of patriotism 
which the country will applaud. It is national in 
sentiment, yet true to the traditions and the sacrifices 
of the South. You have a noble theme, a great oppor- 
tunity, and you have launched your barque to a pro- 
pitious breeze. I believe you address a universal want, 
North and Sooth. Tin World is interested in thestory 
of the South. Let it be told; lei it be shown that the 
southern people are as national as those of the North ; 
that the Civil War was the 'lash of opinion on a con- 
stitutional construction. The di cision was against the 
South; it hows to the decree; bu1 we deny that its 
people were alienated from the principles o'f the Fed 
era! Constitution, which was made by common fathers, 
wdio themselves differed upon the interpretation of 
the powers and functions of the organic law. Tin' 
quarrel which these builders of the constitution com- 
menced, it was reserved for their posterity to ad 
just. This, in brief, is the philosophy of the ( 'nil 
War. The details .>i tin great struggle pertain to our 
Nation's glory, it is your function to show the side 
of the South. You have approached the subject in a 
proper spirit. In a few years, like the great constitu- 
tional struggle of England, the names .if 1 >.u is and ot 
Lincoln, of I, ee and of ( tranl will he the common her- 

itage of the American i pie. and the very terms North 

and South will he forgotten in a mingled admiral 

of the heroism and mutual sacrifices of tin Anglo- 
American race. Still, while we honor and love the 
people of the South, at the same time we ask the equal 
right to honor the spirit of the North, which also 
poured out its treasures and its blood to maintain, like 
the South, a constitutional construction 
of a Fill, ml unity. Appomattox, as we judge it. was 
the interpretation of the pow ? ers incorporated in the 
constitution of L789. It ought to he pardonable in 
any citizen to rise above sectional pride and a partial 
truth, and to declare the full truth ami the common 
glories of his country." 



/'///: <>i.l> NEGROES AND THE GOVERNMENT. 



I have been thinking for a long time — 1 may -a\ for 
years hack — as to the feasibility or practicability of 
governmental assistance for the old slaves of the South. 
Now. I do mean this, not a- a fancy or wild philan- 
thropy, but an even, properly balanced, long delayed 
dispensation of justice — not an empty honor or a vapid 
promise, but some actual bread and sop from the great 
howl of the Government for the patient but hungry 
black freedman. Can the present administration af- 
ford such a venture? If it should its history will I"' 
glorious. The old planter says, "I am in favor." The 



Confederate soldier says, "Let it he done." The Fed- 
eral soldier says, •• 1 cannot consistently object." The 
bones of Abe Lincoln and Jeff Davis cry aloud. " Be 
just to the old slave." The Government has poured 
its millions and billions into pensions; has paid the' 
Indians for imaginary titles more than a hundred 
millions. The truth is. the red man, as a roving sav- 
age, has ,,,.\ ,.,- Deen ,],,, friend of his white benefactor; 
has dune nothing in converting the wild forest into a 
garden — has actually impeded the march of civiliza- 
tion. II. works not. sutler- no solicitude, and pays 
no taxes, I have reference only to those tribes that 
are the wards of the Government. < in the other hand, 
the negro has been the friend of the white man : has 
bei ii living with him and working for him in North 
America more than two centuries. He has stood by 
his white brother in conquering the wilderness, in 
building cities, in building railroads. With his black 
hands he has furnished re n, lobaCCO and 

cotton to the millions in America and Europe. He 
prefers to remain near the habitation of the white 
man. and will nevei mless by fori e or deception. 

He realizes his dependence, and, under the direction 
of the while man, is industrious and religious; hut, 
when set off to himself, becomes a barbarian and a 
bond. His freedom was thrust upon him. and 
witli it came many a sorrow that he knew nol of in a 
state of sen itude. Besides, there i- a cruel disposition 
upon the part of some strangers to keep him disquiet- 
ed and restless: lor men. who are merciless and mer- 
cenary, tempt him into ill starred expeditions to El- 
dorados of the North and V\ d laugh at In- dis- 

comfiture as he returns pi imiles-. starved and in rags. 
Without trenching upon his liberty, cannot the state 
Legislatures protect him from a vicious Moses and an 

nary Canaan'.' He IS a g 1 laborer, but would 

have been much better than he is if lie had been 
shielded from his Godless and money-loving (?) friends. 
The old, polite ante-b, by still -lands w ith his 

hat off ami says with a grin of i xpectancy, "At your 
service, Ma-- William." Especially in the interest of 
this class I am writing. I propose, with some excep- 
tions, that every ex-slave who had been in a state of 
servitude for twenty years at the date of President 
Lincoln's emancipation proclamation, lie furnished 
fr.un the United stales treasury with a sufficient 
amount of money to purchase twenty acn - ot ground 
in -onie rural district of the South, in or near his place 
of habitation. I Would -hut out from tin- hem tit all 
negroes, male and female, who are pensioners, or who 
are in any w ay "employed by the Government, assum- 
ing that these classes arealready provided for. 1 would 
have a bill, embodying the above propositions and ex- 
ception-, prepared ami presented by some Congress- 
man who was himself, or his lather, a slaveholder I 
regard it as eminently fitting and opportune that a 



82 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



Democratic administration should t :< k«- the initiative 
in this racial benefaction; for certainly a proposition 
to ameliorate the condition of a Helol would have 
come with more grace from a native Spartan than a 
Roman. 

I arrogate t" myself the inherent right of making 
the above proposition: e. .</•• my mother, my father 
and grandfather were slaveholders. By descent I am 
a Democrat, as my grandmother was a near relative of 
Thomas Jefferson. However, at this present my party 
fealty is a little shriveled, as I have a disposition and 
tendency to wring the alcohol out. 

The proposition that I have made is in crude form 
—only the general drift or gist of a bill is given. I 
have 1 1 > > t so stated, but it would be necessary to incor- 
porate in the lull certain guards against land-sharks 
and pot-house politicians. Hoping thai this philan- 
thropic bird may be joined by others of stronger ami 
swifter wing, I turn it loose. Wh, M. Green. 

\ * hx UU . Ti nn. 



VIEWS BY KIOYARl) K. VOUNG. 



What a spectacle the consummation of this plan 
would present ! The greatest Republic the world has 
ever known— symbolized by a perlect Anglo-Saxon 
figure would, from the golden-wreathed chariot of 
universal liberty, dispense to l.">n,()oo ex-slaves the sa- 
cred vestments of a permanent home. These bowed 
and dusky forms would once again stand erect, if only 
to shout a welcome to their benefactor, and reach their 
hard mahogany hands to their wrinkled brows to as- 
certain whether this "is a sho' 'null' somefin' or jes a 
dream.'' 

From Maryland to Texas and from Kentucky to tin 
Gulf these new tax -payers would he distributed. 
Tlnir joy and good fortune would he shared by 
the entire American-African race. Iietead of mil- 
lions of shiftless, discouraged tenants, the South 
would have thousands of colored families living in 
their own homes, cultivating their own soil, ami feel- 
ing that tiny are at last in reality, what they have -o 
far been largely in theory, citizens of a Republic whose 
laws make no distinction " for color or previous con- 
dition of servitude." 

They would thus naturally take an interest in w hat- 
ever concerned the welfare of their own community, 
and from family relation- up to tie responsibilities of 
state, would act thoughtfully and lor the best interests 
of the country at large. 

In Philadelphia, where there is a larger percentage 
of home owners than elsewhere in America, they have 
never yet had a strike. The spectral spirit of discon- 
tent, which applied the torch to railroad cars in New- 
York and precipitated bloodshed at Homestead, can 
find no lodgement in a community where everyone 



owns his own home and is not only content ami hap- 
py but constitutionally and unalterably opposed to 

whatever is against the peace and dignity of society 
and that would tend a- all agitation does' to increase 
hi- own personal taxes, in order to meet the extra ex- 
|» rise of the State caused by the violation of the law. 

The industrial problem of the South is yet to be 
solved. Materially speaking, it is full of promise : hut 
who can tell the importance of intelligent caution at 
this point? In the great mechanical and industrial 
activity that is sure to come in the near future, does 
any thinking mind doubt that it would he well for 
the South to have thus permanently sit at ease the 
minds of many thousand adults who belong to that 
class which experience has shown are always the most 
dangerous in times of civil or political excitement '.' 

In one of the gr< ate-t speeches of his life, delivered 
at Dallas. Tex.. Oct. 26, 1888, on "The South and Her 
Problem," Henry \V. Grady said: 

"All this is no unkindness to the negro: hut rather 
that he may he led in eipial rights and in peace to his 
uttermost good. Not in sectionalism — for my heart 
beats t rue to the Union, to the glory of which your life 
and heart is pledged. Not in disregard of the world's 
opinion — for to render hack this problem in the 
world's approval is the sum ot my ambition ami the 
height of human achievement. Not in reactionary 
spirit — hut rather to make clear that new and grander 
way, up which the South is marching to higher des- 
tiny, and on which I would not halt her for all the 
spoils that have been gathered unto parties, since Dat- 
eline conspired and Caesar fought. Not in passion, 
my countrymen, hut in reason: not in narrow m-s, 
hut in breadth; that we may solve this problem in 
calmness and in truth, and, lifting its shadows, let 
perpetual sunshine pour down on two races walking 
together in peace and contentment. Then shall this 
problem have proved our blessing, and the race that 
threatened our ruin, work our salvation, as it tills our 
fields with the best peasantry the world has ever seen. 
Then the South, putting behind her all the achieve- 
ments of the past and in war and in peace they beg- 
gar eulogy — may stand upright among the nations and 
challenge the judgment of men and the approval of 
God, in having worked out, in their sympathy ami in 
his guidance, this last ami surpassing miracle of hu- 
man government ." 



The benefit of friend sending to friend the Confed- 
erate Veteran has been remarkable. IJesults are 
reported Irom various such sources. There are many 
illustrations. John P>. Kennedy, of Lewisburg, Tenn., 

writes to a friend in Nashville, thanking him for his 
copy, and adils: "It will surely secure several sub- 
scriptions from this county, as I am determined to See 
all the old Vets and have them take it." 



The Southern Historical Society has issued twenty 
volumes. R. A. Brock, the Secretary, will furnish 
data to all persons who may consider membership. 
The Society has done a great work. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



83 



PRAYER OF THE SOUTH. 



1IY REV. FATHER RYAN, l'OET 1'RIEST. 



My brow is bent beneath a heavy rod ; 

My face is xvan anil white with many woes; 
But I. will lift my poor chained hands to God 

And for my children pray, and for my foes. 
Beside the graves where thousands lowly lie 

I kneel, and, weeping for eaeh slaughtered son, 
I turn my gaze to my own sunny sky, 

And pray, <> Father, may thy will he done. 

My heart is Idled with anguish, deep and vast ; 

My hopes are buried with my children's dust ; 
My joys have lied, my tears arc Bowing fast 

III whom save thee, our Father, shall 1 trust' 1 

All! I forgot thee. Father, long and oft, 
When I was happy, rich and proud and frei 

But, conquered now and crushed, I look aloft, 
And sorrow leads me, Father, hack to tl 

Amid the wrecks that mark the foeman's path 

I kneel, and, wailing o'er my glories gone, 

I still eaeh thought oi hate, each throb of wrath, 

And whisper. Father, let thy will lie done. 
Pity me, Father > > f lie desolate. 

A las, my burdens are so hard lo bear : 
Look down in mercy on my wretched late. 

And keep me, guard me, with thy loving care. 

Pity me. Father, lor His holy sake 

Whose broken heart hied at the feet of grief 
That hearts of earth, wherever they shall break, 

Might go to his and find a sure relief. 
Ah me, how dark ! Is this a brief eclipse ' 

Or is it night, with no to morrow's sun? 
<) Father! Father! with my pale, sad lips 

And sadder heart, I pray, Thy will be done. 

My homes are joyless; and a million mourn, 

Where many met, in joys forever flown ; 
Whose hearts are light, are burdened now and lorn : 

Where many smiled, but one is I. ft to mourn. 
And, ah. the widow's wails, the orphan's cries, 

Are morning hymn and vesper chant to me ; 
And groans of men and sounds of women's sighs 

Commingle. Father, with my prayer to thee. 

Beneath mv feet, ten thousand children dead! — 
nb, how 1 loved each known and nameless one ! 

Above their dust 1 bow my crownless head 
And murmur, Father, still thy will be done. 

Ah. Father, thou ilidsl deck my own loved land 
With all bright charms, and beautiful and fair; 

But the foe mail came and. with ruthless hand, 
Spread ruin, wreck, and desolation tin-re. 

Girdled with gloom, of all my brightness shorn, 

And garmented with grief, I kiss thy rod. 
And turn my face, with tears all wet and worn. 

To catch one smile of pity from my God. 
Around me blight, where all was bloom ; 

And so much lost, alas, and nothing won 
Save this thai I can lean on wreck and ton, I. 

And weep and, weeping, pray, Thy will be d ne. 

And, oh, 't is hard 1,. say, but said, 't is sweet ; 

The words an' hitter, but they hold a halm, 
A halm that heals the wounds of mv defeat 

And lulls my sorrows into holy calm. 
It is the prayer of prayers and how it brings. 

When heard in heaven, peace and hope to me! 
When .Jesus prayed it, did not angels' wine> 

Gleam 'mid the darkness of i ret lisemane. 

My children. Father, thy forgiveness n< ed 

Alas, their hearts have only room for tears 
Forgive them, Father, every wrongful deed, 

And every sin of those four bloody years. 
And give them strength lo bear their boundless loss. 

And from their hearts take every thought of hate; 
And, while they climb their Calvary witii their cross, 

• ) help them. Father, to endure it's weight. 



And for my dead, Father, may I pray'.' 

Ah, sighs may soothe, but prayer shall soothe me more. 
I keep eternal watch above their clay — 

11 rest their souls, my Father, I implore. 
Forgive my foes they know not what they do — 

Forgive them all the tears they made me shed ; 

Forgive them, though my noblest sons they slew, 

And bless t hen 1. though they curse my poor, dear dead. 

may my woes be each a carrier dove. 

With BWJft, white w ings, that, bathing in my tears, 
Will bear thee, Father, all my prayers of love. 

And bring me peace, in all my doubts and fears. 
Father, I kneel, 'mid ruin, wreck, ami grave — 

A deseit waste win re all was erst so fair — 
And. for my children and my foes. 1 crave 

Pity and pardon ; Father, bear my prayer. 

FIRST TENNESSEE COXFEDERATi. ORG INIZATION. 



Maj. s. K. Phillips, Historian, writes that Forrest 
Camp, No. 3, of Chattanooga, was organized un 
charter dated September 1, 1885, granted bj ft. E. Lee 
Camp, Nil. 1. C. V., at Richmond, Va. Our by-laws 
ami rules of order are essentially those of tin mother 
camp. At a meeting held September 1. 1885, nearly 
sixty Confederate veterans nut to discuss the question 
id' forming a permanent organization. Rev. ami ( lorn- 
rade -I. \V. Bachman was made temporary chairman. 
The discussion was very general, but all speeches win 
very brief, ami plainly indicated that tin subject had 
been thoroughly and favorably canvassed from every 
point nf view. A committee, composed of eleven com 
rades, was appointed (Comrade -I. F. Shipp being the 
chairman to draw up a constitution, by-laws, ami 
rules of order. < Mi September 22d the committee on 
permanent organization presented a report, which was 
unanimously adopted, ami made effective by the usual 
list nf officers, with Col. Garnett Andrews a- the firsl 
commander of the camp. The selection was an ex< el- 
lent "lie. he being a veteran with a superb record, an 
executive officer nf experience, ami a man of line skill 
and ability. On October 6th the first regular meeting 
was heW-the commander calling the camp t" ordi r 
ami starting it well mi its routine of work. Com- 
mander Andrews served until in January, 1887. A 
re-election was urged upon him. Th< n I omrade -1. F. 
Shipp, who had been, mure than any other one mem- 
ber t<( the camp, instrumental in bringing it into ex- 
istence, was unanimously elected commander. From 
that time to the present, in the face of repeated refus- 
als to serve, he has been re-elected. There isn't any- 
thing connected with the camp, it- interests and his- 
tory, in which he has not been its chief inspiration. 
The camp has enjoyed amazing prosperity and influ- 
ence under bis various administrations. 



APPOIA TMENT OF GEN. A. J. VAUQHAN. 



Gen. W. II. Jackson, Major-General commanding 
the United Confederate Veterans for Tennessee, has 
issue, 1 the following general order from his headquar- 
ters at Nashville : 

"Acting under the power vested in me by tin 
stitutimi of the United Confederate Veterans, I hereby 
appoint Gen. A.J. Vaughan, of Memphis, a Brigadier- 
t ieneral of the Tennessee Division of the United Con- 
federate Veterans, vice Gen. Thomas F. Perkins, de- 
ceased, i on Vaughan is ordered to assume command 
<>( the Second Brigade >A' said division at once and 
proceed to the recruiting camps now in the brigade, 
and also to the organization of new camps." 



8 4 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



MEM0R1 \1. HAY TO oil; HEAP solJUEHS. 



It is widely known but merits record in theCoNi ed- 
erate Vi ii ran, to credit the original source of Con- 
federate Memorial Day. A late exchange says : 

"Memorial Day is observed by both ( Ion federate and 

Federal veterans, but its origin was in the South. It 

first proposed by Mrs. Mary A. Williams, the 

widow of a soldier of the Mexican and Civil Wars, 

Maj. (lias. .1. William-, of Columbus, Georgia." 

The first observance of the day was about 1868, and 
was quite g< neral, due largely to the agitation of the 
subject by Albert Lamar, now deceased, but at that 
time editor of the Columbus Sun, and the veteran ed- 
itor John Martin, then in charge of the Columbus En- 
quirt r and now political editor of the Atlanta Journal. 

The day was fixed on the 26th of April, then so 
fresh in the memories of the people of the South as 

the date of Johnston's surrender. 'This date ha- been 
generally observed since its inauguration in the more 
southern State-, while Virginia and Kentucky, and 
the more northern of the southern States, observe May 
LOth, a- their Bowers are not abundant earlier. 

After the ( lonfederate veterans had observed the day 
for two or three years the custom was adopted by the 
Union veterans, and May 30th fixed as Memorial Day. 
Throughout the North, ami at all national cemeteries 
in the South, tin- day is always observed with great 
pomp and ceremony. It has been made a holiday, 
and in the north all business is suspended. 



The ex-Confederates of Missouri and their friends 
have ever been zeaious in their efforts for their dis- 
abled comrades and their honored dead. They have 
he. ii wry zealous during the past two years in the 

pro, iin mi lit of a Home for disahled soldiers. The 

record they have made deserves publicity. In two 
years they have raised in the aggregate for the pur- 
pose $74,889.92. The Daughters of the Confederacy 
ami other ladies' societies throughout the state raised 
$18,025. Tie- Daughters of the Confederacy of the 
State of Missouri have assumed the task of erecting 
the main building of this Confederate Home, which 
is to cost $22,000. The building is now up ami under 
roof, ami will In- finished by May next. It has a 
frontage of '.hi feet, it is 110 feet deep, and is ar- 
ranged for ion to 125 inmates. The buildings already 
in use for the home have 82 men, women and children, 
who are being eared for by the Association. The ( Ion- 
federate II of Missouri is now one of the es- 

tablished institutions of the State, ami one which is 
paid for entirely by private contributions of her citi- 
zens and of which -he may he proud. If there is all 
ex-( 'on federate soldier or any member of his fan i ily ill 
a poor-house in the state of Missouri it is because the 
faet uf such service is not known. The manner of 
procuring t hi- large fund is worthy of imitation. The 
Stale wa- laid off into fourteen districts and in every 
<list riit creditable zeal wa- displayed. The smallest 
sum raised in anyone was $636, and the largest $4,067. 
The head officers of the ex-Confederate Association 
of Missouri deserve greal credit for their zeal in he- 
half of the Home and their maintenance of the or- 



gamzatio 

man. St. 
Clinton : 
Surgeon, 
ur. r. II. 

3812 Coo 

K F. I'e 
Cook. PI 

Stone, K 

11 Ken n 
( laiennie 

G. Willi; 
Station : 
Springfie 



u. [ts officers are President, -lames Banner- 
Louis; Vice l'n -id. in. Harvey W. Salmon, 
Superintendent, M. I., licit. Higginsville; 
J.J. Fulkerson, M. D., Higginsville ; Treas- 
\ Eticketts, Mexico; Secretary. W. 1'. Harlow, 
k avenue, St. Louis. Executive Committee: 
ddicord, Hannibal; F. I. Pitts, Paris; A. C. 
attsburg; Elijah dates. St. Joseph; John B. 
ansas City; F. 1'. Bronaugh, Boonville; W. 
an. Mexico; Henry Guibor, St Louis; frank 
.St. Louis; Geo. T. McNamee, St. Louis; E. 

ims. Waynesvillo; W. ('. Uronaiiirh. Lewis 
I I. C. Kennedy. Springfield; G. II. 1'. Catron, 



M EMOEIAI. r, A/A AH AT RKTlMoSlK 



The Ladies' Memorial Associations, and all the Coil- 
federate Veteran Camps of Richmond, will hold a 
bazaar there April 11th tor the benefit of the monu- 
ment now being raised to the private soldiers and sailors 
of the Confederacy, and for the Confederate Museum, 
to he established in the house in which President 
Davis resided during the war. This house having 
been given to the ladies by the city of Richmond, 
they ask the help ..f every man, woman, and child, in 
order that the entire South may share in the honor of 
erecting these two memorials. 

Each Confederate State will he represented by a ta- 
ble bearing its name. Money and articles, small and 
large, for table or restaurant, for use or beauty, should 
he addressed to "Memorial liazaar," Richmond, Va. 
All packages forwarded free by Southern and Adams 

Express ( Companies. 

Mrs. E. D. Hotuhkiss, President Memorial Bazaar. 

Mrs. Jos. Bryan, Pres. Hollywood Memorial Association. 

Miss MayG. Baughman, Pres. Jr. Hollywood Mem. Ass'n. 

Mrs. Albert Mayo, Pres. Oakwood Memorial Assoriatian. 

Mrs. II. .1. Myers, Pres. Hebrew Memorial Association. 

Mrs. .1. II. White, President Let Camp Auxiliary. 

Mrs. .1. E. Stansbury, President Pickett Camp Auxiliary. 

Mrs. .1. I). McIntyre, Recording Secretarj/. 

Mr-. I.. C. Daniel, Corresponding Secretary. 

Mrs. John B. Lightfoot, Treasurer. 



Wild WAS GEN. WHITESIDE! 



Aberdeen, S. D., November 20, 1892. 

Deab Sir— Can you furnish nie the present address 
of a Gen. Whiteside who, in 1862 and 1863, com- 
manded a bi - ide of Confederate Cavalry, and in a 
light engagement I 1 think i at Lamar. Miss., was 
wounded ami taken prisoner. A friend of mine has 
a pair of silver spur.- which he at that time took from 
the General, and would now like lo return them to 
him or his family. The lapse of time has, in my opin- 
ion, made them very valuable to their former owner 
as a relic, and my friend would take great pleasure in 
returning them. Respectfully, I'. M< Ci.achi.in. 

The above is republished IV February. 



A NORTHERN lady, in speaking of Southern leaders 
to an honored Tcnnessean, said : "I respect ( [en. Lee." 
He replied "The world respects Gen. Lee, madam." 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



35 



UNITED CONFEDERATE VETERAN CAMPS. 



ALABAMA. 
POSTOFFICE. CAMP. NO. OFFICERS. 

Bessemer Bessemer 157. ..W. K. Jones. N. H.Sewall. 

Birmingham W.J.Hardee 3'j F. s Ferguson, R. E. Jones. 

Eutaw Sanders 64...Capt. G H.Cole.F. H Mundy 

Mobile.. Raphael Semmes. II. ..Capt. Thos. T. Roche, Win 

!• M 1.1 1 . 



Montgomery. .Lomax 



E. Mickle. 
lol...Capt. Emmei Seibels, .1. H. 
Higglns. 



ARKANS \-. 

Alma Cabell 

Bentonville Cabell 89 Capl N. S. Henry, A. J. Bates. 

Centre Point Haller 1 a 

1 11:11 1, Mon Pal 1 IcIiiii'iH- 191 

< lonw ay.. -T< 11 1 ':in is 

Fayetteville W. 11. Brooks 216 

Fori Smith Ben T. Duval H6...Capt. P.T. Devaney, R.M. Fry. 

Greenwood Ben McCulIoch ..... 194... 

Hacketl 1 lit v.. Stonewall . . . 199 

Hope Gratiot 203 

Morrilton.. Robert W Harpei 

Nash\ ill.- Joe Neal 

Van Hin.ii lohn w 1 209 .. 



FLORIDA. 



BrookviUe W. W. Loring 



13 ..Gen. John 1 '. Davant, ' 'ol. 

t- red 1 1. Robertson. 

Uhipley. Chlplej . :>'... 

Dade City Pasco C. V. Ass'n. 57 Capt John B. Johnston, A. 

11. Ravi - 

Femandino. .Nassau 101 Thos. A. H 

Inverness. 1 Ward 148 Capt. W. C. Zimmerman, W. 

S, Tn rner. 

Jacksonville. ..K.K.I... 58 Gen. Wm. Baya, W.W.Tucker. 

Jasper Stewart S I apt II. J. si. wart, John K. 

llanna. 
Lake City. Columbia Co 150 Capt. W. R. Moore, W. M. Ives. 

Marianna. .... Milton 132 Capt W.D. Barnes, F. Philip. 

Monticeilo Patton Anderson. 59 W. C. Bird, B. W. Parti 

Ocala Marion Co. C. V. A apt. J. J. Fin Icy, Wm 

Orlando.. Orangi Co 1 Capt. W. II. Jewell, B M. 

Ri ibl nson. 
Palmetto.. Geo. T.Ward a Japt J. C. Pelot, J.W.Netties. 

Pensacola. . Ward C V. Ass'n.. 10 Capl 1;. J. Jordan, C. V. 

I 1 ipson. 

quiii. -v D.L.Kenan 11 pt R. H. M, Davidson, D. 

M. McMillan. 

St. Augustine E. Klrby Smith 175.. .Capt. J. A. Enslow, Jr. 

Sanford ...Gen. J. Pinnegan 11:1 Capt. A. M. Thrasher, C. II. 

1 .Her. 

Tallahassee Lamar 161 1:. V.Whitfield. 

Tampa Hillsboro 36 C't. F. W.Merrin.H.L. Crane. 

Titust ille Indian Rivet ... . 1: I '1. 1 Pi Iti hi tt, \. K 1 

GEt IRQ] \ 

Atlanta Fulton Co., Ga 159 Gen. W. L. Calhoun, John F. 

1 Iwards. 
Dalton. Jos.E. Johnston 1 Capt. \. F. Roberts, 1 i 

Blanton. 

Ringgold Ringgold . 

Spring Place John B. Qordoi lapt. II E. Wilson, W. II. 

Ramsey. 

ILLINOIS 



< thlcago Ex-t on. Ass'n.... 



S 1 't.J. W. White, K. L. France. 



INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Ardmore rohn 11. Morgan 107.. 1 apt .1. 1.. < laut, R. Scales. 

Me A lest, -r leff Lee 68 Gen. N. P.Guy, R. B. Coleman. 

KENTUCKY. 

Bowling Green..Bowling Green M3 Capt. W. F. Perry, James \. 

Mitchell. 

Cynthiana Ben Desha 99...Capt.D. M.snj ,1, ,. j.w Boyd 

Danville I. Warren Grlgsby...214 .Capt. K. M.Green, John H. 

Baugbman. 
Georgi town Georgetown 98.. .Capt. A. H. .Sinclair, J. Webb. 

Harrodsburg — William Preston ... 96. .. Capt. B. W. Allin, John Kane. 
Lawrenceburg. Ben Hardin Helm. ..101. ..Capt. P. H. Thomas, John P. 

Vaughn. 
Lexington 1. C. Breckinridge ...100...Gen. J. Boyd, »;. C. Snj der. 

Mt. Sterling Roj S. 1 Ink.' 201. ..Col. Thomas Johnson. \v. T. 

Havens. 

Paducah A. P. Thompson l74...C't.W.G. Bullitt, J. M. Brown. 

Paris John H. Morgan 96...Capt A. T. Forsyth, Will A. 

Gaines. 



KENTUCKY— Continued. 

POSTOFFICE. 1 \MP. NO. OFFICERS. 

Richmond Thomas B.Collins 215...Capt Jas. Tevis, N. B. Death- 

. rage 
Russellville. John W. Caldwell 139 Maj. J. B. Briggs. \v. r.. Mc- 



carty. 



Versailles Alex Buford 



pt. los. c. Bailey, Russell 
V. Bishop. 



LOUISIAN \ 
Alexandria JefT Davis, 6 Gen. Geo. O. Watts, Capt, W. 

W. Whittington. 

Amite City. Unite City > Capt. A. P. Richards, G. W. 

Banks ton. 

Baton Rouge Baton Roug it Gen. John McGrath, 1". \v. 

H. Ionian. 

Berwick Winchester Hall ,.178...Capt. M. W. Bateman, F. 0. 

1 1. 11. 
-onvill. Maj.v. Mau-in. .88 Capt. S. A.Poche, P. Ganel. 

1: L.Gibson 33 < ol W m M 1 well, I.t .John- 



son. 
Ditchings. 



Lake Charles Calcasieu C. Vet 62 I ipt W. A. Knapp, W. 1. 

llu 
I,. Providen 
Mansfleld Mouton 11 ...Capt. C. Scbuler, T. O. r 

I- h Norw I ii" Capl D. T. Merrick, J. Jewell 

1 ... ... 

Natchitoches. .Natchitoches 10 Capt. J. Up. Prudhi le, C. 

1 I . \ y. 

■ cans. VrmyofN. Vb I ...Col. W. R, Lyman, Thos. B. 

O'Bi 

N.« Orleans. ArmyofTenn 2. ..Gen. J. Glynn Jr., N.C'uny. 

New Orleans. Wash. Artillerj F. Lieut- 

V \.lani. 

Henry St. Paul. .18 Gen Jos. Demoruelle, Col. M. 
1 1 lucroe. 
Opelousas. R. E. L 14 Capt L. D Prescott, Col. B. 

Bloomficld. 

Plaquemlne. Iberville I s Capt Chas. II. Dickinson, 

John L. D 
Rayvllli Richland 152. ..Capt. John S. Summerlln, O. 

I Smith. 

Rustin Rustln 7 Capt A.Barksdale, J. L. Bond. 

Shreve] Cant Wm. Kinney, Will II. 

lunnard. 
Camp Moo 0.1 icki r, '■. K. 

Taylor. 
Thibodaux.. Braxton Bragg 

MISSISSIPPI. 
Booneville..... W. H. H. Tlson pt D. T. Beall, J.W. Smith. 

Columbus [sham Harrison 27 Di B. \ W. A. 

rami 
Crysta a Humphreys. 19. Capt. C. Humphries, J. M. 

Mil. A . 

Edwards W. A. Montgomery W. A. Montgomery, 11. 

v\ Barrett. 
Fayette.. J.J.Whilnej 2 Capt W. L. Stephen, W K. 

Penny. 
L Rej nolds. 

Gn inula W. R. Barksdale 

Hattiesburg n 21 Capt D. Hart field, Evan 

II ii. 

Holly Springs KitMotl I. F. Fant, S. H. Pryor. 

Jackson. Robt. V.Sinlth 24...Capt.W.D.Holder,G.SJ 

Ma. -on las Longstreet i" 1 CaptW. H. Foote, J. L. Griggs. 

Meridian Walthall . w F.Brown.B.V. White. 

Miss. City... I :. an voir 120. ..Gen. J. R. Davis, F. S. Hewes. 

Natchez Mat he! 20 Lieut-Col. F. .1. V. Lei and, 

1 11 [opkins. 
laiborne... V.K.Joues, W.W.Moore'. 

Rolling Fork .P 190... 

Roseds e Montgomery 52 Col. F. A. Montgomery, Chas. 

« i arrar. 

Tupelo lohn M St n 13 lohu M. Stone, P. M. 

Sa vi 



Vlcksburg Vicksl 

w Iville W iville .. 



1 Capl D.A.I ampbell.C. Davis. 
1!' Capt .1. II. Jon,-. P. M. 
Stockett 
Yazoo Cltj Kazoo Camp 176. .. Capt S. D. Robertson, W. R. 

Met "ntrheon. 

MISSOURI. 
Kansas City Kansas City. . S0...C't J. W. Mercer, G. B. Spratt 

N..KI II 1 IROLINA. 

Clinton Sampson 1 37 ... It . H. Holliilay. ('. F. Hi -ning. 

Concord. Cabarrus Co. C.V.A..212... 

Newton Catawba 162 ...t 'tj. G.Hall, L R.Whiteuer. 

OKLAHOMA. 

Norman i;en. J. B. Gordon. .200... 

Oklahoma C't D. H. Hammon. 177. ..Capt .1. W. Johnston. John 



"■ x r. 



t'asler. 



86 



C( >\FEDERATE VETERAN. 



SOU! H CAROLINA. 

' I' > I on-. no. 01 PICRBS. 

Aiken Barnard E. Hee -I Capt, H 11. Teague, J. N. 

W Igfall. 
St Georges. Stephen Elliott 51. J. Otey Reed. 

TENN1 SSI i 

Chattanooga .....N. R Forresl i Gen. J F. Bhlpp, L. T. Dick- 
inson. 

Clarksvlllc .Forbes 77 Cant T. 11. Smith, Cloy 

Stacker. 

FayeltevlUe S'kelford-Fulton lM...Col. James D. Tillman, W. H. 

I '.l-llHUI. 

Franklin.. Ibhn 1. McEwen Cant. B. F. Roberts, H. N. 



TEX as— I'uKtiti in ,/. 
POBTOFFICE. 0AM!'. Mi. DFFICBB& 

Fori Worth K. E. Lee I68...J. \v. Friend, Eugene Burr. 

Fnwl R- Q. Mills l08...Capt A. Chamberlain, It. M. 



'apt A. CI 

F. Wake 



apt. R. F. I 
Richardson. 



Jackson John Ingram 37...Capt E. S. Mallory, S. E. Ker- 

i..lf. 
Knoxvtlle ..... Felix K. Zolllcoffer...46...Capt John F. Horn. Chas. 

Ducloux. 
Knoxvllle... Fred lull 6...C0I. Frank a. Moses, MaJ. J. 

W. S. Frlerson. 
Lewlsburg Ml. nil 55...Capt. w. l'. Irvine, \V. G. 

1.1. .yd. 
McKenzie. . Stonewall Jackson.. 12 Capt. Marsh Atklsson, Dr. J. 

1'. 1 Milium. 
Memphis.... Con. His. Ass'n 28...Col. C. W. Frazer, R J. Black. 

Murfreesboro. .Joe B.Palmer 81. ..Capt. W. s. MeLemore.Wm. 

Led better. 
Nashville Frank Cheatham.... 85.. Elder R. Lin Cave. ( ..1. John 

l'. Hickman. 
Shelbyvllle Win. Frlerson B8...Capt John M. Hastings. Jno. 

I ■■ Arnold. 
Tullahoma Pierce R Anderson 17:1 .Capt. J. P. Bennett. W. .1. 

Travis. 

Winchester Turuey 12. ..(.'apt. W. H. Brannan, .1. J. 

Martin. 

TEXAS. 

Abilene Abilene 72. ..T. W. Dougherty. 

Abilene Taylor Co 69...Col. II. 1.. Bentley, Theo. 

lli-yck. 

A Ivarado Alvarado 160. J. H. Posey. 

Athene Howdy Martin 65. ..('apt. I' M. Morgan, W. T. 

Eustace. 
Atlanta Stonewall JackBOn.. 91. ..Capt. J. D. Johnson, James 

N. Simmons. 
Austin John BHood 103...Capt. Wm. M. Brown, (has. 

11. Powell. 
"'tit A. S. Johnston. 75...Capt. Jeff Cbaisson, Tom J- 

Russell. 
!'■' Itow Bell Co. ex-Cou As..l22...Capt. H. M.Cook, It. H. Tur- 

ner. 

Bonbam Sul Ross 164 1 apt. .1. 1'. Holmes. 

Brownwood Stonewall Jackson. .118. ..Capt Carl Vincent, R. L. 

Archer. 
Bryan I. B. Robertson ....'...124. (apt. 11. B. Stoddard, \V. 11. 

Harmon. 
Buffalo Gap L.K.Moody — ...('apt. Ben F. Jones, J. J. 



apt. Ren 
Eubank. 

'ant. J. 1 

Hlgginl 



Calvert W. P. Townsend 111. ..Capt J. 11. Drennon, C. W. 

lgglnbotbam. 
( amerson Hen McCullough 29...Capt. E.J. Mclver, Joseph R. 

Moore. 

Canton James L. Hogg 183. ..Capt T. J. Towles, W. D. 

iii pson. 

Carthage Horace Randall 188...J. R. Bond, J M. Wool worth. 

Cleburne Pat Cleburne 88...Capt 1 1. T. Plummer, M. s. 

Rahle. 
Colorado Mbert Sidney — ...Capt. W. v. Johnson, Thos. 

i(. Mullin. 
Columbus Shropshire-Upton ..112. ..Capt 1 leo. Mc( lormlck, J. .1 

Dick. 
Coleman John Pelham 76...Capt. J. J. Callan, Jam.- M 

Williams. 
Corpus Christ i. Jos. E. Johnston 88.. .Capt II. H. Sutherland, M. ('. 

Spann. 

Corslcana C. M. Winkler l47...Capt. 1:. M. Collins. 

Crocketl Crocket! Ul...Capt. Enoch Braxson, J. F. 

Martin. 

falilwell 1 amp Rogers 112. J. F. Matthews. 

Dallas si. rllng Price 81.. Capt. J. J. M r, Gen. Wm. 

L. Thompson. 
Decatur Ben McCulloch 80...Capt. Will A. Miller, A. Ed 

wards. 
Denton Sul Ross 129 Capt. Hugh McKenzie, J. R. 

Barton. 
Dublin Erath & Comanche.. 85...Gen. J. T. Harris l E Gll- 

l.-lt. 

Emma Lone Star Ins ... 

Fairfield Wm.L. Moody 87. ..Capt Geo.T. Bradley. L. G. 

Salidifcr. 

Farney Camp Bee 130. ..Capt T. M. Daniel, S. G. 

Fleming. 



Held. 

Gainesville Jos. I-:. Johnston 119.. Capt. J M. Wright, John T. 

Walk.-r. 

Galveston. Magruder 105... Gen. T. N. Waal, chris c. 

Beavans. 
Gatesville Ex-C. A.Coryell Co.185. W. l.. Saunders. 

Goldthwalte Jeff Davis... 117. JJal. J. E. Martin, F. M.Tay- 



1 ...n/a tea Gonzales 

Graham Young County.... 



lor. 
..186. Maj. W. B. Savers. M. East- 
land. 

127 (apt A. T. Gay, V. M. Ed- 
wards. 

Granbury Gran bury 67. ..J. A. Formivalt. I. R. Morris. 

Hamilton \. s. Johnston Hi; (apt \V. T. Saxon, C. C. 

Powell. 

Hemstead Tom Green 188 (apt Van I!. Thornton. Sam 

Schwarz. 

Henrietta Sul Ross 172. ..('apt F. J. Barrett, C. K. Pat- 
terson. 

Hillsboro Hill County 166. ..Wm. A. Fields. 

Houston Dick Howling 197. 

Kaufman Geo. D. Mani.ui 145.. Capt. Jos. Huffmaster, E. s. 

Pipes. 

Kingston A.s. Johnston 71. ..Capt J. F. Puckett, T. J. Fos- 
ter. 

Ladonla Robt E. Lee 126. ..Capt G. W. Hlakcncy. F. W. 

Blakeney. 
LaGrange Col.B.Tlmmons 61. ..Capt. R. 11. Phelps, N. Hol- 

man. 
Lampasas R. E. Lcc 66. ..J. S. Lauderdale, D. C. 

Thomas. 
Lubbock F.R.Lubbock Ills (apt W. D. Crump, G. W. 

Shannon. 

Madlsonvllle John G. Walker 128. ..R. Wiley. 

Meridian A. S. Johnston ll.'i ..('apt Robert Donnell, J. W. 

Adams iai-1 inc.. 
Merkel Merkel 79. ..Capt J. T. Tucker, A. A. 

Baker. 

Mexia Joe Johnston 94. ..Cant C. L. Watson, H. W. 

Williams. 
Minneola Wood County 158 Capt, J. 11. Huftmaster, Geo. 

A. Cage. 

Mt. Enterprise.. Kosscr 82.. ('apt T. Turner, B. Blrdwell. 

Mt. Pleasant Col. Dud Jones 121... Capt. ('. L. Dillahunty, .1. ('. 

Turner. 

Montague Bob Stone 93. ..Capt R. Bean, R. D. Rugeley. 

MeKinney Collin County 109. Gen. W.M. Bush, H. C. Mack. 

Navasota Pal Cleburne 102. Capl.W. E. Harry. It. M. West. 

Oakville lohn Donaldson — ... 

Palestine Palestine 44. ..Capt J. W. Ewlng, J. M.Ful- 

Liuwlder. 
Paris A. S. Johnston 7ll ('apt. Geo. H. Provine, John 

W. Webb. 
Paint Rock reff Davie 168. .('apt w. T. Mell J. W. 

Ralchford. 

Rockwall Rockwall 74. ..('apt M.S. Austin, N. C Ed- 
wards. 

Roby W. W. Loring 154 ..('apt D. Speer, W. ii. Smith. 

San Antonio A.S.Johnston 111. .('apt Johu s. Ford. Taylor 

McRae. 

Seymour... Bedford Forrest 86...Capt T. H. C. Peery, R. J. 

Browning. 

Sherman Mildred Lee mi (apt. .1. T. Wilson, R. Walker. 

Sue, iwalir. K. ('. Walthall 112. (apt W. D. Heal I, J. 11. Free- 
man. 

Sulphur Sp'gs. Man Ashcrofl 170. ..('apt. It. M. Henderson. M. G. 

Miller. 

Taylor A. S. Johnston 185 (apt M. Koss, P. Hawkins. 

Tyler V.S.Johnston 18... Capt James P. Douglas, sid 

S. Johnson. 

Vernon Camp Cabell 125 (apt Shera E. Hatchett, M. 

D. Davis. 

Waxahachle reff Davie 108. ('apt R. P. Mackey, W. M. 

McKnlght. 
Weallierford, ..Tom Green ltd (apt . I. P. Rice, M. V. Kln- 

lllsoll. 

Wichita Falls... W. J. Hardee 73... Capt. c. R. Crockett, N. A. 

Robinson. 

VIRGINIA. 

Reams Station. .J. E. B. Stuart 211... 

Richmond George E. Picketts..204... 

Roanoke William Watls 205 .. 

Williamsburg ..McG ruder- lCwell 210... 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Washington Wash. City Con 171. ..Mai. Albert Akers. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



87 



CON FEDERATE MON I " M E N TS. 



The January edition of the CONFEDERATE VETERAN 
was so short of meeting the demand, and as a history 
of Confederate monuments, complete as possible, is 
determined upon, some of the following statistics is 
a repetition of what was published before. 

The same is true in regard to those "who have 
worked for the monument." It is an honor list, and 
deserves the knowledge and the gratitude of all other 
patriots. The monument history "ill amaze the civ- 
ilized world. With all the poverty and depression 
that followed the fatal results of the war. the hun- 
dreds and hundreds of thousands of dollars so ex- 
pended, when computed, will he a dazzling record of 
patriotism ami affection for the heroes who rushed 
into the jaws of death. Let every community see 
that what they have done to honor our dead be com- 
municated for publication in the Confederate Vet- 
eran. It will he a feature, ere long, to compile a 1 i r-t 
of memorials in different States and report tabulated 
statements in the aggregate. 



The Confederate Mom mi m vt.Savannah. — The 
Confederate Soldiers' Monument in the parade ground 
was erected hy the Ladies' Memorial Association to 
the memory of the Confederate dead. The monument 
stands upon a raised terrace, and is capped by a bronze 
statue of a Confederate soldier at "parade rest." On 
the die of the monument is the dedication : 

"Come from the four winds, 
(i breath, 
A ml breathe upon these slain 
Thai they may live." 
"To TiiK Confederate Dead, 1861-1865." 

The monument was built from a design by Robert 
Reid, of Montreal, Canada. In style it is modern 
Italian. It stands ahout lift v feet in height from the 
base to the crown of the figure by which it is sur- 
mounted. On the hase of the pilasters are appropriate 
mottoes. The north panel on the first stage shows a 
figure in alto relievo, a prostrate woman representing 
the South in mourning: from her left hand she lets 
fall a branch of laurel. In one corner of the panel is 
a group of weeping willows with their drooping 
branches. The reverse panel is left vacant, although 
tin' design provides for its occupancy by a figure, also 
alto relievo, of a military character. Above the panels 
is a rich cornice. The next stage was originally an 
open canopy supported on pilasters, underneath which 
was a marble statue of Silence, hut this was removed 
and the space tilled with stone to strengthen the 
structure. Above this is another stage, deeply recessed 
and moulded, and ornamented with draped banners, 
guns and satires. The topmost panel is exquisitely 
moulded and forms the hase upon which rests the 
figure. The corner-stone of the monument was laid 
June 1(>, 1875, and the monument was unveiled in 
May, 1876. The bronze statue is a work of art. Ease, 
grace and manliness distinguish the figure, and the 
musket, worn hat, and tattered clothing are true to 
the life, reproducing with wonderful exactness the 
rents, patches, darns ami rude sewing that betray the 
deprivations and hardships which the Confederate 



soldiery had to endure in their gallant, but painful, 

struggle of four years of unsuccessful warfare. 

A Fine Monument at Augusta, Georgia.— Mrs. 

Fanny D. Nelson, Aiken. S. ('.: "I write to send 
you my subscription for the Confederate Vet- 
eran and to thank you for sending me the second 
number to look at. It is full of life and interest, and, 
while preserving the memory of past heroism, it stim- 
ulates faithfulness to In ing issues and to present duty. 
The poem regarding the l>avis Monument is very fine, 
not only rhythmical and poetical in form, hut ringing 
with a lofty nobility and fervor. Last week Brother 
W. A. and 'his his wife and I were in Augusta, and 
saw in the middle of Broad street, that smoothly and 
beautifully paved thoroughfare, a tall white monu- 
ment. It was erected to the soldiers of Richmond 
county. There was a track for electric strict cars on 
either Side, and in the midst of the travel and traffic 
of daily life stood that silent hut eloquent memorial 
.to the heroic dead, We read the inscriptions to their 
worth and valor, but my memory has brought away 

only these two lines : 

■•No nation rose so white and fair. 
None fell so purr from ci 

" It 1- made of some white stone, with a life-size fig- 
ure on the top. and figures on the corners, and severa 
bas-reliefs. 1 wish 1 had taken an exact description 
of it. so that I might now contribute it to your inter- 
esting journal. May your success be commensurate 
with the holy cause you represent. Address a sample 
copy to Mrs'. W. E. Moore, Helena, Ark. She is the 
niece of Ex-President Polk, and is deeply interested 
in all Confederate matters. No doubt you know her. 
I.he is a tluent and facile writer." 



Monuments in New Orleans.- The Confederate 
Monument in Greenwood Cemetery, built hy the La- 
dies' Benevolent Association, 1- of white marble, sur- 
mounted by a figure of a< onfederate infantryman "on 
guard." Around the pedestal are the busts of Lee, 
Sidney Johnston, Polk and " Stonewall." It was un- 
veiled' in 1867. Value. $25,000. 

Natchez. Mis-.: " We have built a very handsome 
monument to our Confederate dead costing $3,000. It 
is a shaft with life-size soldier in marble. Statue 
made in Italy." 

Confederate Monuments in South Carolina. — 

Concerning Confederate monuments in South Caro- 
lina. Wm. E. Breese, President First National Bank, 
Asheville, North Carolina, writes: "I notice that you 
omit South Carolina so far from your list of memo- 
rial monuments. 1 know no state so full of them, 
and none as tine, except in Richmond. In Charles- 
ton the Washington Light Infantry have erected two. 
on, $8,000, the other $13,000; Irish Volunteers, one 
for $15,000; Charleston Light Dragoons, $1.4, ; Ger- 
man Artillery, $20,000; Ladies' Memorial Association, 
825,000; one to John Mitchell, the Irish patriot, $5,- 
000: S. II. Anderson (Fighting Dick), $2,000; Gen. 
Ripley. $2,000. The old Citadel Academy and all the 
churches have on walls and vestibules memorial tab- 
lets Columbia has one, Camden, Cheraw, Greenville, 
Anderson, etc. I write only from memory, being a 
former South Carolinian. I have always thought that 
South Carolina headed the list. The Richmond mon- 
uments were from contributions all over the South. 
The South Carolina monuments are all home affairs." 



88 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



Newberry, S C. : "The ladies have erected a mon- 
ument to the Confederate dead from this county in 
the court house square. Ii is of marble, and costs 
$1,300." 

Anderson, S. C: "iiur noble w en have organ- 
ized a < lonfederate Menu 'rial Association, and are now 
raising funds to erect a monument in our city." 

MoNUMENl "I ARM1 01 TENNESSEE. Mound COn 

taining t • -nil is for deceased members, surmounted by 
equestrian statue of Albert Sidney Johnston in bronze. 
At the entrance t" vaults is a marble life size figure of 
a Confedei eant calling his roll. Value $35,000. 

A movement was* started for a Confederate monu- 
ment at Fayetteville, Tenn., bul it was ahand< 1 on 

int of a disastrous cyclone which swept the town. 

Jackson, Tenn., has erected a tall shaft To feet high, 
including the figure of a Confederate soldier at parade 
rest . It is in the court-house yard. 

The people of Tipton Co. Tenn.. arc raising funds for 
county monument, and have contributed more than 
$50 to the Davis monument. 



The ex-Confederate Association of Grayson County, 
Texas, are preparing to erect on the public square ai 
Sherman, a $2,500 monument to the memory of ex- 
< lonfederate soldiers. 



Monument of Washington Artillery. — Marble 
shaft on mound, statue of an artilleryman on t").. 

6] ge staff in hand. On the base are inscribed the 

names of those members of the command who were 
killed or died in sen ice, also the name- of sixty en- 
gagements in which the command participated. I a 
veiled Feb. 22, L880. Value, $15,000. 

MoNUMENl OF THE Al.MY OF W'l.sr VIRGINIA. — A 

column 50 feet above the ground, or 38 feet above the 
mound on which it stands, i >n the summit is a stone 
statue of Stonewall Jackson, 8 feet 9 inches high. 
Under the mound are vaults for the dead Jefferson 
]>avis' remains are deposited there at present. Un- 
veiled .May, L881. Value, $25,000. 

Robert E. Lee Monument. -A Doric column of 
granite on a grassy mound, surmounted by bronze 
statue of Lee L5 feet high. Entire height, 106 feel s 
inches. Column, 60 feet. Unveiled Feb. 22, 1884. 
It is in St. Charles street. Value, $40,000. 

Moni ments in Richmond. Monument to 12,000 
Confederate dead in Hollywood Cemetery, a granite 
pyramid 15 feet square and 90 feet high, erected by 
the ladies of the Hollywood Memorial Association ai 
a cosl of about $50,000, now almost covered by that 
beautiful evergreen vine, the Virginia creeper. 

Maj. J. Thomas Dunn, Portsmouth, Va.: "In your 
record of Monuments Portsmouth was left out. Allow 
me to say that Portsmouth has riot forgot her dead 

soldiers. She has a fine tument that cost about 

$9,000. It is 55 feel high, and has a statue on each 
corner representing infantry, cavalry, art illery and the 

na\ y." 

Monuments over the grave of Gen. J. E. B.Stuart, 
in Hollyw I Cemetery, to the dead of Pickett's Di- 
vision and the 'lead of Otey Battery both on Gettys- 
burg Hill in Hollywood and to the Richmond How- 
itzers, on Howitzer Place, just west of Monroe Park, 
represent an outlay of approximately 810,000. 



The greatest monument to a Confederate that has 
ever been erected, size and quality of material con- 
sidered, is the Lee monument in Richmond. In the 
reference to it elsewhere no idea of its magnitude can 
be had except that it cost $75,000, A more accurate 
description may be i xpected hereafter. 

Monument to the Private Soldiers and Sailors of the 
Confederacy, in Marshall Park, overlooking the site of 
Libby Prison, a copy of Pompey's Pillar, surmounted 
by a heroic bronze figure of the Confederate Infantry- 
man, erected by private subscriptions at a cost of 
about $50, 

Heroic Statue, in bronze, of Gen. T. J. Jackson, by 
Foley, presented by admiring Englishmen to the peo- 
ple of Virginia, erected in Capitol Square on a granite 
base, at the expense of the state. Aggregate cost, 
about $15,000. 

Bronze Equestrian statue of Gen. 1!. E. Lee, by 
Mercie, ornamental granite pedestal, from designs by 
Pujot, a i the western extremity of Franklin St.. erected 
by private subscriptions at a cost of about 875,000. 

Bronze Heroic Statue of Gen. Wm. C. Wickham, 
by Valentine, provided by private subscription, and 
erected in Monroe Park on a granite base at the ex- 
pense of the city. Total cost, about $15,000. 

Bronze Heroic Statue of Lieut. Gen. A. P. Hill, by 
Sheppard, erected over Hill's remains on the Hermit- 
age Road just north of the city, by private subscrip- 
tions, at a cost of about $15,000. 

Monument to 17,000 Confederate dead in Oakwood 
Cemetery, a massive granite obelisk, erected by the 

Ladies of the Oakw 1 Memorial Association, at a cost 

of about $5,000. 

Movements are well advanced for an Equestrian 
Statue of Gen. J. E. P>. Stuart, and a monument to 
( Jen. John R. ( looke. 

Winchester, Va., has erected a 810, (Kill monument to 
the unknown Confederate dead in Stonewall Cem- 
etery. In addition to this principal monument, dif- 
ferent Slates have erected shafts. There is one for 

Virginia that cost $1,000. Maryland has a superb 
structure, capped with a statue of a private soldier, by 
O'Brien, that cost $2,500. The statue was made on 
an order that failed and the work was procured ai a 

sma 11 percentage of its value. 

Portsmouth, Va,, has honored her soldier dead in a 
highly creditable way. It is in a monument that cost 
about $9,000, is fifty-five feet high, and has a statue on 
each curiier of the base. The statues represent the 
four branches of service I nfantry, < lavalry, Ail illery, 
and Navy. 

A monument is being erected near Newport News, 
Va., to cost between one and two thousand dollars. It 
is the work of the Lee Camp of Confederate veterans 
and thei r friends at I [ampton Va. 

Woodstock, Va. : Subscriptions have been made 
in this county for the Lee monument at Richmond, 
Jackson, Lexington and elsewhere, 

t Shepardstown, Va.: A Confederate monument has 
been erected at a cost of $2,500. It is a marble shaft. 

Culpepper, Va., has a monument that cost $1,000. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



89 



BRAVE ACT BY A UNION SOLDIER. 



A gentlemanly barber, at the shop of Charles Breyer, 
Nashville, is Charles A. Hitchcock. Attracted by a 
pencil sketch that he had made of a woman's head- 
he is an excellent artist with brush, also — 1 made his 
acquaintance and handed him a copy "l' the Confed- 
erate Veteran. He was much pleased, ami after 
reading, sent it to his daughter in Philadelphia, who 
is a gifted contributor to Jewish Women. He told me 
an interesting story of how he was wounded at 1 Gettys- 
burg by. a splinter that was shot from a fence-rail; of 
his being sent tn the field hospital, which was a barn : 
and how, while sitting mi the floor leaning against a 
post, he thoughl he had been killed. A cannon hall 
struck the post and he was knocked quite a distance 

away from it. He thoughl his hark was all shot away. 

and he watched fur the moment that he would lose 
consciousness. Although he dreaded to investigate 
his awful condition, he put his hand behind him and 
found thai the ball had not touched him. 

Mr. Hitchcock deserves the fellowship of Confede- 
rates. He was a hero mi the other side. At the dedi- 
cation nt tin' monument to his regiment, the II lth 
New York, at Gettysburg, the orator -aid: 

" But not tin- leaders a lour is our meed of praise dm'. 
Gettysburg has hern aptly st \ led t lir ' Soldiers' Battle.' 
It was not the sword of the officer, bul the muski t of 
the private, that turned the tide of battle. The count- 
less graves stretching in radiant lines down yonder hill- 
side, tell the story of the heroism and the sacrifi 
the private soldier. Unheralded is his fame; forgotti n 
excepl by few, is his name. In recalling an incident 
of the third day's hat tlr, w Inch reveals the metal of the 
men who stood in the ranks of the 111th. confronting 
the foe, I shall be pardonod a passing tribute to one of 
your number. When Sergt. Charles A. Hitchcock, 
taking his life in his hands, sped forth from your ranks 
across the open plain where the very air was quivering 
with deadly missiles and fired the building from which 
the enemy s sharpshooters were pouring an unerring, 
deadly fire into your ranks, his heroic daring shed a 
halo of glory upon your arms, of which you may well 
be proud. A jusl recognition of this brave deed subse- 
quently secured for him a merited promotion upon the 
recommendation of his Division commander." 

In another battle Lieut. Hitchcock was severely 
wounded and gets a pension of $15 per month. 



ABOUT SOUTHERN BOOKS. 



A Kenti 1 kv Story. "The Old-Time Child, Ro- 
berta," by Mrs. Sophie Fox Sea, is one of the most 
patriotic stories that has.beenput in print lately. It 
is a Kentucky story of home life on the farm, by a 
Kentucky author ami publisher. It is on sale in 
bookstores. While written as for children, it will 
bring tears to the eyes of veterans. Roberta's father 
was Robert Marsden, a yankee, who was so indignant 
that his wife would not sell slaves and land and go 
North with him that in hot blood he went off. leaving 
her behind. Ten years had passed and the silence was 
still unbroken until the child, horn soon after he had 
left and named for him, learned that a Colonel by her 
father's name was ill in the county town. She made 
way for restoration between "yankee" papa and 
"'rebel" mamma. The story does no discredit to old 
Kentucky. 



In concluding an interesting letter, printed else- 
where. Mrs. .1. .1. Dickison, of Florida, states that the 
Veteran sanctum would be invaded by "Dickison 
ami his men." Explanation comes in a delayed mail. 
A Floridian found it in the hands of a negro woman 
who had destroyed the address. A complimentary 
imte on the fly leal' saved it to our "sanctum." Mrs. 
Mary Elizabeth Dickison gives a reminiscence of the 
war in Florida. This 1. 00k. also tin Southern Cross 
ami other poems, by Mrs. Lillian Rozell Messenger, 
now of Washington City, will have attention in April. 



Concerning " How It Was," a book written by Mrs. 
Irhy Morgan, of Nashville. "Bill Arp" says: " It is 

delightfully refreshing to a veteran. 'I was all along 
thar.' Many of the actors in the scenes 1 knew, and 
could follow you all the way. These memories are 
sad hut sweet, 1 thank you tor the hook, and my 
children thank you, foi a- tiny grow older they be- 
come more interested in the splendid record." Mr. 
Albert Roberts says: " Its chief charm is in its 'un- 
premeditated art.' Us naturalness, sincerity, and sim- 
plicity.'' Dr. I». c. Kelley say-: "It is just a great 
big heart pouring out truthful and touching mem- 
ories. No history written compares with it in truth- 
fulness, vividness, variety, and the pathos of its 
pictures. If you want to .ry fifty times in one day, 
and laugh almost as many times, !_ r et this hook and 
read it." It i- sent with year's Veteran for $1.25. 

Mrs. Ann E.Snyder, of Nashville, has furnished a 
civil war history which has been adopted by many 
scl Is in different Southern State- and has enthusi- 
astic devotees in men ami women who hunger that 

tin truth he told. 



rhe Nashville Min 
It seems fitting that so great a number of " true and 
tried" men a- comprise the Confederate veterans of 
to-day should have an organ through uln.li informa 
tion may be conveyed to every section. That need 
seems to havi been met in a practical wax- by the 

C'OXFEDl RATI VETl RAN, a- edited hy Mr. S. A. Cun- 

ningham, whose initial signature, " S. A. C," has been 
well known ami popular in Tfu Daily American for 
several yen- Mr. Cunningham's service as general 
agent of the Davis Monument Fund for more than a 
yeai ha- given him a thorough knowledge of thi 
for an organ of Confederate veterans, and right well 
has h. begun it. The January issue is brim lull ot 
good things, loyal in every thought to his comrades, 
\ 1 1 50 dignified ami respectful to the other side as to 
command universal good will. The current number 
has many art icles 1 if value. 

[Nashville American, January 80.] 

Notice of The Confederate V eter \n. published a 

week or so ago. may have seemed a little extravagant 
in a mere glance at the publication, hut it has been a 
success throughout the Southern country. Without 
attempt at display Mr. Cunningham touched the 
hearts of southern people, without publishing a line 
Offensive to others, and he showed the need of just 
such a publication, making it worthy a place in any 
library, and so cheap that club rates have been ignored. 
Eminent women of the South have subscribed and are 
volunteer solicitors. 



90 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



JArtUARY EDITION EXHAUSTED. 



ITS LEADING ARTICLES WILL BE REPUBLISHED IN THE APRIL NUMBER. 

Of the first issue of the CONFEDERATE VETERAN there were printed 5,000 copies, which 
were mailed to Veteran organizations throughout the South, and other interested friends. The 
acceptance and approval were so instantaneous that the edition was far short of the demand, 
and this circular is sent in explanation to the recent subscribers. It is also distributed freely, 
as its testimonials establish its merit to public favor. 

The following testimonials certainly are unprecedented in behalf of a publication so 
small and upon but two issues. The remarkable fact is stated, with humble pride, that there 
are so far no unkind critics. 

Now is the time for open-hearted liberality. Don't borrow from a neighbor, but sub- 
scribe, and get others to do so. Solicit advertising for it, the price is low. 

Judge E.J. Barrett, Harrietta, Tex., sends three and 
hopes to send others soon. 

Capt. B. II. Teague, Aiken, S. C, sends eight names 
with -?4 and expects to send more. 

George F. Miller, [ndianapolis, [nd., "read it with 
much pleasure," and sends two subscriptions. 

Judge D.C.Thomas, Lampassas, Tex. : "This makes 
seven that I have sent, and I wish it was seventy." 

Maj. I>. s. Satterwhite, Decatur, Tex.: "Please find 
$2.50 inclosed, for which send the Veteran as herein 
directed. 

Col J. F. Bryant, Franklin, Va., along with his sub- 
scription, volunteers to get a good club at the next 
meeting of his < 'amp. 

Miss Elizabeth Fraser Price, Nashville: "I inclose a 
check for $3 for six subscriptions to the Confederate 

VETERAN. Find the names below." 

T. I!. Close, Caseyville, Ky. : "I received your cir- 
cular to-day, and send two subscriptions. — Here is for 

two more before I seal the envelope." 

II B. Stoddard, Adjutant General Texas Division, 
1'. ('. V., Bryan: " Will send you a few subscribers; it 
tills a long felt want." He has sent several. 

Otis S. 'I' raver, Sanford, Fla. : "Inclosed I send four 
subscriptions. Keep me posted as to what I can do 
for you, ami I will do it." ile sends others. 

In sending four subscriptions, Mrs. Joseph W. Allen, 
of Nashville, says : "You ought to, and I hope will, 
have one hundred thousand subscribers." 

Col. John G. Ryan, Chicago, 111.: " Send a few sam- 
ple copies. When I see any of the ' old Confed.' boys, 
will call attention to their duty." 

Mrs. A. G. V., Ocean Springs, Miss.: "Please find 
inclosed SI for subscription to Confederate Veteran. 
Received the sample copy. Very much pleased with it. 

R. H. Dykers, Waynesville, N. C: "I am glad to see 
the flame of our sacred altars is burning so brightly, 
and hope that it will warm our hearts to great en- 
deavors." 

George S. Powell, President Loan, Abstract and Con- 
struction Company, Asheville, X. C, sends five sub- 
scriptions ($2.50) and asks for sample copies that he 
may get more. 



Mrs. .1. X. I',.. Fredericksburg, Va., writes: "1 will 
take it around our city and solicit subscribers." 

F. O'Brien, Berwick, La.: "Inclosed I send $2, for 
four subscriptions. The want of just such a paper has 
long been felt. Will bring the matter before our Camp 
at next inciting " 

William King, Jr., of Lynchburg, Ya., volunteers to 
solicit advertising for the Confederate Veteran. 

The importance of what friends can do in this way is 
almost incalculable. 

C D. Bell, Bell, Ky.: " We who engaged in the un- 
pleasantness mi the side that lost wish that the truth 
should be told in regard to our action." Mr. Bell 
sends a good list of subscribers. 

Dr. W. N.Cunningham, Mansfield, La.: "As an evi- 
dence of my appreciation of your enterprise, and my 
desire for its success, I send five dollars, for which send 
three copies to the persons named, and the others to 
our Camp. I want these for veterans who are unable 

to subscribe." ■ 

Miss Mary Desha, Washington, D. C, after having 
subscribed and read it: "1 shall be delighted to do all 

I can." 

Dr. Cicero I!. Barker, of Salisbury, X. ('., in send- 
ing check for $13.50 with twenty-seven names, states: 
" We don't want club rates for such a paper and such 
a cause." 

Capt. J. L. Lemon. Acworth, Ga'.: "I "am glad to 

know you are meeting with such SUCCeSS It will be 
taken from Maine to Texas." 

John II. Keogh, Savannah, Ga. : " Your publication 
I find highly entertaining, and just what we old Con- 
fed. Yets. want. I shall solicit subscribers." 

( >f the many letters sent with clubs here is one from 
W. D. Matthews. Jacksonville. Fla.: " I was so pleased 
with it that I thought I would get you a number of 
subscribers. After securing some I concluded to get 
"in hundred, so we might have the benefit of a col- 
umn for our Camp as you propose." Then he adds: 
"You need make no apology for the CONFEDERATE 
Veteran. I have heard nothing but praise of this 
initial number." Aagain, " Inclosed 1 hand you list 
of subscribers and check for $30. I believe there are 
sixty-one names. I will inclose the 50 cents with my 
next lot of subscribers." 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



9i 



K. F. Peddicord, Vice President First District Ex- 
Confederate Association of Missouri: "Have just re- 
ceived copy of Confederate Veteran, and am pleased 
with it; inclosed rind three subscriptions." 

S. E. Kierolf, Secretary of John Ingram Bivouac, 
Jackson, Tenn., when sending seven subscriptions: 
" It seems to he the right thing in the proper place 
the filling of an empty niche in the temple." 

[n sending subscriptions for himself and the Con- 
federate Veteran Camp, of .New York. Maj. Edward 
Owen says: "It is a very cood and useful paper to 
Confederates." Others came from New York. 

J. \V. Simmons, Mexia, Tex.: "The extra copies 
you sent have been handed around until nearly all of 
our Camp have read them, and they are appreciated 
by everyone. I intend to get a club for you. 

Dr. J. P. Cannon, of MeKenzie, Tenn. says: "We 
must make the VETERAH a succor-: we ,,,nl such a 
paper, and I am glad you have undertaken the task 
■of giving a good, cheap paper." He sent a long list. 

J. P. Douglas, Tyler. Tex. : " My time is all employed, 

but will say a word here and there for the cause we old 
rebels love." 

W. P. Saunders, County Treasurer, Gatesville, Tex.: 
■"Inclosed find $."> and list of subscribers to the Con- 
federate VETERAN. It needs only to he seen and 
read to he appreciated." 

Dr. W. A. Kuapp, Lake Charles, l.a.: "1 send SI for 
my subscription and specimens to distribute in our 

Camp. We need just such a paper in our dear Sunny 
South. Will do all in my power to make this under- 
taking a success." 

John S. Lauderdale, Llano, Tex.: "To say I am 

pleased with the Confederate Veteran, but feebly 

express my feelings, and 1 shall with much pleasure, 
and hope of success, distribute them where I think 
they will dot he mi isl good." 

\V. II. Thompson. Goldthwaite, Tex. : "1 believe I 

Can scud yon at least fifty names wit h the money when 
our Camp next meets. Every old Confederate who 
loves the lost cause- and. thank God, there are many 
such yet living — will subscribe." 

Adjt.Gen II. P.. Stoddard, Bryan, Tex.: "Dear sir 

— The Commander of Camp .1 . I'.. Robertson, located 
at this place 1 Commander .1. W. Tabor), will, in a day 
or two. send you a list of twenty names ami Sid. We 
all regret that it is not an hundred." 

0. S. Tenney, Lexington, Ky.: "1 inclose you $1 for 
the Davis Monument Fund, 50 cents for the Confed- 
erate VETERAN for one year, and the pay tor our card 
in the VETERAN. I think your object a worthy one 
and I truly wish you much success." 

Gen. G. P. Thruston. of Nashville. Tenn.. who was 
■Chief of Staff to Gen. Etosecrans, and was afterward 
with Gen. George H. Thomas, on the Union side : "I 
have read the VETERAN. It tells its story in a kind, 
fraternal spirit. Inclosed find amount of the sub- 
scription." 

James (i. Holmes. Charleston, S.-C: "Herewith 
find a list of fourteen subscribers, with New York ex- 
change. A copy of your excellent paper came to my 
hand accidentally, and after reading it I determined 
to subscribe and aid you by obtaining others." 



Mrs. A. M. R., Savannah, Ga.: "I have five more 
subscribers for you and expect others next week. 
Wish it was fifty. Shall continue to work all my 
spare time for the VETERaN." 

T. M. Daniel, Commander Camp Bee. Forney, Tex.: 
"At our next meeting 1 expect to raise a large club." 

(Jen. John Boyd, Lexington. Ky. : " I am \ ery much 
pleased with the Veteran, ami. as the subscription is 

so low. no Confederate soldier should he without it. 
I will do what I can for you." He has sent many. 

Gen. Stephen D Lee. Agricultural College, Miss.: 
" 1 like it very much. The lack of such a journal has 
been long felt among old Confederates; such a means 
of communication is absolutely necessary. 1 inclose 
my subscription ; and whenever I can help you. call 
on me, and I will do all in my power." 

(apt. C. D. Pell. Bell. Ky.. sends $7.50 for sub- 
scriptions to be sent to the parties named in list. I 
was at Salem Church yesterday, and while it may not 
appear right to engage in the work of getting sub- 
scriptions to a magazine on the Sabbath, I put in a 
few moment- for you. and this is the result. I -cut 
you four on Saturday last." 

Mrs. M. D. B., Montgomery, Ala. : "Its bright face 
and cheering words betoken the success it so richly 
rves. It has a noble mission to perform in edu- 
cating the youth of our land to revere the memory and 
emulate the virtues of men whose self-sacrificing de- 
votion to the nation which rose so fair and fell with- 
out a stain, commands the admiration of the world." 

Col. J. F. Bryant, of Franklin, Va.: "1 like it very 
much, and think it richly deserves the hearty sym- 
pathy and support of the entire South." 

W. L. Stephen. Fayette. Miss.: "I will -end you 
names a- fast as I can get them. We must push up 
the good work and establish a good paper." 

A prominent Veteran, Washington City: "I read 
every word in the January number, and 'an only -ay 

if subsequent publications equal it the paper will suc- 
ceed on its own merits. Individual canvassers will 
not he needed. I predict for it a successful future, ami 
will give it a good word with Confederates here. I 
hope it will take and hold a high standard." 

Dr. J. Wm. Jones. Atlanta, (ia.: "I regard the first 
issue as an admirable one. * * * I have every rea- 
son to believe that you will make tht CONFEDERATE 
Veteran a valuable medium of communication be- 
tween ( 01 1 1, derate Cam ] is, a plea sa nt reminder of old 
scenes and memories, a valuable historic record of the 
brave old days of '61 ti.">. Whatever I can do to help 
you shall he freely done." He sends check with sev- 
eral names. 

Dr. J.C. Roberts, Pulaski, Tenn.: " The Confederate 
VETERAN brings hack to memory's waste many re- 
freshing incidents. It should he largely patronized 
and read. It is an oasis of dear ami -acini memories, 
and is a record of the sacredness of our cause. The 
young should he taught the issues that brought about 
the grandest display of patriotism the world ever saw 
and unequaled chivalry of Southern women. I feel 
you have touched a silken chord that will echo down 
the corridors ot time, and, like the dew of heaven. 
gently fall and enliven tin- love of our Southland, the 
home of chivalry ami hospitality. May it live long 
ami prosper." He sends a good list. 



92 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



l. George Moorman, of New Orleans, who has 
dune much more than any other man to organize the 
United Confederate Veteran-' Ilrotherhnod. writes: 
" Vnu have greatly exceeded my expectations in the 
elegant and complete paper you have issued. So far 
it is the best Confedi rate paper 1 have seen since the 
war. It does greal credit to your patience and ability 
and I hope your efforts will be crowned with com- 
plete BU( i I 

.1. M. Wright, Esq., Gainesville, Tex.: "All those to 
\\1 i I have shown your firsl issue of the Confede- 
rate Veteran were < 1< -1 i^rl 1 1« ■■ 1 and gave me their 
names as subscribers, saying, ' I must have it.' I shall 
urge all members of my Camp to send you their 
names as subscribers, feeling assured that great results 
toward securing funds for the Jefferson Davis Monu- 
ment will be your reward for your patriotic devotion 
tn such a worthy cause." 

George Reese, Brigadier (ieneral, I'ensaeola. Fla.: 
" The Confederate Veteran fell into my hands this 
morning and I was so pleased with it that 1 deter- 
mined to subscribe at once and to try and get other 
Confederate veterans to do the same. I send you the 
result of a half hour's work. 1 will do all I can to in- 
crease the circulation of a journal which should he in 
every Southern family. 1 inclose 84.o0 exchange on 
New York fur nine subscribers." 

John 0. Casler, Oklahoma City, 0. T. : "We all re- 
ceived the January number and were well pleased with 
it. I have several nunc names, and as sunn as they 
pay will send you another list. Our Camp will meet 

the lust of this month, and I think 1 can get a good 
li-i A great many of them live in the country and I 
dn nut get tn see them < .ft 1)1. I am delighted with it. 
You can depend mi hearing from me again shortly 
with a list of about twenty subscribers." 

M.S. Kahle, Cleburne, Texas, February 2d: "Capt. 
( ). 'I'. Plummer of our Camp handed me a copy of the 
Confederate Veteran. Its caption struck my heart 

and I immediately went to work. Vnu are in a nohle 
cause, a glorious w ork which will he felt in every ( 'amp 
organization in our Sunny Smith. I have read it 
through and through and it has given me entire satis- 
faction. It will he a welcome visitor tn my house, 
yea. thrice welcome. Find enclosed a list nf twenty-five 
subscribers for your noble paper." 

Rev. Dr. G. W. F. Price, President Nashville College 
fur Young Ladies: "Dear Mr. Cunningham — My 
daughter has become interested in the success of the 
Confederate Veteran, and has kindly undertaken 
tu secure a little club of half a dozen or more subscri- 
bers fur the same. I consider that it is a very excel- 
lent publication and well deserving the support of all 
our people. Your labors in behalf of the great cause 
to which you have devoted yourself entitle you to 
some substantial recognition, and I sincerely trust 
that you have it now within your grasp." 

John S. ford. San Antonio, Tex. : Although 1 am 
very busy writing concerning incidents which have 

happened since I came to Texas in 1846, I shall en- 
deavor to spare time to recommend the Veteran and 
procure subscribers. The work is suited to the taste 
of Confederates. As a rule they are devoted to the 
Smith, and love the United State's with the fervency a 
true patriot ever feels toward his country, lmt they are 
not ready to forget their efforts to establish a govern- 



ment upon the principles they sincerely believed lay 

at the foundation of the Union. I am sure that many 
members of A. S. Johnston Camp will subscribe." 

Dr. W. M. Vandell. El Paso, Texas. February 1 : " I 
enclose postal order for ten dollars to pay for enclosed 
li-t of twenty name-. Hope to' get you more next 
week. Send me ten copies of same to use in getting 
you ten more subscribers. Your first issue is splendid 
and worth more than the subscription for a year. I 
went out in the 'Orphan Brigade.' You shall have 
half a dollar for each suhseriher —1 don't want twenty- 
live for ten dollars." Again: "I am intensely gratified 
at the enthusiasm that the Veteran has aroused, as- 
suring its success, it seems to me, for when you get a 
big subscription list the ads. will come. I inclose postal 
order for $5 for inclosed list of nine names. This about 
finishes the available material in this place." 

FROM GEN. W. I.. CABELL. 

The Lieutenant (ieneral commanding the Trans- 
Mississippi Department of the United Confederate Vet- 
erans, writes as follows : 

"Dallas, Tkxas. January 17, 1893. 

"The Confederate Veteran (I am glad to see that- 
you dropped the "ex"), for January, was received to- 
day. Being confined to the house with a had cold. 1 
have read every word of it, and several times 1 imag- 
ined I was talking to some old comrade, of glorious old 
Mars Jeff, of Generals Lee, Albert Sydney Johnston, 
Stonewall Jackson, and other old heroes, as everything 
seemed SO fresh and so truthful, that 1 lived for a few- 
hours in the past, and forgot that I was sick and un- 
able to go out in the cold. 

"I must change my subject, as 1 find that I could 
almost till your paper if 1 were to write as 1 feel in 
reference to our duty to the living Confederate soldier. 
In this State we have made ample provision for him, 
and will take care of him until he is called to attend 
the last 'tattoo.' 

"T am glad to see that some interest is manifesting 
itself in reference to the Jeff Davis Monument Lund. 
In a few weeks we will send a pretty good sum to our 
treasurer in Richmond. I hope that you will stir 
them up all along the line. This State I have divided 
into five districts, and all are at work. I am inclined 
to think that our ( 'amps will average ($100) one hun- 
dred dollars each, not only in this State, where we 

have (120) one hundred and twenty Camps, but also 
iii the Indian Territory and Arkansas. A number of 
new ( lamps have been organized in Arkansas, and also 
in this State, and will, no doubt, join the Association 
oi' United Confederate Veterans in time to he with us 
at Birmingham on the 19th and 20th of July. * * *■ 
" Your friend and comrade, W. L. Cabell " 

Lew John I!. 1 leering, now of Kentucky, who served 
in the Twelfth Mississippi Infantry, Army Northern 
Virginia, sends this letter: 

"Versailles, Ky., January 20, 1893. 

''This is to thank you for the first issue of the Con- 
federate Veteran, and to approve and praise you 
for the nohle undertaking. YOU deserve and will 
have the gratitude of every old soldier of the South, 
and that of t heir wives, mothers, sisters, and children. 
The Veteran is appreciated as a tribute to the valor 
of the living and as an evidence of the enduring affec- 
tion in which we hold our dead. It is valuable as an 
organ for encouragement and unification of our peo- 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



93 



pie in their great and sacred memorial work. It will 
inspire general effort and promote worthy and har- 
monious co-operation. The monument at Richmond 
should represent Mr. Davis as lie represented our 
cause. I wish that it could be as magnificent as the 
courage of the men who fought for it. and as enduring 
as the devotion of the women who suffered with them. 
Ah! gold is not good enough where love and tears and 
blood were shed so lavishly. X" man who knows 
what that memorial will stand for, or cares for its im- 
pressions upon the coming generations, would con- 
sider a million of money too much to cicct and pro 
tect it. Let it be like the heroism and Buffering it 
recalls — the wonder and admiration of men! 

" Inclosed find a club of six subscribers to the V i i ■ 
khan, with check. Wishing you all the success you 
deserve, and holding myself ready to aid as I can, 1 
am yours in the strongest bonds." 



A superb memorial picture, with Mr. I>avis in the 
center, and picture;- of nearly fifty generals, price ?:! 
per copy, will lie supplied for that amount, and two 

yearly subscriptions to the VETERAN in addition. 



| Far mi m; ton, Mo. v Times. 

It ought to receive the encouragemenl of all ex-Con- 
federates and others as well, who take a pride in com- 
memorating our heroes, whether they wore the blue or 
the gray. The brave deeds and noble sacrifices of the 
soldiers on both sides bear the stamp of genuine 
American manhood ami. alike, the heritage of a re- 
united, patriotic and prosperous people. Honor our 
dead heroes. 



[The Nashville Sunday Times.) 

Volume 1, Number 1, of this splendid paper is on 
our table, and does full credit to the South. Every 

family of our Southland should subscribe for and read 
it. for it will keep green dear and sacred memories, 
and will serve as an educator to the young upon issues 
with which all southerners especially should 1 
miliar. 

[The Memphis Commercial.] 

flic Confederate Veteran is a new publication, 
right up in the van of current periodicals. It is de- 
moted to a noble cause, and is a very interesting, read- 
able monthly, too. The CONFEDERATE VETERAN has 
the < good will and godspeed upon its new 

venture. 

i i « n nceburg, Tenn., Democrat 

Such a publication has long been wanted and need- 
ed to keep active pure patriotic memories. We hope 
tli' \ i i i ran may live long to bring tin-, dear mem- 
ories t" mind of the southern veteran. 

[Benton. Ark., Courier.] 

The title is an index to its contents, and we advise 
every ex-Confederate to subscribe. We will send the 

Saline Courier and CONFEDERATE VETERAN to any ad- 
dr< BS on receipt of $1 .25. 

Nastn llle i Ihrlstiati Advo 

It is full of interesting matter and ought to have a 
wide circulation. We think that we detect in il the 

hand of our g 1 friend. Mr. S. A.Cunningham. 

[The Lovejoy, (ia.. Picayune.] 

I tv southern man should subscribe for this paper 
— only fifty cents a yi I aid its editor in his 

cram) work for the Jeff Davis Monument Fund. 







& 



*y~. 



d^L^o-^ 





L~***^ 






tzz^r- 



This fac-simile print of Mr. Davis' hand- 
writing is given because it will evidently 
be new to many readers, and because it re- 
fers to the reproduction of an old war paper 
(the Chattanooga Rebel), and many copies 
of it have been secured with which to com- 
pliment those who send several subscrip- 
tions. Those who semi for two or more 
copies can have this paper by inclosing a 
postage stamp, and along with it good cop- 
ies ot the picture of Mr. Davis, like that 
printed in the January issue. This letter 
of Mr. Davis to Mr. Parham was evidently 
one of the last he ever wrote. 




*Ca-3 — o — >- 



j-Of>~ C*^ -^*Jir-<-rr- 






Certain books of merit are offered low 
with the Confederate Veteran : 

Unir it Was. Four years among the Reb- 
els, by Mrs. [rby Morgan, of Nashville, Tenn. 
A thrilling narrative of what she remem- 
bers. Price, SI. This book and the Vet- 
eran, %\:1'i. 

Bright Skim and Dark Shadows, by Rev. H. 
M. Field, 1>. D. A series of letters on the 
South, concluding with chapters on Stone- 
wall Jackson and R. E. Lee, a noble tribute 
to great men. This is the best book, doubt- 
less, ever written about the South by a 
northern man. Price, $1.50. Bright Skies 
and the Veteran, $1.50, price of the book. 



94 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



CURE FOR ALCOHOLISM. 



AN INSTITUTE FOB THIS FEARFUL DISEASE ESTAB- 
LISHED y.V NASHVILLE. 



It is with a gn al deal of pleasure thai we announce 
the opening of an Institute in Nashville for the cure 
of Alcoholism, tin Morphine and Tobacco habits. 

The treatment used will be that of Dr. Mark M. 
Thompson, President and Founder of the National 
Bi-chloride of Gold Company, ol Chicago, 111. 

This wonderful cure, which has been successfully 
used forthe past seven years, is unqualifiedly endorsed 
by leading clergymen and the national officers of the 
W. C. T. U. It possesses all the advantages of other 
famous cures, and is in many vital respects superior 
to any other known to science. 

l>r. A. C. Potter, late house physician of the parent 
institute at Chicago, a physician of many years suc- 
cessful practice and a Christian gentleman of the high- 
est type, will be the Medical Director of the Nashville 
Institute. Mr. L. D. Frost, well known to many of 
Nashville's business men, will act as business manager. 
These gentlemen will guarantee an absolute cure or 
money refunded. We clip the following from a recent 
addressof Hon. John V. Farwell, the famous dry goods 
merchant of Chicago, and none the less famous as a 
Christian philanthropist : 

"I fully believe that Cod can and sometimes does 
tak. away all desire for liquor from a man, and I be- 
lieve just as fully that Cod has revealed to Dr. Thomp- 
son the scientific cure for drunkenness. God will not 
do lor a man what the man can do for himself, or what 
others can do for him in a scientific way ; and now 
that this great secret has been thus revealed, drinking 

men are without excuse for continuing in their 1 d- 

age. I consider this Bi-chloride of (fold Cure one of 
the greatest scientific discoveries of the age." 

The promoters of the "Nashville Institute, Bichlo- 
ride of Cold Treatment," will cheerfully give consul- 
tation and information, free of charge, to those who 
may be interested. 

Their down-town office is Room 30, Cumberland 
Presbyterian Building, Nashville, Tenn. Write to or 
call on them. 

N. B. — They have a special proposition to make to 
Camps of Confederates, W. C. T. U. and all temper- 
ance societies throughout Tennessee and the South. 



flfr^ ARE YOU .. 

AFFLICTED WITH CATARRH, BRONCHITIS, 

ASTH M A , CONST] M PTION , 
or auy disease of the 
THROAT AND LUNGS? 

Send for a book of 100 pages, mailed free, describing 
treatment and its proper use In each disease. Treatment 
by Inhalation. 

Absolute cure and satisfaction guaranteed. 

THE SPECIFIC OXYCEN CO. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 




Statement of The Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York. 

Richard a. McCukdy, President 

For the Year Ending December 31. 1892 Assets. $175,084,166 61. 

Reserve tor Policies I American Table, I percenti 8159,181,001 90 

Miscellaneous Liabilities 734,855 07 

Snip I ns 15,168,238 94 

INC (IMF. 

Premiums (32,947,765 34 

Interest, Rents, etc s.nu.iwi :«i t iii,as,Nn 21 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

To Policy Holders 819,388,532 16 

For Expenses and Taxes 7,419,611 08 ~S 26,806,148 34 

III K ASSETS ARF. INVESTED AS Fill, LOWS : 

United States Roods and other Securities. ..Sbo,x20,434 89 

Loans on I loud and Mortage, tirst lien 09,348,092 54 

Loans on storks and Bonds Iu,.>:u,.,:i7 ."»u 

Real Estate 16,638,884 26 

Cash In Banks and Trusl Companies 7,806.672 55 

Accrued interest, Deferred Premiums, etc., ii,07.\l7l 8r— $175,084,196 61 

INSURANCE AN1I ANNUITIES. 

Insurance Assumed and Renewed $6o4,909,5H6 00 

Insurance- in Force 745,780,088 00 

Annuities in Force 352,036 01 

increase In Annuities fc 82,732 98 

increase in Payments to Policy Holders 630,820 60 

increase in Receipts , 2,604,130 71 

I acreage In surplus 3,i37,266 78 

Increase In Assets 15,677,017 98 

Increase in insurance Assumed and Renewed 47,737,765 00 

Increase Id Insurance In Force 50,295,925 00 

Nhtk.-Iii accordance with the intention of the management, as 
announced in November, 1891, to limit the amount of new insurance 
actually issued and paid for in the accounts of tile year INirj to One 
Hundred Million Hollars, the amount of insurance in force as above 
stated includes 1 he amount of such voluntary limit with but a slight 
Increase, unavoidable in closing the lit in be r accounts. 

I have carefully examined the foregoing statement, and find the 
same to be correct. A. N. Watehhouse, Auditor. 

Ifci** From the Surplus a Dh'idend will be Apportioned as usual.~Wi 

Robert A. Orannis, Vice President. 
Walter R. (Jillette, General Manager. 
Frederic Cromwell, Treasurer. 
Emory McClintock, LL. D., F. I. A., Actuary. 

BISCOE HINDMAN, Nashville, General Agent for Tennessee. 



Hair and Fancy Goods. 
Hair Dressing and 
Manicure Parlors. 



Mrs. M. IMclNTYRE. Manager. 

CHURCH ST., NASHVILLE, TENN. 

MISS L. A. WHEELER, 

Massage - treatment. 

Rooms 17, 19 and 21, Fish Block, 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Electric and Hot Air lint lis. dc. 
s.a Sail with Massag) . 
Hours from 2 r. M. to ti p. M. 



LINCKS LAUNDRY 



DOES THE 
BEST WORK 



E. W. AVERELL, 
PRACTICAL JEWELER, 




215' , Union St . up stairs. 
NASHVILLE, TEND 



References. ■■' apt. E W. A.verell Is b 
member In good standing ol i Iheatham Blv- 
ouac, LT.C, v., T. D. Jno. P. Hickman, 

mai-iyr " & en t<>, y." 




The Old Guard. 



McEwens Steam Dye Works 

Make Old Clothes New. 
Match any Color or Shade- 
Write for Catalogue. 
We Pay Expressage Both Ways. 

\tsin ii.i.K.. ti:>x. 






TO CHICAGO. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



Rangum 

Root 

Liniment 

Is the 

Best 

In the 

World 

It will Cure 

A Man 

or his kind more certainly and more 
rapidly than an; other Liniment on 
earth, of Rheumatism, Tains, Swell- 
ings, Bruises, Sprains, Soreness, 
Stiffness, Sore Throal or Chest, Pain 
in Hack and Joints. Corns. Warts 
and Bunions, Insert Bltesand Stings. 
Frostbite, Cramps, Aches, Cuts and 
Wounds. It will as surely cure 

A Horse 

or his kind of Spavin. Splint, Ring- 
bone, Windgails, Putts, Swin 
ey. Scratches, Swellings, Braises, 

Sprains, Hurts. Cuts Wounds, - 
ness. Stillness, Knots, Harness and 
Saddle Hurts. 

SPURLOCK, NEAL & CO., Nashville, Terr. 



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95 



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£ C 
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2 '7 I. 



Finest St<i tionerv 



Wheeler 
Publishing Company 's. 

NASHVILLE, TFX.W 



Any bool in print sent on receipt of the 
publisher's prict . 



MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED. 

Rlissiu II and 

Turkish Baths 

FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN. 



Baxter Court Bath Roortis. 



MONDAYS AND FRIDAYS- FOR LADIES. 



MRS. M. McINTYRE, Manager,. 

Church St., Nashville, Tenn. 



96 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 




l £> t: 

, V 



^-"Tk'A *-23£S>. "-"i"*v'^!'"'""lrvV-" uo,J,T " , « 



© ^> 



i- '-^. ■■■ ■ " ;: . _ -' '- "V Sir ... 

jX^w"^ : WK 




*- it' 



wt 



ATLANTIC 

COAST 
LINE 

of Railroads 

«MO CO»»£CriO«» 



NEW YORK AND FLORIDA SPECIAL," 

SOLID VE3TIBITLB TBAIN. 

Leaves New York and St. Augustine Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. w 



There nel^r was a better Beer brewed, and never before has any 
Beer obtained such a reputation in so short a time, as 



NASHVILLE BEER! 



The proof, of course, is 
in the drinking. Try it. 
Convince yourself. 



THE WM. GERST BREWING CO. 



GIVi US YOUR PATRONAGE. 



NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Established 1867. 



FRANK ANDERSON & CO., 



WHOLESALE 



Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 

204 MARKET SQUARE, 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 
(15) 



Latest and Best 

BECKWITH & CO'S. 



Thermo Ozone Battery. 




and the cheapest device for 
'-'"-«ises by Electricity. 

uralgia, Insomia and 

inipureorimpov- 

'erworkc >\ stu- 

t lni5 : 
. Pri 
nry refunded 

<?ral Agent, 

VSHVILLE, TENN 



HOW ABOVT 1IIAT SEW 



^^PIANO OR ORGAN? 

YOTJ HAVE BEEN PROMISING IT TO YOUR 
DAI GHTER FOR A LONG 1 I Ml . 

We Have What She Wants, and We Sell Reasonably. 



ROBERT L. LOUD. 

212 NORTH SUMMER STREET, NASHVILLE. TENN 



'A5HVILLE AMERICAtt 



old paper, published :ii II pltal, bae 

utterance of the Democratic part] lnT< nnes- 
neratlons. 

„.G TO THE CONFEDERATE VETERAN 

Was t> plcal of Its nature, and it Immediately enlist* d 

to s» rve it i" 1 1"' utmost. 



J. S. OWEN & CO. 



Th< 



" American and the Confederate Veteran, both One Year 
for $1, the price of the American alone. 



WEST, JOKn TON & CO.. RICHMOND. VA„ 

Publishers. Booksellers, and Stationers. 

THE PUBLISHERS 01 

'"Greg's History of the United States/' 

with Introduction by Gen. Wade Hampton. 
Tin oni> true bistorj of the late Ci> ii War 
thai has ever been pu bllshed, 

Cloth, $2.50: /.- ath - U . H 

"The subject W treated En ;i masterly man- 
ner, ii bears noble testimony to the devo 
lion, the patriotism, and the heroism of the 
citizens of the South." Gen. Wadt Hampton. 

"1 have advertised tin- boob bj praising!! 
everywhere ever since i read it." Gen. wm. 
II. Payne. 

WH 'Agents for Virginia and North Carolina 
for the Hammond Type writers. All type- 
writer supplies. i I7i 

BARBER SHOP AND BA f H ROOMS. 



JESSE ELY 

HATS & MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS, 



Agent t jr the Celebrated Knox Hats 



C. BREVKR, 

Russian and Turkish Baths 

FOR GENTLEMEN ONLY. 



204 North Cherry Street, Nashville, Tenn. 



i 



OPPOSITE MAXWELL HOUSE. 



WANTED. 

BOOK-KEEPERS, < lerks, Stenograph! rs, 
Cashh i^. Drummers, Teachers, Mechan- 
ics, Hous< keepers, i nil road Men, Servants, 
and all persons desiring emploj menl of any 
kind in any of the Southern or Southwest) i n 
States, address, w it h stamp, 
NASHVILLE EMPLOYMENT Bl Rl \l . 
mar-lyr Nashville, Tenn. 




DEAD FINISH! 



Will Not Crack Collars 



No. 317 Church Street. Nashville. Tenn. McEwEN'S LaUNDRY. 



CIRCULAR DISTRIBUTING AND 
MAILING AGENTS. 



Work done tuoroughlj and with despatch. 
Besi References. 



230 NORTH SUMMER STREET, 

Rooms H and 10, 

NASHVILLE. TENN 
Telephone — . mar-lyr 



M. A. si'i/kr, President. Joi ii. Tbohpsoh, Vice President. Frank Pobtbrfield, Caanler. 

COMMERCIAL NATIONAL 

Nos. 310 and 312 North College Street, NASHVILLE, TE 

CAPITAL STOCK, $500,000. SURPLUS, 



M. A. Mil:!;, 
K. It. RICHARDSON, 
W. i: NORVELL, 
J. A. THOU US, 
18 



A. W. wil I 3. 

Ji ISI I'll I; I II. IMPSON, 
i; ii. mm ii . 
.1. II. i I ILLINS, 



DIRECTORS. 

W. A. WRAY. 

T. 1.. HERBERT, 

W. D. M \Yu. 

\. M IRSHALL, 

BENJ \.\ll\ lll.UM \N, 



JAM 



B. CARR 



.1. Ii. RICHARDSON, ' + 1*, 
ll: \NK PORTERFIEED, ♦ 



F. J. UHEA III \.\I. 



I'O.SI IIO.X (a AKIMIUI. 

on will take a full '■' ' keep- 

ing, shorthand and Typewrll mil', in Druugn- 
on's * onsolldated Practical Bustni 
Nashville, Tenn., you will, on entering, be 
guaranteed a goi [f you i 

take two branches, the aexl besl thine is in 
either enter for Book-keeping, Shorthand, 
eli raphy. Send for rata 
logue. Address I. I . Deaughon, Pn - 
Nashville, Tenn. mat II 



cot.... VOGEL'S 

FOB 

FINE TAILORING. 

233 North Summer Street, 
Nashville, Tenn. 



u. s. Tl NS IV 

TE 




ATTOW^EYSA^^LAlW, 

Room No. 7, NoeJhJVn BapkBull'd^ng, '. 
i:\ST SHORT STREET. I.F.VfMjXoN, KY. 
Doubtful and piiM'irifr Oasos Snj^Hexl. 




•WARD SEMIETAirsr F©S TQWEZm 

303 Pupils from 20 States. JVASHVILLiE, Hf TTj TXT TVT , 



Sdnd fotfCatalnflri'e. 



W.C. < 0LLIER, Pn Bldi m. 



POPE TAYLOR, Vice President. H. Lulls gPKRRY, ifefretai 

-A-TJarjHCOjaiZjSID CAPITAL, $100,000. 



W. C. Collier Grocery Co 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

FINE IMPORTED AXTD DOMESTIC CROCK 

.; - 

Nos. 601 and 603 Church Street, NASHYILLK, TENN. ' : " 

^ -r 

INSURE YOUR LIFE 



New York Life Insurance Company. 



You do not have to "Die to Win." 



The New York Life Insurance Company is nearly flfty years old. 

Its assets are over 8 1 M.OOo.oou. 

Its policies are perfectly free from all restrictions. 

Its new Accumulation Policy is so plain a child cun under- 
stand li. 

If you siiouM (in. i he amount of the policy is payable at once to 
your wife ami children. 

If you should in- living tin, lift eon, or twenty years from the time 
of Insuring, you get the Money Vourscll. 

If ynr stop paying fiom any reason, you do not lose what you had 
paid. 

If you need money, you eau horrowfrom the Company, and will 
be charted only Hve percent Interest. 

Write for rates, etc., or eall on 



J. W. JACKSON, Agency Director, 

3271 Union Street, Nashville, Tenn. 



ARE YOU GOING 



WORLD'S. 



If so, you should select the BEST TRAIN SF U 
a line that requires .. .. NO CHANGES 

anil makes the .. .. .^. .. LOWEST n ' 

.THE.EVANSVILLE.ROv TE- 

EvHiiNvllle A' lVrre Haute Railroad and 

< hicn^o «v titsi«rii Illinois Railroad. 

Is the Only One that can offer Through Train Service 
between the South and Chicago. 



yj & 



TRAINS DAILY 



BETWEEN NASHVILLE AND CHICAGO. 







NO CHANGE OF CARS REQUIRED. 



i Inly one change necessary between any point south of Nashville, 
and that change Is made at Nashville in the Union Depot, at a con- 
venient hour. All Excursion trains of the Kvansvillk Route will 
run into the World's Fair Grounds. Solid Vestibule Trains are equip- 
ped with Steam Heat and Plntsch (ias. Dining Cars will serve meals 
en route. Our time Is several hours faster than any other route from 
the South. Close connections made at Chicago for all points in the 
West and Northwest. For Sleeping Car reservation, maps, folders, 
rates, or general information, apply to the undersigned. 

S. L. ROGERS, Southern Passenger Agent, Chattanooga, Tenn.. 
S. D. McLEISH, Q. P. & T. A., E. * T. H. R. R., Evans\ille, Ind.' 

■ . • r 



Qopfederat^ l/eterai?. 

Published Monthly in the Interest of Confederate Veterans and Kindred Topics. 



Phice 5 Cents. i \*„i t 

YKAKLY .Ml CENTS. |' > VI. 1. 



Nashville, Tenn., April, 1893. 



TVn 1 [S. A. ( UNXINGHAM, 
in u. 4. , Kditur mid Manager. 



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UP- -V * 



THE CONQUERED BANNER. 




J 




The last t'nll ( leneral in the < 'onfederate War, on either side, died at his 
home in Sewanee, Tenn., March 'J s . 1893. 

General Kirby-Smith was a native of Florida, and graduated at Wesl 
Point in l^l*>. He was Major in the I * 1 1 i t < ■< 1 states Army when he resigned 
to go with his own people in 1S61. He was made a Confederate Brigadier 
in June, 1801, and a Major ( ieneral in October of that year. In 1862 he was 
promoted to Lieutenant General, and in 1864 a full General. His achieve 
ments in the war arc an interesting part of its history. President Davis is 
saiil to have t ■ > 1 < 1 him, in assignment of the Trans- Mississippi Department, 
in 1863j that he gave him more authority than he dare put in writing. 




11Y FATHER V 111: ill i. RYAN. 

Furl that banner, for 'tis « ■ ary, 
1 in 1 in a Its vi 1 ft 'Mb drooping dreary; 

Purl II, fold It, 11 1- best i 
For there's no) .-i man to wave It, 
And there's not :i sword to pave It, 
And there's nol one left to lave It, 
1 n 1 he blood whi< ! ave It, 

\ 1 "i its foes now scorn una brave It- 
Furl it. hide It, lei it rest- 
rake I Sow 11 - 'Us tattered, 
Hroken is it- Btafl and shatti red, 
And the valiant hosts nr. scattered 

1 »i er whom It floated high. 
1 Hi ! 'tis hard for us to fold It, 
Hard to think i In n 'e noni to hold it. 
Hard thai those who once unrolled it 
N"» 11 in -1 unfurl 11 with 11 sigh. 

lurl thai banner, furl II sadlj 

1 in.-f ten thousand ha idlj . 

And ten thousand wildly, madly, 

Swore 11 should h>n\ . r .i..\ e, 
Swore thai foeinan's sword could nevei 
Hearts like theirs en twin* d dissever, 
Till that ihn: « i fioal forei er 

OVi reedom or lh< lr grave. 

I'm I it, for I lie hands thai grasped it, 
'nd the hearts thai fondly clasped it. 
' 1 and dead a re \ ing low : 

A ml 1 in banner, it is truiii n 

While :i ion nd it sou nds the wailing 

( if iis r ople in their woe. 

for. though ci 11 11 1 a. 1 h. \ adore it. 

1 lie cold, ih ad hands thai bore It, 
V\ 1 ep for 1 hose who rell '"fore it. 
Pardon those who trailed and tore it, 
And oh ' wildlj tin > di plore II, 

Now to Ini I and fold it s... 

Furl thai banner! true 'tis gory, 

\ • 1 '1 1- ur. 10 lied around with gli try, 
And 'twill live in song and story, 

Though us folds arc in the dust ; 
For its fame on brightest pages, 
Penned bj poets :i nd liy s»ges, 
s h:i 1 1 go sou ndlnfi di iii '1 the agi «, 

Furl iis folds though now we must, 
Furl thiii banner, sof ly, slowly, 
1 1. hi 11 gently— it i- liolj 

1 "i 11 droops :iini\ e i lie dead ; 
Touch it not, unfold it nrv. r, 
1 ,1 t it drooi« 1 here, >tnl: 1 1 forever. 

For iis pi ojl- 's hi i" a arc d< ad. 



less ies: 



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and Tennessee Business College. 



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Orders fur Weddings aid Parlies Promptly FiMed. 
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.\eadetny i* nichr tie- pewunal di r.-ei ion ol a veteran teacher and report er — a veteran in a double sense, Imv tig commenced the study of 
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JSr^SHTT'IEllilLiE, TDESKTISr. 



Confederate Veteran. 



Published Monthly in the Interest of Confederate Veterans and Kindred Topics. 

Price, 5 Cents. 
Yearly, ")0 Cents. 



Vol. I. 



Nashville, Te.nn,, April, 1893. 



No. 



IS. A. CUNNINGHAM, 
I Editor and Manager. 



Entered at the Postoniee, Nashville, Tenn.. :is second-class matter. 

Special club rates to the Press and to < 'amps 25 copies S10. 

An extra copy sem to each person who sends six subscriptions. 

Advertisements: One dollar per inch one time, or $10 a year, ex- 
cept last page; 8*2o a page. Discount: Half year, onc-issne; one 
year, one issue. 



Don't fail to read all there is in the VETERAN. 
There is nothing put in to "fill up." See on editorial 
page, 112, the suggestions about remitting. 

Many articles from correspondents of merit are ac- 
knowledged. The reproduction of much that was 
published in January compels postponement to Bub- 
sequent issue. 

THERE are many things that might be advertised 
advantageously in the VETERAN. Harvesting and 
threshing machinery should have attention. Tobac- 
nists, Publishers, indeed, the variety, might be stated 
in the extreme. There is hardly an interest that 
would not be advanced by its use in these columns. 

The benefit of publishing the subscription is quickly 

apparent. Col. John I'. Hickman, the best Confeder- 
ate worker in Tennessee, one of the first who paid, 
and who has worked gratuitously all the while for 
the Veteran, finds the omission of his name. 

It has been our purpose for months to procure stub 
data in regard to population and wealth of the South- 
ern States as to apportion to each State its part of 
the $250,000 for the Davis and Southern Monument 
to be erected in Richmond. Will friends interested 
in the great cause, who can get at data, undertake the 
Supply of this information? !t would be very help- 
ful to the cause to name the assessments for the differ- 
ent States. Remember the opportunity now to render 
this patriotic service. 



SUBSi RIPTION SUPPLEMENT. 



Interest in Gen. .lames Longstreet, the ranking 
officer now of the Confederate Veterans, will increase 

after this. Here is a story recalled from a visit to 
Mission Ridge, near Chattanooga, published ten years 
ago: He had gone to the battle ground with some 
gentlemen, and at a certain point he alighted, went 
to an old tree, and prized from under a hiding place 
an old rusty blade, and turning to his companions, 
said : " Somehow I feel solemnly enthused. Here is 
a relic of exciting days. I placed that here just about 
twenty years ago. I remembered the spot just as well 
as if it had been but yesterday, and the tree is as fa- 
miliar as the face of an old comrade." 



With this issue of the CoNFEDl RATE Veteran there 
is published and mailed the names of subscribers re- 
ceived until within a week of going to press. Of the 
six thousand copies printed it will be sure that there 
is a good extra supply. Request is made of every 
patron to send the names of some friends who would 
be quite sure to subscribe. 

The March number, with the four flags, is not yet 
exhausted: copies of it will be sent to first subscribers. 

Of the entire list of Generals and Lieutenant Gen- 
erals in the Confederate Army only these were killed 
in battle: Albert Sidney Johnston, at Shiloh, Tenn. ; 
Leonidas Polk, at Pine or "Lost" Mountain, Ga.; 
Stonewall .lack son, near Guinea's station, Va. 

Gen. Richard s. E well died at Spring Hill, Tenn., 
instead of Springfield, as published in a list of gen- 
eral officers on another page. 



omission was made from Rev. Thomas F. (Jailor's 
letter commending Miss Carrie Kirby -Smith for Post- 
mistress at Sewanee through the impression that it 
had been secured. The young lady is fully capable, 
and would serve with thorough efficiency. The assist- 
ance asked for the family might be procured through 
entertainments. 

The battle of Franklin and the story of the seigc at 
Jackson, Miss., are given :i- experiences of the editor. 
He submits these with Other events from time to time 
as setting forth what merit he may possess while con- 
tributing facts for history. 



MAY FESTIVAL IN NASlfYILLE. 



No other event of the year, ahead for Nashville, is 
looked to with so much interest as the Musical Festi- 
val to be in the large Tabernacle May 5th and 6th, 
with a matinee on the evening of the 6th. It will 
consist of the Damrosch Orchestra, Miss Currie Duke, 
violinist, and Scalchi, contralto. 

Confederates everywhere will rejoice in the success 
of Miss Currie Duke, daughter of Gen. Basil Duke, of 
Kentucky, and whose mother is a sister of Gen. John 
Morgan. She has been for the last four or six years 
under the best violin instructors of Germany, and is 
considered the best lady violinist in the United States, 
if not in the world. 



9 8 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



REMOVAL Or MR. DAVIS' BODY TO RIVHMO.XD. 



Arrangement:- have been made, for the removal of 
Mr. Davis 1 remains to Richmond the latter part of 
next month, so that the burial in Hollywood Cemetery 
will occur May 30th, the National Memorial Day. It 
is understood that tin- body will lie in State in the 
capitals of Alabama and ( leorgia en route Our people 
will do all that seemetb best to show affectionate re- 
gard upon the occasion. The daily and weekly papers 
will, later on. publish the programme of proceedings 
in detail. 




The Monument to 12,000 Confederate dead in Hol- 
lywood Cemetery, Richmond, is a granite pyramid 
forty-five feet square and ninety feet high, erected by 
the ladies of the Hollywood Memorial Association at 
a cost of about $50,000. A beautiful evergreen vine, 
the Virginia creeper, is growing upon it. 



Comment is earnest upon the publication of the 
Veteran subscription list. It is a new thing in jour- 
nalism, and is regarded as a "good scheme" by some, 
while others regard it as ''giving away" knowledge 
that may be utilized by competitors. 



The Veteran has no competitor. True, there is a 
"war journal " with the sacred word Confederate be- 
fore it, published manifestly by Frank Leslie, though 
keeping that very tarnished name, from a sectional 
standpoint, away from the public. It has the accred- 
ited editorship of an ex-Confederate who has been 
-avored with a government salary for years — not in a 



discreditable way — but whose achievements for the 
southern people have in no way been conspicuous. 
The zeal with which this publication has been distrib- 
uted through the South argues well for the enterprise 
of its management, but it may expect close discrim- 
ination by our people when it scuds out a sheet on 
woody paper, with old cuts, with less than half the 
print surface, only half the pages, and at double the 
price. The southern people are so loyal to every thing 
bearing the name that many who sec it. without know- 
ing this publication, may subscribe for it. 



In this comment that right spirit has sought to be 
maintained which is meant for the good of all who 
honor Confederates. The Veteran may be too cheap, 
but it is not as much so as the print referred to is too 
high, and then it ought to be candid, and not seek to 
impress patriotic Southern people that it is published, 
in any sense, in Kentucky. 



One word more only : The consequences of results 
in patronage should never be overlooked. It should 
be a rule, even in the purchase of fruit, at a stand by 
the street, to buy where the trifle of profit will be 
most worthily applied. 



I seek not profit from old comrades. In every 
thing 1 have estimated the giving full value received. 
In the little Ku Klux Klan history offered for thirteen 
cents I left not a cent margin. Years ago I published 
a reminiscence (300 copies) of my regiment in a sixty 
page pamphlet, and, feeling able to afford it, I sent it 
to comrades without the remuneration of a cent. The 
zeal of our people in working for the Veteran with- 
out accepting commission is in the same spirit. This 
is no doubt the cheapest publication ever issued, qual- 
ity considered, and its management is willing to work 
on and on in the great cause. If the zeal of its friends 
be continued, ere long, the patronage of the business 
public will insure it to be all that can be desired. 



Disabuse any who may not understand its mission 
for the Davis or Southern Monument. It has, regard- 
less of expense, done every thing possible to advance 
that common cause. Some people not concerned for 
it, but who are cordially a friend to the editor, have 
shown indifference. Here is a singular circumstance 
on the other hand : An old friend called on me, say- 
ing he wanted to give a dollar to the Davis Monument 
but didn't want his name known. I pleaded that be 
give the use of his name, as I did not want any of 
that fund to pass through my hands without a full 
record. Then I told him I should like to have him 
subscribe for the Veteran, but he declined on account 
of the " hard times," and gave one dollar for the mon- 
ument in the name of two of his children. Another 
old friend and comrade said he would "look over it," 
while many strangers to the editor are zealous for it. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



99 




GEN. E. KIRBY-SMITH, WIFE. AND ALL OF THEIR CHILDREN BUT THE YOUNGEST. 



An effort is being made to present pictures of Gen. 
E. Kirby-Smith and his family in this Veteran. 
Addresses of Rev. Thos. F. G&ilor, Vice Chancellor of 

the rniversity of the South, :it Sewanee, Col. Thos. 
Claiborne, and other notes of the funeral, is given. 
The following extracts from a letter of Mr. Gaylor, 
though brief, set forth the pecuniary condition of the 
family: 

"Mrs. Kirby-Smith is in a distressed condition. 
There are eleven children, only two of whom are old 
enough to be self-supporting. There are six girls and 
three hoys at home. * * * Mrs. Kirby-Smith is 
in debl to the amount of $1,200. Several Veterans 
have said that they would assist in paying this off. 
Can you not make an appeal in the Confederate 
Veteran for this object? Acting for the University, 
1 am going to pay the General's salary for the rest of 
the year." 

One single instance of Kirby-Smith's integrity is 
recited: When he surrendered, having $5,000 in gold 
with him at Galveston, where he had gone with a 
member of his staff to send him to intercept Mr. Pavis 
— as by appointment the latter was to go to Cuba, re- 
turn to Texas, and arrange for a final capitulation at 
Houston — and on learning that his troops had surren- 
dered at Shreveport, La., he wrote an order directing 



the staff officer, dipt. Ernest Cucullu, to take the 
money t" New Orleans and turn it o\cr to Gen. 
Canby, commanding the United States forces. There 
was such an earnest plea on the pari of some Confed- 
erate officers that SI .7<x > of this money was paid to 
them on salary account, hut the General refused to 
take any pari of it ami borrowed 8100 from a friend 
with which to get home. Canby was surprised that 
the money was taken to him, hut was quick to express 
the regard he felt for his college-mate al West Point, 
and said: " It is just like Kirby — the soul of honor." 

No worthier family belongs to the South. The 
mother of his eleven children nursed him through 
dreadful afliction during the war, when he was 
thought to he mortally wounded, and that event 
brought about their marriage. 

Col. John P. Hickman, Secretary of the Tennessee 
Division of Confederate Soldiers, will receive and for- 
ward any sums sent to him. Col. Thos. Claiborne, 
and others, have secured about $4<>0 of the $1,200 
sorely needed at this time. The $1,200, though, 
might be trebled, and in its giving the donors would 
receive comfort. This appeal is made wholly without 
the knowledge of the family. The General was of- 
fered positions of great emolument, one of them not 
long before his death, but refused for conscience's sake. 



IOO 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



FUNERAL OF GEN. E. KlRHY-sMl I II. 



The newspapers of the country have published 
sketches of Gen. E. Kirby-Smith in connection with 
hie death. 

The funeral was an occasion never to be forgotten 

by those who had the melancholy pleasure to be pres- 
ent. There was a special train from Nashville of six 
coaches. 

The Episcopal Chapel at Sewanee was filled with 
mourners, veterans having first seats after the family. 
The usual service was interrupted, at the proper time, 
by Rev. Thomas F. Gailor, Vice Chancellor of the Uni- 
versity of the Smith. This superb young man has de- 
clined the office of Bishop and several calls to churches 
in our largest cities, like Kirby-Smith, choosing rather 
to serve his Church and fellows at Sewanee. lie is 
greatly esteemed wherever known, and his remarks 
thrilled the assembly : 

There are times when the reverent silence with 
which the Church lays her dead to rest may be fitly 
broken, and this is such a time. There are lives which ' 
stand forth conspicuous above their fellows, occupying 
lofty station or gifted with "heroic qualities of soul, or 
illustrious with great achievement, and in the best 
way of all these ways — in essential worth — this was 
such a life. As the last full General of that Confed- 
eracy which is becoming more and more a tender and 
distant memory, our dear friend in his death closed 
another generation of men. As one by one the lead- 
ers have passed over to the silent shore, some of us 
have felt that the glory and sadness, the hopes, the 
memories, the regrets of that sublime but fruitless 
struggle were concentrated in him, lent new interest 
to his life, and crowned him with a crown of honor. 
Surely all that was best and truest and most worthy 
in that cause which we call "Lost" was imaged forth 
in this pure and manful and unselfish life. And when 
the recording angel shall unroll the scroll on which 
are blazoned the names of those whose lives have been 
lives of sacrifice for conscience' sake, there will be 
none that will shine with a purer lustre than that of 
Kirby-Smith. For these qualities of a great soldier 
were pre-eminent in him — courage, magnanimity, hu- 
mility, unselfishness, and the fear of God. All the 
records of chivalry can disclose no truer nor higher 
attributes of nobleness than these. His Strength was 
gentleness, bis gentleness was strong. Valiant in light, 
a stranger to tear, a hero in many a conflict, lie was yet 
a little child in the genuineness of his simplicity — the 
reality of that humility which lie learned at the feet 
of Jesus Christ. The magnanimity of great, majestic 
souls was bis. When be surrendered the war for him 
was over. No bitter accusations, no vengeful reproach 
passed his lips. Though it were the very furnace of 
affliction, the dread anguish of shattered hopes and a 
career cut short, no darkness of those dark days coufd 
dim the cheerfulness of bis hope, the constancy of bis 
faith. No temptation of public fame, no attraction of 
worldly advantage, no opportunity of self-praise, ever 
wrung from him one harsh or angry word in poor and 
pitiful contention of reviews. Yes, over all and 
through all and in all the impulses of his nature were 
that love and fear of God which made his home a 
Christian home and made his life a Christian life. 



No stress of financial embarrassment, no privation of 

those comforts which men hold dear, tempted him for 
a moment to forget his honor. To toil, even in his 
age, to suffer and to submit; these were small Tilings 
to him compared with the sting of conscience. From 
the day when he deliberately spurned the wealth 
which his command of the Trans-Mississippi Depart- 
ment placed within his bands to the day — only a few 
weeks ago — when be refused a princely income as the 
] i rice of principle, he was always in flexibly and grandly ■ 
true to what be believed was his honor as a soldier, 
his duty as a citizen his faith as a follower of Jesus 
Christ. Thus was he brave. Thus was lie faithful. 
Thus was he a good soldier, tried and steadfast, amid 

the smoke and din and tumult of the hi l-stained 

field. Thus was he a greater soldier on that harder 
battlefield of life, where those whom we expect to be 
the bravest too often flinch and fail. 

To-day, therefore, those of us who are too young to 
have known him in tin- stirring scenes of his military 
career, but who have learned to love and reverence his 
character in the peaceful occupation and enjoyment of 
this place, come with sad hearts and glad devotion to 
pay tribute to the beauty and the strength of his 
unique personality. His faith was strong, his hope 
was buoyant. Hut above both of these and shining 
through them was a great and tender human love, of 
which the apostle speaks when he says: '' Now abideth 
faith, hope, charity, these three, but the greatest of 
these is charity." To us here this was perhaps the 
most conspicuous quality of his nature. The most 
devoted of husbands! The most affectionate of fathers! 
To the trees, the flowers, the rock-ribbed mountain 
and the starlit sky; to the creatures that crawl and 
creep and fly and run and leap around us in the living 
world; to man and brute, nature in all her moods and 
to nature's God, this man's heart went out in sweet, 
unselfish joy. God is love. 

What nobler tribute to his servant can there be 
than this? What crown of glory 80 unfailing! He 
loved much. He was much loved. And "whether 
there be prophecies, they shall fail: whether there be 
tongues, they shall cease; whether there be knowledge 
it shall vanish away, lint love never faileth." 

He prayeth well who lovotli well 
Both man and bird and beast; 
He prayetb best who In vet h best 
All things, l>"tli great and small. 
For the dear Cod who loveth ns, 
I [e made and loveth all. 

The Bishop of Tennessee, Rev. R. Q. T. Quintard, 

D.D., whose identity with the Confederacy has ever 
been the pride of the South, at the conclusion of Mr. 
(Jailor's peroration, requested that Col. Thomas Clai- 
borne, of Tennessee, a gray-haired veteran of two 
wars, address the congregation. Col. Claiborne stepped 
to the dais of the chancel and said: 

1 thank the reverend clergy conducting the services 
for the invitation to the old comrades of the deceased 
hero to give some expression of their feelings on this 
occasion. We come here to bury our friend, not to 
the sound of cannon, for the roar of a hundred brazen- 
throated guns cannot speak the praises of the dead 
hero as we estimate them, but we come to show our 
love and respect for him. 

This is not the place nor the time for us to set forth 
his eulogy, yet we desire to say what we think of him 



V 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



IOI 



as a man and brother, for he was one who felt the 
brotherhood of mankind, and dealt in charity with all 
men. I, who have known him from his youth, can 
give my testimony to the truth of all that the reverend 
gentleman has said of the life and characteristics of 
this good man. He was always gay and cheerful, no 
matter how darkly loomed the cloud of disaster. lie 
was most courteous to every one. and we feel a just 
pride that he was a son of the Smith and an adopted 
son of Tennessee. He is gone. I know that he sits 
nut at the feast of the heroes of Valhalla, for they 
werebloodv. I rather sec him now in the communion 
of those who have been redeemed through the inter- 
cession of Jesus Christ. 

At the grave there were beautiful songs as the burial 
was being concluded. The firing of salute by the mil- 
itary, largely sons of veterans, was followed by "taps" 
from the bugler. 

The various tlags 
and designs of vet- 
eran organizations are 
of interest. They gen- 
erally comprise the 

battle (lag in colors 
extending at an angle 
in one direction and 
the State flag or motto 
in another. The N. 
B. Forrest Camp, of 
Chattanooga. repre 
sent.- a cavalryman on 
a horse at a dash with 
a battje flag. Its com- 
mander, (oil. .1. F. 
Ship, on Gen. Gor- 
don's stall', conceived 
the plan for a united brotherhood, and it was given to 

the public while he was on a visit to New Orleans. 



BATTLE OF FRANKLIN. 



THE CARNAGE AS SBEy FROM CENTER OF THE COKFICT. 




Monument to Unknown Confederate Dead. — The 
Latham Confederate Monument, at Hopkinsville, K v., 

was elected by .lohn ('. Latham, the head of the hank- 
ing house of Latham, Alexander & Co.; of Wall street. 
He left Hopkinsville, his birthplace, to enter the Con- 
federate army as a private at seventeen years of age, 
continued in the service until the final surrender at 
Greensboro, N. C, in 1865. In an unattended held 
slept in eternal rest the dead warriors of the Confed- 
erate army who had been his townsmen and school- 
mates. The unmarked graves o( more than one hun- 
dred Confederates lying in the "potters' field" irre- 
sistibly appealed to the tender thought and Southern 
patriotism of Mr. Latham. The lirst step was taken 
to remove the remains to an eligible lot, and later, in 
1887, was erected and dedicated to their hallowed 
memory this handsome shaft by their surviving com- 
rade, a noble Kentuckian. The monument is of 
Hallo well granite. The base of the structure is eight 
feet square, supporting a pedestal of two polished 
stones. Above this the die, seven feet in height, with 
four polished panels. Tin' die is surmounted by a 
square obelisk with Corinthian capital, crowned with 
a pyramid ol five polished cannon halls. The whole 
structure is thirty-seven feet high, elegantly wrought 
of the finest granite, marked for its classic tasteand 
simplicity. 



Much of the following article appeared as a tribute 
to Gen. Strahl in the January number: 

The removal of Gen. Johnston, and the appointment 
of Hood to succeed him in command of the Army of 
Tennessee, was an astounding event. So devoted to 
Johnston were his men that the presence and imme- 
diate command of Gen. Lee would not have been ac- 
cepted without complaint. They were so satisfied 
that even in retreat they did not lose their faith in ul- 
timate success. They were not reconciled to the 
change until the day before the battle of Franklin. 
The successful crossing of I Hick River that morning 
at an early hour, and the march to Spring Hill, where 
the Federal retreat was so nearly cut off (a failure for 
which it was understood (I en. Hood was no1 to blame I, 
created an enthusiasm for him equal to that enter- 
tained for Stonewall Jackson after his extraordinary 
achievements. That night the extensive valley east 
of Spring Hill was lighted up by our thousands of 
camp tires, in plain view of, and close proximity to, 
the retreating lines of the enemy. The next morning, 
as we marched in quick time toward Franklin, we 
were confirmed in our impressions of Federal alarm. 
I counted on the way thirty-four wagons that had 
been abandoned on the smooth turnpike. In some 

instances whole teams of mules had been killed to 

prevent their capture. A few miles south of Franklin 

the Federal lines of infantry wire deployed, and our 

progress was checked; but we pressed them without 

delay until they retired behind the outer works about 
the town Soon after they withdrew from the range 

of hills south, overlooking the place, and we were ad- 
vanced to it- crest. I happened, though in the line of 

bait le I as I w a- " right guide " to my regiment I. to be 
close to where Gen. Hood halted his staff and rode 
along to the top of the hill, and with his field glasses 
surveyed the situation. It was an extraordinary mo- 
ment. Those of us who were near could see, a- private 
soldiers rarely did. the position of hot h armies. Al- 
though Franklin was some two miles in the distance, 
the plain presented a scene of great commotion. But 
1 was absorbed in the one man whose mind was de- 
ciding the fate of thousands. With an arm and a leg 
in the grave, and with the consciousness that he had 
not until within a couple of days won the confidence 
which his army had in his predecessor, he had now a 
very trying ordeal to pass through. It was all-impor- 
tant to act, if at all, at once. He rode to Stephen D. 
lee. the nearest of his subordinate generals, and, 
shaking hands with him cordially, announced his de- 
cision to make an immediate charge. 

No event of the war, perhaps, showed a scene equal 
to this. The range of hills upon which he formed 
offered the best view of the battlefield, with but little 
exposure to danger, and there were hundreds collected 
there as spectators. Our ranks were being extended 
rapidly to the right and left. In Franklin there was the 
utmost confusion. The enemy w r ere greatly excited. 
We could see them running to and fro. Wagon trains 
were being pressed across the Harpeth river, and on 
toward Nashville. Gen. Loring, of Cleburne's division, 
made a speech to his men. Our Brigadier-General 
Strahl was quiet, and there was an expression of sadness 
on his face. The soldiers were full of ardor, and con- 



102 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



fident of success. They had unbounded faith in Gen. 
Hood, whom they believed would achieve a victory 
that would give u- Nashville. Such was the spirit of 

the army as the signal was given which set it in mo- 
tion. Our generals wen- ready, and some of them 
rode in trout of our main line. With a quick step we 
moved forward to the sound of stirring music This 
is the only battle that I was in, and they were many, 
where bands of music were used. I was right guide 
to the Forty-first Tennessee, marching four paces to the 
trout I had an opportunity of viewing my comrades, 
ami I well remember the look of determination that 
on every face. Our bold movement caused the 
enemy to give up, without much firing, its advance 
line. As they fell hack at double-quick, our men 
rushed forward, even though they had to face the grim 
line of breastworks just at the edge of the town. 

Before we were in proper distance for small arms 
the artillery opened on both sides. Our guns, firing 
Over our heads from the hills in the rear, used ammu- 
nition without stint, while the enemy's batteries were 
at constant play upon our lines. When they with- 
drew to their main line of works it was as one even 
plain for a mile. About fifty yards in front of their 
breastworks we came in contact with formidable 
chevaux '/< frise, over or through which it was very dif- 
ficult to pass. Why half of us were not killed yet re- 
mains a mystery, for after moving forward so great a 
distance, all the time under fire, the detention, imme- 
diately in their front, gave them a very great advantage. 
We arrived at the works and some of our men, after a 
club fight at the trenches, got over. The colors of my 
regiment were carried inside, and when the arm that 
held them was shot oil' they tell to the ground and re- 
mained until morning. Cleburne's men dashed at 
the works, but their gallant leader was shot dead, and 
they gave way. so that the enemy remained on our 
flank, and kept up a constant enfilading fire. 

Our left also failed to hold the works, and for a short 
distance we remained and fought until the ditch was 
almost full of dead men. Night came on soon after 
the hard fighting I" ran, and we fired at the flash of 
each other's guns Holding the enemy's lines, as we 
continued to do on this part of them, we were terribly 
massacred by the enfilade firing. The works were so 
high that those who fired the guns were obliged to get 
a footing in the embankment, exposing themselves, 
in addition to their flank, to a fire by men in houses. 
One especially severe was that from Mr. Carter's, im- 
mediately in my front. I was near Gen. Stiahl, who 
stood in the ditch and handed up guns to those posted 
to fire them. I had passed to him my short Enfield 
(noted in the regiment) about the sixth time. The 
man who had been firing cocked it and' was taking de- 
liberate aim when he was shot and tumbled down 
dead into the ditch upon those killed before him. 
When the men so exposed were shot down their places 
were supplied by volunteers until these were ex- 
hausted, and it was necessary for (Jen. Strahl to call 
upon others. He turned to me, and though I was 
several feet back from the ditch, I rose up immedi- 
ately, and walking over to the wounded and dead, took 
position with one foot upon the pile of bodies of my 
dead fellows, and the other in the embankment, and 
fired guns which the (ieneral himself handed up to 
me until he, too, was shot down. One other man had 
had position on my right, and assisted in the firing. 
The battle lasted until not an efficient man was left 



between us and the Columbia pike, about fifty yards 

to our right, and hardly enough behind us to hand up 
the guns. We could not hold out much longer, for 

indeed, hut few of us were then left alive. It seemed 
as if we had no choice lmt to surrender or try to get 
away, ami when 1 asked the General tor counsel, he 
simply answered, " Keep tiring." Hut just as the man 
to my right was shot, and fell against me with terrible 
groans, Gen. Strahl was shot, tie threw up his hands, 
falling on his face, and I thought him dead, hut in 
asking the (lying man, who still lay against my shoul- 
der as he sank' forever, how he was wounded, the (ien- 
eral. who had not I n killed, thinking my question 

was to him, raised up, saying that lie was shot in the 
Deck, and called for ( !ol. Stafford to turn over his com- 
mand. He crawled over the dead, the ditch being 
three deep, about twenty feet to where Col. Stafford 
was. His staff officers Started to carry him to the rear, 
hut he received another shot, and directly the third, 
which killed him instantly. Col. Stafford was dead 
in tin.' pile, as the morning light disclosed, with his 
feet wedged in at the bottom, with other dead across 
and under him after he fell, leaving his body half 
standing, as if ready to give command to the dead! 

By that time only a handful of us were left on that 
part of the line, and as I was sure that our condition 
was not known, I ran to the rear to report to (ien. 
John C. Brown, commanding the division. I met 
Maj. Hampton, of his staff', who told me that Gen. 
Brown was wounded, and that Gen. Strahl was in com- 
mand. This assured me that those in command did 
not know the real situation, so I went on the hunt for 
Gen. Cheatham. By and by relief was sent to the 
front. This done, nature gave way. My shoulder 
was black with bruises from tiring, ami it seemed that 
no moisture was left in my system. I'tterly exhausted, 
I sank upon the ground and tried to sleep. The hat- 
tie was over, and I could do no more; hut animated 
still with concern for the fate of comrades, I returned 
to the awful spectacle in search of some who year alter 
year had been at my side. Ah, the loyalty of faithful 
comrades in such a struggle! 

These personal recollections are all that 1 can give, 
as the greater part of the battle was fought after night- 
fall, and once in the midst of it, with but the light of 
the flashing guns, 1 could see only what passed di- 
rectly under my own eyes. True, the moon was shin- 
ing, but the dense smoke and dust so tilled the air as 
to weaken its benefits, like a heavy fog before the ris- 
ing sun, only there was no promise of the fog disap- 
pearing. Our spirits were crushed. It was indeed the 
Valley of Heath. S. A. Cunningham. 



and 



THE following new Camps have Keen admitted 
notice given by Adjt. Cen. George Moorman : 

"W. II. Brooks Camp, No. 216, Fayetteville, Ark.: 
Chipley, No. 217, Chiplcy, Fla. : Hugh A. Arnolds, 
No. 218, Greenwood, Miss.; Hickory Flat, No. 219, 
Hickory Flats, Miss.; DeSoto. No.' 220. Hernando, 
Miss.; Frank Liddell, No. 221, Vaidan, Miss.; Pat Cle- 
burne, No. 222, Waco, Texas; Springville, No. 22:?, 
Springville, Ala. ; Franklin K. Heck. No. 22 1, Camden, 
Ala.; Wilson County, No. 225, Floresville, Texas; 
Amite County, No. 226, Liberty, Miss.; Frank Terry, 
No. 227, Richmond, Texas; Birchell, No. 228, Hun- 
gerford, Texas; Arcadia, No. 229, Arcadia, La.; Jeff'. 
Davis, No. 230, Jacksonville, Fla.; R. E. Lee, No. 231, 
Commerce, Texas. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



103 



HARPERS FERRY IN 1861. 



FIRST EVENTS OF THE WAR IN VIRGINIA AND 
MARYLAND. 



F. M. Burrows, Company B. Thirteenth Virginia In- 
fantry, Fort Worth, Texas: From time to time many 
articles have been published purporting to give a true 
history of the early occupancy of Harper's Ferry in 
L861, which have been incorrect. One account is that 
"the first Southern soldiers at Harper's Ferry were 
about 1,600 Mississippians, who captured the place 
about the 15th of May." As a high private in the 
Culpepper Minute Men, I left Culpepper, Va., at 3 a.m., 
the 18th day of April, 1861, fir Harper's Ferry. 

These commands of Virginians were sent there: 
West Augusta Guards, Staunton. Va., sixty men. 
Louisa Blues, Louisa Court-house, Va., seventy-live 
men; Montpelier Guards, Orange Court-house, Va., 
sixty men; Gordonsville Greys, Orange County, Va., 
fifty men; Monticello Guards, C harlot teville, Va., 
sixty men; Brandy Rifles. Culpepper County, Va., 
forty men; Boomarangs, Winchester, Va., forty men; 
Continental Guards, Uharlestown, Va., forty men; 
Letcher Artillery, Culpepper, Va., thirty-five men; 
University of Virginia Students, Charlottsville, Va., 
one hundred and twenty men ; Culpepper Minute Men. 
Culpepper, Va., sixty men. [mboden'fi Artillery, of 
four guns, and a full complement of men, followed us 
on the 18th. The Lanier Guards, of Baltimore, came 
to us on the 23d, making in all about seven hundred 
and fifty men, rank and tile. We reached Manassas 
Junction about 8 a. m , took trains for Strausburg, ar- 
rived there about 1 p. \i.. got dinner, which hail been 
prepared by the good ladies, then took up our line of 
march for Winchester, about eighteen miles distant, 
arrived in time for a late supper, which the good ladies 
there had literally spread all over town. We boarded 
a train of box cars at 11 p. H, for Harper's Ferry, via 
Charleston; arrived at the Ferry just before daybreak 
on the 19th. Nearly all of us had guns of some kind, 
except the Letclier Ait illtrv, a company of boys. 
They were empty-banded, and when the first long roll 
was sounded it was amusing to see them hurry to their 
quarters and fortify themselves with sticks ami stones. 
Maj. George A. Wheatley, now a merchant in Austin, 
Texas, was Captain, and a very young brother of the 
writer was First Lieutenant. 

It will be clearly seen that there were none but 
Virginians at Harper's Ferry tor three weeks or more, 
save the Baltimoreans and Col. Duncan's Kentuckians, 
about three hundred strong. The command was a 
fine one. The Kentuckians were generally men of 
wealth and refinement, and they were well prepared 
to care for themselves financially, having their repeat- 
ing rifles, cow-horn powder llasks, and bullet moulds. 
The Hon. R. E. Beckham, now District Judge at Fort 
Worth, was one of the boys from Kentucky who wore 
the fur cap and lung green blouse. 

The first soldiers were ordered out by a telegram 
from Gov. Letcher, direct to the various Captains of 
the State Militia, dated Richmond, Va., April 17. 
An extra session of the Legislature passed the ordi- 
nance of secession at '1 a. m. on the 17th. When the 
news reached ('apt. Harbour that the troops were 
marching on Harper's Ferry, he, being in command of 
the Government's works, abandoned liis post and had 
the buildings fired. The destruction would have been 
complete but for the timely efforts of the citizens, in- 



cluding workmen in the shops, who, with their small 
hand engine and a large stationary one belonging to 
the Government, subdued the flames. It was the lit- 
tle house for this hand engine that John Brown used 
as a fort in 18")!'. We reached Harper's Ferry about 
daylight on the 19th. Our train stepped on a high 
trestle on the Shenandoah river side. While we were 
waiting for orders to leave the train some one put 
twenty or more kegs of powder under the trestle, set 
a match to the fuse, and ran. One of our men. Beeing 
what bad been done, jumped from the train and sev- 
ered the fuse. Finally we landed in good shape, and 
made a descent upon the town, not knowing what we 
would encounter, without one round of ammunition. 
We took up our quarters in the buildings that re- 
mained intact, and in the churches and school-houses. 
For the first week the citizens were very shy of us, 
but soon became communicative and delivered to us 
many hundreds of minie rifles and muskets, and in- 
numerable parts of guns. We found many guns hid- 
den away under floors and between and under mat- 
tresses. The machinery, unhurt by the fire, was 
speedily put in motion, and man v of the old employes 
were set at work and furnished all the commands with 
the latest and most approved guns. 

The first officer in command was Col. Xalle. Then 
came Col. Jos. E. Johnston, who succeeded him, and 
who appointed Stonewall Jackson a Colonel. Each of 
them occupied the mansion on the hill belonging to 
Maj. D. B. Lucas, U. S. A. Next cam.' Capt. A P. 
Hill, of the regular army, who had recently resigned 
and was made Colonel Of the Thirteenth Virginia In- 
fantry. 

Our company was quartered in the paint shop, and 
it was the writer's luck to be detailed with the Hon. 
John W. Bell, a prominent lawyer of Culpepper, to po- 
lice and ditch our camp. It was rich indeed to see 
our near-sighted lawyer handle a spade and hear his 
comments, such as, "This is a nice business for a 
lawyer in good standing, a gentleman, and a member 
Of St. Stephen's Church vestry, to be put to ditching 
the first Sunday in camp'" He is now Judge Hell, a 
brother of Gov. I'. Hansborough Hell, who was a native 
of Virginia, who landed at Velasco, Texas, in 1836, 
* * * * and was made (iovernor of Texas in 1850. 
He subsequently served in Congress, then married, 
and settled iii North Carolina. As a recognition of 
his patriotic services, and as an aid to him in his old 
age, the Twenty-second Texas Legislature, in 1891, 
voted him a donation of land and a liberal pension. 

We remained at Harper's Ferry until about the 
middle of May. when we were called to arms and 
made a forced march to Shepherdstown. We were 
caught in a terrific hail storm in an open field, no pos- 
sible place for shelter, and it was a question with us 
whether we would survive the storm or not. 

The Lanier (iuards, of Baltimore, deserve special 
mention, (ieorge Lanier, of Lanier Bros., wholesale 
dry goods merchants in Baltimore, equipped and sent 
off this company to join us at Harpers Ferry. Times 
were exciting there then. This scheme was adopted 
to get out of the city in a body: A funeral procession 
was planned. Loading a coffin with guns, and mak- 
ing preparations for a decent burial, they took car- 
riages and followed the hearse to London Park Cem- 
etery, a few miles west on the Catonsville road. When 
a safe distance from the city the coffin was opened, 
and quickly each man was armed and on his way to 



io4 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



join the young Confederacy. Many of the Lanier 
Guards were engaged in the attack on Federal soldiers 
when they made that memorable march up Pratt 
Btreel in Baltimore. 

About June 27 we were ordered from Harper's Ferry 
to Winchester, thence <>n a march to Romney, and 
thence to New Creek Station, on the Baltimore & < >hio 
Railroad, where we first smelt gun powder. A small 
force of Federals held the bridge crossing the north 
fork of the Potomac river aear the station. We sur- 
prised them, captured a swivel and a stand of colors, 
charged the enemy, ran them off, and burned the 
bridge. A few of us crossed the bridge, followed the 
retreating enemy a Bhorl distance, and upon returning 
found the bridge on fire, and we on the wrong Bide of 
tin- rive]-. Our only alternative was to wade through 
a swift, clear, rapid stream fully five feet deep. 

After the battles of Hull Run and Manassas it was 
the writer's privilege to stand picket at the farm-house 
of a good old Mrs. Taylor, a few miles east of Fairfax 
Station. It was there I learned the true meaning of 
the word Manassas, and how it originated. A faithful 
old negro man belonging to Mrs. Taylor met a neigh- 
boring brother, and addressed him about as follows: 
''Uncle Willis, kin yer tell me how dey got dis name 
Manassas fur dis place down darwhardey lias all dem 
big guns?" "1 dunno. Brer Ephriam, cep'ing t is we 
is de man. and dem Yankees whar cum down here is 
de asses; dats how we gets de name Manasses, 1 speck."' 



Monument at Alexandria, Va. — All honor to the 
women and the men of Alexandria, Ya., who close by 
the capital of the nation have elected a super!) mon- 
ument to their own Confederate dead. It is sin- 
mounted by a soldier with hat in hand, his arms 
folded, and standing with his head a little drooped, as 
if he was preparing to make another vigorous hattle 
— a hattle with conditions which mean the recovery 
of fortune, and redemonstrating merit to distinction 
as a patriot. An old paper comes to the Veteran, 
which says: "For all time will Alexandria hear in 
her heart of hearts the manner of those gallant men 
who, on the 24th day of May, 1861, left their homes at 
the call of public duty, for the monument is inscribed 
with the names of those Alexandrians, whose homes 
never saw them again, but the hearts of whose fellow- 
citizens' will enshrine them forever. 

"'Von marble minstrel's voiceless stone, 

In deathless song shall tell, 
When many a vanished year has nown, 

The story how you fell ; 
Nor wreck, nor change, nor winter's blight, 

Nor Time's remorseless doom, 

I an dim "in- ray of holy ligni 
That gilils your glorious tomb. 1 

"Names of scores who went from Alexandria and 
never returned are engraved. The other inscription 
on the monument is: ' Krected to the memory of the 
Confederate dead of Alexandria, Ya., by their sur- 
viving comrades. May 21, 1889.' On the south face, 
and on the north face, the words: 'They died in the 
consciousness of duty faithfully performed,' will he cut 
after the unveiling of the memorial." It cost $1,400. 



Adjt. W. A. Campbell, Columbus, Miss.: "Your 
last number of the Confederate Veteran at hand, 
and I have read the contents with much pleasure. At 
the next meeting of our camp will try and get you a 
list of subscribers. The price is so small that every 
member should take it." 



Southern Standard, Arkadelphia, Ark.: "Every 'old 
Confed.' should send and get it, as it contains much 
information and a variety of reading on subjects re- 
lating to the ( lonfederate side of the civil war between 
the North and the South." 

Mrs. Mary E. Dickison, Ocala, Fla. : "I inclose check 
for .?"). with list of names of ten more subscribers to 
the Confederate Veteran. It is very gratifying to 
your friends to read the well-merited testimonials of' 
approval and admiration of your very valuable pub- 
lication. As a connecting link to the sad, yet glorious, 
memories of the past, the CONFEDERATE VETERAN 
should have an honored place in every home." 

Hon. S. I>. MeConnick, Henderson. Ky.: "Inclosed 
an- fifty representative names subscribed in four hour's 
work on the streets of Henderson. You will find 
check for $25. Your list will grow to one hundred 
here." 

Pulaski (Tenn.) Citizen: "It is brim full of interest- 
ing war reminiscences and matters of general interest 
to every Southerner. The character of its contents 
and the low price of subscription should give it a cir- 
culation of fifty thousand within the year. The owner 
and editor of the paper deserves well the splendid 
success which is being given him." 

La Grange (Texas) Democrat: "We have received 
the February number of the Confederate Veteran, 
published at Nashville, Tenn. It is a gem, ably edited, 
neat in form and print, and contains a great deal of 
useful knowledge. • This magazine is intended to he a 
storehouse of Confederate history and should find a 
place at the fireside of every old Confederate." 

.1. Mclntire Andrews, Columbia, Tenn.: "Inclosed 
please find my check for 811, twenty-two subscribers 
to your good book, although I have been in bed half 
of the time and am hardly ever able to go to town." 

Neal's State Gazette, Dyersburg, Tenn.: " Every issue 

is filled with matter such as veterans love to read 
when the day's work is over and their minds are left 
fne to revert to the glorious, though melancholy, 

memories of the great civil war. The editor and man- 
ager is an experienced journalist and a man in thor- 
ough sympathy with his work. The magazine is 
worth ten times as much to any veteran." 

Atlanta Constitution, March 22 : "S. A. Cunningham, 
of Nashville, Tenn., who is so well known in news- 
paper circles throughout the South, and who has 
taken up the work of enterprising the Jefferson Davis 
Monument, is in the city. Mr. Cunningham is also 
the publisher of the new Southern magazine called 

tic Confederate Veteran, and which he is publish- 
ing to promote the interests of the old soldiers of the 
South.' 1 

The Sunny South, Atlanta, (la.: "The Confederate 
VETERAN for March, with its illustrated cover display- 
ing in colors the four different flags adopted by the 
Confederate Government, is a beauty and an honor to 
the South. Designed by its founder, Mr. Cunning- 
ham, as a nucleus about which to concentrate interest 
in the proposed monument to Jefferson Davis, this 
magazine broadens its scope with every number and 
is becoming a historical publication of high interest 
and value. We shall look for it from month to month 
with pleasurable anticipations." 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



!°5 




JEFFERSON DAVIS AT EIGHTY. 

Jefferson Davis was born in L808, and lived eighty- 
one years. His birthplace was in a broad, low house 
at Pairview, a small village in < hrist ian— now Todd — 
County, Kentucky. He visited the place in 1886 and 
participated in the dedication of a pretty brick Baptist 
church that had been erected "ii the site of tin' old 
house. There was a large gathering of people from 
the neighborhood, while others had gone many miles 
through excessive rain. It was a most disagreeable 
day. As the venerable gentleman stood in the midst 
of the congregation, whose happy faces are indelibly 
impressed upon the mind of the writer, he used this 
language: "Many of you may think strangely of my 
participation in this service, not being a Baptist. My 
father was a Baptist, and a better man." 

In her Memoirs of Jefferson Davis his wife copied 
just as he furnished them to a stenographer, tails 
about his family and his own career, points of which 
are embodied in this little sketch. 

Three brothers came from Wales in the early part of 
the Eighteenth Century and settled in Philadelphia. 
The youngest, Evan Davis, subsequently removed to 
Georgia, then a colony of Great Britain. He was the 



grandfather of Jefferson Davis. The father, Samuel 
Davis, had moved from Augusta, Ga., to Southwestern 
Kentucky, ami resided at Fairview when Jefferson, 
the tenth and last child, was born. 

Samuel Davis had entered the army of the Revolu- 
tion at the age of sixteen, with two half brothers 
named Williams, and while a boy soldier met the 
beautiful Jane Cook in South Carolina, who became 
his wife ami the mother of Jefferson Davis. In his 
infancy the family moved to Louisiana, but ill health 
induced their return to Wilkinson County, Miss. 
Three of his brothers were in the War of 1812, and 
the fourth volunteered, but "was drafted to stay at 
home." The Mississippi home of Samuel Davis was 
ratler on .1 divide, whereby to tin wesl on rich land 
were Virginians, Kentuckians, and Tennesseans, and 
t" tie east on inferior soil were South Carolinians and 

Georgians. The settlements were sparse, however, for 

Mississippi was then of tin' territory cede. I by Georgia 

to the United States, and there were but few SCl Is. 

At the age ni seven Jefferson I >avis was -cut on horse- 
back through the "wilderness" to a Catholic school 
in Washington Comity. Kentucky. He journeyed 
with Maj. Hinds, who commanded the Mississippi 
Dragoons in the battle of New < Orleans, and his family. 
On reaching Nashville they went to the Hermitage 
for a visit to Gen. Jackson. In the reminiscences Mr. 

Davis dwells upon that prolonged visil of several 
weeks and upon his " opportunity to observe a great 
man," and he had always remembered "with warm 
affection the kind and tender wife who presided over 
his house." < ien. Jackson then lived in "a roomy log 
house, with a grove of line forest trees in its front." 

In that Catholic school for a time young Davis was 
the only Protestanl boy. and he was the smallest. He 
was very much favored, and roomed with the priest. 
One night he was persuaded by some associates to 
blow out the light in the reverend father's room that 
they might do sonic mischief, which they did in a 
hurry. He was interrogated severely, but said he 
" didn't know much, and wouldn't tell that." Finally 
he agreed to tell a little about it on condition that he 
1"' given his liberty. That little was that he blew out 
the candle. After two years steamboats had been put 
on the river, and by a steamer the lad returned home 
from Louisville. 

Conforming to a plan proposed by his brother, who 
went after him, the happy lad, with throbbing heart, 
approached his dear old mother and asked if she had 
seen any stray horses round there. She had seen a 
"stray boy," and clasped him to her arms. He ran to 
the field where he found his father, who took him in 
his arms with much emotion and kissed him. 

Young Davis went afterward to neighborhood 
schools, which were very poor, but one Mr. Shaw, 
from Boston, advanced him more than any other 



io6 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



s 



ler be ever had. Shaw married in Mississippi, 
and he preached while teaching. 
Jefferson Davis was Benl again to Kentucky, anil 

placed at the Transylvania University, near Lexington. 
Afterward lie was one of six United States Senators 
who were fellow-students at that University. At the 

early age of fifteen he was given a cadetship at West 
Point. 

Ben is a little extract from his dictation : "When 
I enteral the United States Military Academy, that 
truly great and good man, Albert Sidney Johnston, 
had preceded me from Transylvania, Ky., an incident 
which formed a link between us and inaugurated a 
friendship which grew as years rolled by, strengthened 
by after associations in the army, and which remains 
to me yet a memory of one of the greatest and best 
characters I have ever known. His particular friend 
was Leonidas Polk."' 

Mr. Davis then gives an account of Polk's religious 
convictions, and of his joining the church. It is 
known that he afterward was a Bishop in the Kpi,- 
copal Church. Polk was a Lieutenant General in the 
Western Army with Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, whom 
he confirmed into church membership only a few 
weeks before he was killed by a cannon shot from the 
enemy. The dictation ended too early. In referring 
to it. he said to his wife, "I have not told what I 
wish to say of Sidney Johnston and Polk. I have 
much more to say of them." 

The history .-tarts on from the dictation in a manner 
worthy the distinguished wife. 

Our people generally know quite well how meanly 
the publishers treated the author in regard to the roy- 
alty on her book, and that she succeeded in stopping 
its sale when they owed her a little more than four 
thousand dollars. When legal technicalities are re- 
moved, and she can procure what is due her on sales, 
there will, no dotfbt, be many orders given for the 
work, both because of its merits ami the wish to show 
an appreciation of her noble service in its presentation. 



THE REBEL YELL. 



In the VETERAN for February a thrilling story is 
given of young Davis while a Cadet at West Point. 
He and a companion were oil' the premises without 
leave. To avoid a professor they were hurrying home 
by a cliff, when Davis fell over a distance of some sixty 
feet. His companion, leaning well over the precipice, 
called out, "Jeff, are you dead?" He was severely in- 
jured, though saved by a tic top, and did not get out 
for weeks. 



The Anaconda (Montana) Standard: "A periodical 
of a new and distinctive type is the Confederate 
VETERAN, devoted to the men who wore the gray dur- 
ing the civil war. It is not, however, a paper that 
lights the war over and tries to open old wounds, but 
it is, rather, devoted to the policy of burying the 
issues of the unfortunate conflict, and is as loyal to 
the stars and stiripes as is any Northern publication." 



Many people think of the three measured huzzas 
given now and then as "the rebel yell." It is shock- 
ing to an old Confederate to consider such deception. 
The venerable widow of Rear Admiral Raphael 
Semmes, in attending a Confederate reunion at Mem- 
phi- a couple of years ago. modestly expressed her 
wish to hear "the rebel yell." Something of an old- 
time cheer came from the throats of men who gladly 
tried to compliment the wife of the eminent naval 
commander. Ki liar Anderson, who was of the Ken- 
tucky Orphan Brigade and had heard the yell, wrote a 
reminiscence for the Memphis Appeal. It is this same 
Anderson, called Captain and again (Jen. Anderson, 
who honored his native Kentucky, his adopted Ten- 
nessee, and American heroism some months ago at 
Coal Creek, in defying the miners who had captured 
him and demanded his head as a ransom, when it 
seemed only hopeless to refuse their demands. One 
thing is sure, he had heard "the rebel yell." 

"There is a Southern mother on this stand who 
says she wants to hear 'the rebel yell ' once more." 

" The announcement transforms, and in an instant 
I find myself acting the humble part of file-closer to 
Company 1, Fifth Kentucky Infantry, with pieces at 
the right shoulder, the brigade in route column. With 
the active, strong, swinging stride of the enthusiastic, 
trained soldier, they hold the double quick over rocks, 
logs, gullies, undergrowth, hill, and vale, until amid 
the foliage of the trees above them the hurling shell 
and hissing shot from the enemy's field guns give no- 
tice that if retreating they have missed the way. Yet. 
there is no command to halt. Direct, on unchanged 
course, this battle-scarred and glory-mantled battalion 
of Kentucky youths continues, and as they reach the 
open woods, in clarion tones comes the order. •Change 
front, forward on first company,' etc. The order ex- 
ecuted found them formed on ground but recently oc- 
cupied by a battalion of their foes, and few of these 
had left their positions. The battalion of Kentuck- 
ians were in battle array where they once were, but 
now the ground was almost literally covered with the 
Federal dead, the entire length of our regiment of 
seven hundred men. Men, did I say? Soldiers is 
the word ; there were few men among them, they being 
youths, but soldiers indeed. The increasing spat, 
whirl, and hiss of the minnic balls hurrying by left 
no doubt of the fact among these soldiers. They are 
about to enter the act ion again and forward is the order. 
' Steady, men. steady ; hold your fire ; not a shot with- 
out orders. It is hard to stand, but you must not re- 
turn it. We have friends in our front yet. They are 
being hard pressed, and their ammunition is almost 
expended, but they are of our proudest and best, and 
Humphries' Mississippians will hold that ridge while 
they nave a cartridge.' 



" It is nearing sunset, and after two days of fearful 
carnage — yea, one of the best contested battles of the 
times, the enemy has been driven pell-mell from many 
parts of the field. Our losses are numbered by thou- 
sands, and we are now advancing in battle array, the 
little red flag with blue cross dancing gaily in the air 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



107 



over the heads of those who were there to defend it. 
The last rays of the setting sun had kissed tin- autumn 
foliage when we stepped into open ground and found 
that we were among the wreck of what a few short 
minutes ago had been a superb six-gun battery. The 
uniforms of the dead artillerymen and the gaily ca- 
parisoned bodies of the many dead horses, proclaimed 
this destruction the work of our friends. We look 
upon the dead, pull our cartridge boxes a Little more 
to the front ami resolve once more to face tin destruc- 
tion we are now entering. The boom of artillery in- 
creases. The rattle of musketry is steady — aye. inces- 
sant and deadly. The sulphurous smoke has increased 
until almost stilling. Only fifty yards of space sep- 
arates us from the gallant Mississippians we are there 
to support. They have clung to the ridge u ith a death- 
like grip, but their last cartridge has been tired at the 
enemy, and their support being at band these Bturdy 
soldiers of Longstreet's corps are ordered to retire. 



"Simultaneously the support was ordered forward. 
As the Mississippians retired the deep-volumed shouts 
of the enemy told us plainer than could words that 
the enemy thought they had routed them Oh, how 
differently we regarded the situation! If they could 
have seen them as we — halting, kneeling, lying dow n. 
ranging themselves in columns of tiles behind the 
large trees to enable us to get at the enemy with an 
unbroken front, each man a- we passed throwinj 
high into the overhanging foliage in honor of our 
presenci — then I imagine their shout- would have 
been suppressed. ' Steady in the center ! Hold your 
tire! Hold the colors back!' The center advanced 
too rapidly. We are clear of our friends now, only 
the enemy in front, and we meet face to lace on a spur 
of Mission Ridge, which extends through the Snod- 
grass farm, and we are separated by eighty yards. 
Thud' and down goes Private Robertson. He turned. 
smiled, and died. Thud ! ( 'orporal < J ray shot through 
the neck. '(Jet to the rear'' said I. thud! Thud! 
Thud! Wolf, Michael, the gallant Thompson. Thud' 
Thud! Thud! Courageous Oxley, the knightly 
1 Vsha, and duty-loving ( unmiings. And thus it goes. 
The fallen increase, and are to be counted by the hun- 
dreds. The pressure is fearful, but the ' sand-digger ' 
is there to stay. "forward' forward!' rang out 
along the line. We move slowly to the front. 



"There is now sixty yards betwi en us. The enemy 
scorn to ily; he gives back a few paces ;«he retires a 
little more, but still faces us. and load.- as he backs 
away. We arc now in the midst of his dead and 
dying, but he stands as do the sturdy oaks about him. 
We have all that is possible for human to bear: our 
Losses are fearful, and each moment some comrade 
passes to the unknown At last Humphries' Missis- 
sippians have replenished boxes and are working 
around our right. Trigg's Virginians arc uncovering 
to our left. I feel a shock about my left breast, -pin 
like a top in the air, and come down in a heap. I 
know not bow long before came the sounds ' Forward! 
Forward! Forward!' 1 rise on my elbow. Look! 
Look! There they go, all at break-neck speed, the 
bayonet at cliarge. The tiring appears to suddenly 
cease for about rive seconds. Then arose that do-or-die 
expression, that maniacal maelstrom of sound ; that 
penetrating, rasping, shrieking, blood-curdling noise, 
that could be heard for miles on earth, and whose 



volumes reached the heavens; such an expression as 
never yet came from the throats of sane men. but 
from men whom the seething blast of an imaginary 
hell would not check while the sound lasted. 

"The battle of Chickamauga is won. 

"Hear Southern mother, that was 'the rebel yell,' 
and only such scenes ever did or ever will produce it. 

" Even when engaged, that expression from the Con- 
federate soldier always made my hair stand on end. 
The young men ami youths who composed this un- 
earthly music were lusty, jolly, clear-voiced, hardened 
soldiers, full of courage, and proud to march in rag-, 
barefoot, dirty, and hungry, with head ereel to meei 
the plethoric ranks of the best equipped and best fed 
army of modern times. Alas' how many of them are 
decrepit from ailment and age, and although we will 
never grow old enough to cease being proud of the 
record of the Confederate soldier, and the dear old 
mother- who bore them, we can never again, even at 
your bidding, dear, dear mother, produce 'the rebel 
yell.' Never again; never, never, nevi 

I 

GOVERNOR TURNEY ON MR. DAVIS. 



Till PATRIOT AND STATESMAN'S OPINION OF HIM. 



In a speech at Clarksville, Tenn., Judge Turney said 
In did not care to make a speech, except to keep him- 
self identified with the immortal idea of constitu- 
tional government. 

This was not altogether an oca-ion of mourning. 
The South bad much to be thankful for. Her grand 
leader had lived Lot l> to -< «■ the intense hatred 

and slander bom of the war pass away, ami to know 
thai the divisions among his own people were healed, 
and all believed that b« ai t< d upon conscientious and 
upright judgment. 

He >pok. of Mr. Davis as a comrade as well as a 
statesman. He had -ecu him risk his life on two 
battlefields. He remembered seeing him at the first 
Manassas, and he fell outraged that the great guiding 
brain of the Confederacy, as he considered Mr. Davis, 
should take -neb risks. \gain. when the noble Hat- 
ton tell, Mr. Davis was ,,1, the held. He saw Hat ton's 

troops go into tin fight, and. noting Hatton at its 

head, Mr. Pa vis said: "That brigade moves in hand- 
somely, but it will lose its commander." Mr. Davis 
thought for others, but not for himself. 

He thought Mr. Davis the ablesl defender of con- 
stitutional law in the Union. From his sacrifice he 
could come to no other conclusion than that Mr. Davis 
believed in the justice of the South's cause as he be- 
lieved in the Christian religion. He had absolutely 
no doubt of the right of a State to go out of the Union 
when .the terms of the Union were violated. His 
State papers would live as long as Jefferson's. He was 
the equal of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Webster, and su- 
perior to all who lived when he breathed his last. 
Mr. Davis was immortal. He would live while man- 
hood lasts. 



io8 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



THK OLD VIRGINIA TOWN, LEXINGTON. 



WHERE LEE ASH STONEWALL JACKSON ABB BVRIED- 

REM1NISC1 ZNCE8 HF STONEWALL JACKSON. 

BY DR. J. WILLIAM JONES. 



Lexington, Va., is the most interesting town of its 
size in the South. The Washington-Lee University, 
founded by the "father of his country" and presided 
over by Robert E. Lee, when he surrendered life's 
duties, is the most prominent and conspicuous insti- 
tution of the place. It has a beautiful chapel, across 
the campus from the University main building, in 
which the body of < len. Lee re.-ts. and over which is 
thai Life-like work of Edward V. Valentine, represent- 
ing, in white marble, the soldier and Christian as if 
asleep on his couch. The old mansion in which Gen. 
Lee resided is near by, and it is the residence of Gen. 
Curtis Lee, his son, and successor as President of the 
University. It is the family residence as well, the 
daughters residing there. 

The Virginia Military Institute grounds adjoin those 
of the Washington-Lee University, and are entered 
through its campus. This old place, with its ancient 
cannon ornamenting the grounds, was especially in- 
teresting on the occasion of the visit which induces 
this article, for it was in honor of its I 'resident, who 
went to the li-oiit with its corps of cadets in lSiil, and 
never returned until he had "crossed over the river," 
honored second to no soldier hero of any country or 
time. 

This writing is from memory of an only visit made 
there July 21, 1891, an account of which was written 
at the time but never published, and the copy lost. 

The Lees were all at home and cordially interested 
in honoring the memory of Gen. Thos. J. Jackson. 
It was the greatest day in the history of old Lexing- 
ton, for the attendance was much larger than that 
when the formal presentation of the recumbent figure 
of Gen. Lee occurred. 

A superb colossal bronze statue of Stonewall Jack- 
son had been provided, and his body had been removed 
from the original family lot to the central circle in the 
old cemetery of the town, and the bronze figure (it is 
also by Mr. Valentine) was in position. 

The principal ceremonies were had under the broad 
shades of the University campus, some half a mile 
away, at the conclusion of which the great procession, 
numbering perhaps 20,000, passed through the main 
streets and mar the old church, where Jackson taught 
his negro Sunday-school. The military — infantry, 
cavalry, and artillery —passed by the cemetery and 
formed on an adjacent slope in the rear. 

By the statue, still under a white mantle, there was 
a platform covered with white bunting, upon which 
Mrs. Jackson ascended, taking her two grandchildren 
with her. She was dressed in black, her heavy black 
veil thrown over her shoulders, and the noble face 



giving cheer to the little children who were to pull 
the veil cord. Both children were dressed in white, 
tluir white laces and waxen curls producing the 
strongest contrast with the devoted widow of Stone- 
wall Jackson. The writer occupied a position that 
could not have been unproved for the sight, and, med- 
itating upon it all, he thought much of whether he 
would not give his life, if by so doing all the South 
could have the comfort of the scene. 

At the signal little Julia Jackson Christian pulled 
the cord, and the magnificent figure of the Christian 

soldier ,-t 1 as if in life, 'mid the shouts of thousands 

who followed him to the death, and other thousands 
of women, maidens, and young men who had grown 
up in the faith that a greater soldier than Stonewall 
Jackson had never gone to battle. The bright child 
who exclaimed, "I underveiled it," was frightened by 
the noise of cannon, musketry, and human voices 
that followed her act. 

The hospitality of the people was remarkable. The 
pride and gratitude that their little town among the 
hills was the home and the burial place of Lee and 
Jackson was enough to bestir the entire people to the 
utmost to make every visitor a guest. The writer was 
fortunately assigned to the delightful home of Mr. 
McDowell. 

Every old soldier present must have wished that he 
had served under Stonewall Jackson. The negro men 
of the town who had the honor of being taught by 
him in his Sunday-school, when boys, were proud of 
it. One practical old man of the town, in comment- 
ing upon him as teacher at the Institute, said he was 
never proud of him until the Sunday that he started 
for the war. Then, dressed in military uniform, with 
spurs and on horseback, he seemed to be exactly in 
the proper place. 



RECOLLECTIONS 
JACKSON. 



OF STONEWALL 



UK. .1. W.M. JONES 

It seems fitting in this connection to give reminis- 
cences of Gen. Jackson, by Dr. J. Wm. Jones, who 
was first to write and commend the CONFEDERATE 
VETERAN through its prospectus. It was written at 
the time referred to above for the Atlanta Journal: 

" 1 have to-day, after a lapse of thirty years, a very 
vivid recollection of his appearance, and how he im- 
pressed inc. 

" Pressed in a simple Virginia uniform, apparently 
about thirty-seven years old, six feet high, medium 
size, gray eyes that seemed to look through you, light 
brown hair, and a countenance in which deep benev- 
olence seemed mingled with uncompromising stern- 
ness, he impressed me as having about him nothing 
at all of 'the pomp and circumstance' of war, but 
every element which enters into the skillful leader, 
and the indomitable, energetic soldier, who was al- 
ways ready for the fight. 

"At First Manassas Jackson won the soubriquet of 
' Stonewall,' which has supplanted his proper name, 
and will cleave to him forever. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



109 



"The chivalric and heroic Bee, who had been 
steadily borne back all of the morning, and his little 
handful of brave followers nearly swept away by the 
blue waves wliich threatened to overwhelm everything 
before them, rode up to Jackson and exclaimed al- 
most in despair: 'General, they arc beating us back.' 
'No, sir.' said Jackson, bis eyes fairly glittering be- 
neath the rim of his old cadet cap, 'they shall not 
heat us hack. We will give them the bayonet.' 

"It was then that Bee, about to yield up his noble 
life, galloped hack to the scattered remnant of his 
command and rallied them by exclaiming, 'Here 
stands Jackson like a stone wall! Rally behind the 
Virginians! Lei us determine to die here and we 
shall conquer! ' 

"And thus was the name of the heroic Bee linked 
forever with that of 'Stonewall'- 

"•1 'f the few immortal names, 

That were qoI born to die.' 

■ But the soubriquet given was as inappropriate as 

can be imagined. Jackson was more like a cyclone, a 
tornado, a hurricane, than a stone wall. 

"Jackson was accustomed to keep his plans secret 
from his stall' and his higher officers, as well as from 
the people, and once said, 'If I can deceive our own 
people 1 will be sure to deceive the enemy as to my 
plans.' 

" It was a very common remark in his corps : 'If the 
Yankees are as ignorant of this move as we are, old 
.lack has them.'" 

Ills QUI! K hi I tSION 'ND 1 RISP ORDERS. 

"Jackson was noted for the quickness with which 
he decided what to do, and his short, crisp orders on 
the battlefield. 

"I happened to be sitting on my horse near by, 
when Col. A.S. Pendleton, of Jackson's staff, rode up to 
Gen. Early, al Cedar Run, and touching Ins hat cpii- 
ctly said: 'Gen. Jackson sends compliments to Gen 
Early, and says advance on the enemy and you will 
be supported by Gen. Winder.' 

"'Gen. Early's compliments to Gen. Jackson, and 
tell him 1 will d'i it,' was the laconic reply, and thus 
the battle opened. 

"On the eve of another battle a staff officer rude up 
t" Jackson and said: 'Gen. Ewell sends his compli- 
ments and says he is ready.' 'Gen, Jackson's compli- 
ments t" lien. Ewell, and tell him to proceed,' was 
the quiet reply. And sn.cn the noise of the conflict 
was heard. At ('"Id Harbor, on the memorable 27th 
of June. 1861, after he had gotten his corps in position, 
the great chieftain spent a few moments m earnest 
prayer, and then said quietly to one of his stall': 'Tell 
Gen. Ewell to drive the enemy.' Sunn the terrible 
shock was joined, and he sat quietly on his sorrel 
sucking a lemon and watching through his glasses the 
progress of the fight. Presently a staff officer of Gen 
Ewell galloped up and exclaimed : Mien. Ewell says, 
sir. that it is almo.-t impossible for him tec advance 
further unless the battery (pointing to it 1 is silence, 1.' 
'Go tell Maj. Andrews to bring sixteen pieces of artil- 
lery to bear on that battery and silence it immediately,' 
was t he prompt reply. 

"Soon the battery was silenced. 'Now,' he said, 
'tell (Jen. Ewell to drive them,' and right nobly did 
Ewell and his gallant men obey the order. When ecu 
his great Hank movement at Chancellorsville. Gen. 
Fitz Lee sent for him to ascend a hill from which he 
could view the enemy's position, he merely glanced at 



it once, when he formed his plan and said quickly to 
an aide: 'Tell my column tec cross that road.' 

".lust before he was wounded at Chancellorsville he 
gave to A. P. Hill the order: -Press them and cut 
them off from the United States ford.' and as he was 
borne off the field bleeding, mangled, and fainting, he 
roused himself to give, with something of his old tire, 
his last order: 'Gen. Pendleton, you must hold your 
posil ion.' " 

HIS UIi. II' DISCIPl INE. 

•■ He was very stern and rigid in his discipline, ami 
would not tolerate for a moment the slightest devia- 
tion from the letter of his orders. He put Gen. Gar- 
nett under arrest for ordering a retreat at Kernstown, 
although his ammunition was exhausted and his 
brigade was about ;■> be surrounded, preferred ch 
against him, and was prosecuting them with utmost 
rigor when the < lhancellorsville campaign opened. He 
insisted that Gen. Garnett should have held hi- posi- 
tion with the bayonet: that the enemy would have 
retreated if he had not. and 'that under no circum- 
stances should Garnett have fallen back without orders 
from him (Jackson). After the death of Jackson, 
Gen. Lee. without further trial of tie case, restored 
Gen. Garnett to the command of his brigade, and this 
brave soldier fell in the foremost of Pickett'- famous 
charge ecu the heights of Gettysburg. A brigadier 
.in., galloped up to Jackson, in the midst < » t' battle. 
ami -aid: 'Gen. Jackson, did you order me tec. barge 
that battery.'' pointing to it. 'Yes, sir, I did. Have 
you obeyed the' order.'' 'Why, no, General; 1 
thought there musl be some mistake. My brigade 
would be annihilated, literally annihilated, sir, 11 we 
should moveacross that field.' 'Gen. ,'said .lack- 
son, his eyes Hashing tire ami his voice and manner 
betraying excitement, and • 1 . ' I always try to 
take care of my wounded and bury my dead. Obey 
that order, sir. ami do it at once.' 

I heard one day. on the' Valley campaign, a collo- 
quy betwei 11 Jackson and a colonel commanding one 
of 'his brigades. Jackson said, quietly: '1 thought, 

Col. . that tie- orders were for you to move in the 

rear instead of in the front of Gen. Elzey's brigade 
this morning.' 'Yes, I know that, General; but my 

fellows W'le- ready before Elzey's, and I thought it 
would be bad to k'ecp them waiting, and that it really 
made no difference anyhow.' 'I want you to under- 
stand, colonel,' was the almost tierce re] civ. 'that you 
must obey my orders first and ri'asecn about them after- 
wards. Consider yourself under arrest, sir. and march 
to the rear of your brigade.' Jackson put (Jen. A. P. 
Hill under arrest (for a cause that was manifestly 
unjust) on the Second Manassas campaign, and he 
probably put more officers under arrest than all other 
of our generals combined. There is no doubt that 
Jackson was sometimes t" 11 severe, and that he was not 
always just, and yet it would have greatly increased 
the discipline and" efficiency of our service if other- of 
our Confederate leaders had had more of this sternness 
and severity towards delinquents." 

HIS ATTKNTION TO MINUTE DETAILS. 

"He was unceasingly active in giving his personal 
attention to the minutest details. He had an inter- 
view with his quartermaster, his commissary, his ord- 
nance, and his medical officer every day. and he was 
at all times thoroughly familiar with the condition of 
these departments. It is a remarkable fact that, de- 



no 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



spite bis rapid marches, be rarely ever destroyed any 
public [property, or left bo much as a wagon wheel to 
the enemy. 

"Not content with simply learning what his maps 
could teach him of the country and its topography, 
he was accustomed to have frequent interviews with 
citizens, and to reconnoiter personally the country 
through which he expected to move, as well as the 
ground on which he expected to fight. Being called 
to his quarters one day to give him some informal ion 

c :erning a region with which I had been familiar 

from boyhood, 1 - i found out that he knew more 

about its topography than I did, and I was constrained 
to say, ' Excuse me, General, I have known this sec- 
tion all my life, and thought 1 knew all about it: but 
it is evident that you know more about it than 1 do, 
and that I can give you no information at all.' 

"Often at night, when the army was wrapped in 
sleep, he would ridi oul alone to inspect roads by 
which, on the morrow, he expected to move to strike 
the enemy in Hank or rear. 

"After all, the i rowning glory of Jackson, as it was 
also. > I' Lee, was his humble, simple-hearted piety, his 
firm trust in Christ as his personal Savior, his godly 
walk and conversation, and hi- life of active effort for 
the good of others. * ;;: * Suffice it to say, that 
as I saw him frequently at preaching or at the prayer- 
meeting drinking in the simple truths of the gospel, 
heard him lead the devotions of his ragged followers 
in prayers that 1 have rarely heard equalled and never 
surpassed in fervid appropriateness, knew of his active 
efforts tor the- spiritual good of the soldiers, and con- 
versed with him on the subject of personal religion, 1 
was fully satisfied that this' stem soldier not only de- 
serves a place beside Col. Gardner, and Gen. Hancock, 
and ('apt. Vicars, and other Christian soldiers of the 
century, but that the world has never seen an unin- 
spired man whodeserves higher rank as a true Chris- 
tian. 

"1 recall here just two incidents. In the early 
-priiiL'of 1863 1 was one day walking from our camp 
to a meeting of our chaplains' association, when I 
heard the clatter of horses' hoot's behind me, and, 
turning my head, recognized Gen. Jackson riding 
along as was his frequent custom. As he came up we 
saluted, and he asked if I was going to the chaplains' 
meeting, and. receiving an affirmative response, he at 
once dismounted and. throwing his bridle over his 
arm, walked with me about two miles. 

"I shall never forget that walk of the humble 
preacher with the great soldier. Military matters were 
rarely alluded to, and when I would introduce them 
he would promptly change the conversation. We 
talked of the recently organized chaplains' association, 
and how to make 1't more efficient; of the need ol 
more chaplains and other preachers in the army, and 
how t<» secure them ; of the best way of procuring and 
circulating Bibles and religious literature; of certain 
officers and men in whose salvation he felt peculiar in- 
terest, and for whom hi' asked that I would join him 
in special prayer and effort; of the necessity of hav- 
ing chaplain-' -tick to the post of duty even more 
faithfully than other officers and men, and other kin- 
dred topic-. And then we got on the subject of per- 
sonal piety, the obstacles to its growth in the army 
and the best means of overcoming them, and as he 
quoted readily, and applied aptly some of the mosl 
precious promises of Cod's word, I almost imagined 



that 1 was talking, instead of to this grim -on of Mars, 
to one of the grand old preacher- of the olden time 
who knew nothing about ' new theology.' hut was con- 
tent to follow implicitly the word of God, and to -in:.' 
n ith the spirit and the understanding. 

•' 1 may now hardy allude to his glorious death, the 
! sequence to hi- noble lite of simple trust ami 
self-sacrificing toil in the vineyard of the Lord. Cut 
down in tie execution of what he regarded a- the 
most successful military movemenl of hi- life, shot by 
hi- own men, who would have died rather than will- 
ingly harmed a button on hi- old gray coat, hi- brill- 
iant career ended in the full tide of h i - ai n hit ion - a ml 
hope- of future service for the land and cause he loved 
-o well, he could yet calmly -ay to weeping friends 
who stood around. ' It i- all right. I would not have 
it otherwise if 1 could. 1 had hoped to live to serve 
in\ country, hut it will he infinite gain to he trans- 
planted and live with Christ.' And in his delirium. 
after saying with the old lire of battle, 'Pass the in- 
fantry rapidly to the front.' ' Tell A. I'. Hill to prepare 
for action,' 'Tell Maj. Hawkins to send forward rations 
for the men.' a peaceful -mile passed over hi- placid 
countenance, and his last word- were. 'Let US cross 
over tin- river and rest under the shade of the tree-.' 

"And this great man died! Nay. he did not die! 
The weary, worn manlier went into bivouac — the 
hero of a hundred battles won his last victory, and 
went to wear his 'crown of rejoicing,' his fadeless 
laurels of honor, and heaven and earth alike have 
echoed the plaudit : 

•"Servant of God, well done; 
Res! from thy loved employ, 
The battle's fought, thy victory's won. 
Enter tny Master's Joy ! ' " 



/ 
THOUGHTS SUGGESTED BY A PICTlllE. 



BY I. C. TAYLOR. 



The sun had set iii all his glory 

i 1'er a field of ice and snow, 
i t'er a field stained red mid gory 

With the life-hl 1 of the foe. 

There on a drift of snow transplanted 

Was the banner of the braw, 
Pointing upward, ever upward, 

Like the cause it could not save. 

The snow- white tiel.l bright red was dyed 
With the life-blood of their country b pride, 

Men who hail shown tin involves so Inave 
Now passed to glory and the grave. 

Three cheers for the glorious ensign, 

Anil three for the cause divine. 
And three for I. ee's brave soldier hoys 
Who (ought but all in vam. 

And that banner pointing upward, 

Kver upward to the sky, 
Borne by an angel's small white hand 

Shall he token of our Southern land, 
And shall keep afresh the memory 

« M that gloriOUS hand of Lee. 

The foregoing was written by a youth when four- 
teen. The author is the son of Mr. ('. A. Taylor, of 
Richmond (Passenger Agent Ii., F. & 1'. R. It- 1. who, 

though scarce of gray hairs, is a Confederate veteran. 



Don't fail to see the supplement to this issue. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. in 

STORY OF AN EPITAPH l.x MEMO RI AM OF COL. BENJ. F. TERRY. 



Soon after the fall of Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston 
at the battle of Shiloh and the transfer <>f his remains 
to New Orleans, a lady visiting the cemetery found 
pinned to a rough board that rested on the temporary 
tomb the following beautiful epitaph. It was written 
in a delicate hand with a pencil, and the rain had 
nearly obliterated the characters, but she made a 
verbatim copy of the manuscripl and sent it to one of 
the New Orleans papers with the request that it' fu- 
sible the name of the author should lie published. 
This was gladly done, and the exquisite lines went 
the rounds of the press of this country and England 
as a model of English composition. Lord Palmerston 
pronounced it "a modern classic, Ciceronian in its 
language." Public curiosity being aroused, the au- 
thorship was traci, 1 to John Dimitry, a young native 

of New Orleans, and a - f Alexander Dimit ry, w ho 

before the war occupied a distinguished position in 
the State Department at Washington. Young Dim- 
itry, though only a boy, served in Johnston's army at 
Shiloh, and on visiting New Orleans and the grave of 
his dead chieftain wrote the lines on the inspiration 
of tin- moment ami modestly pinned them mi the 
headboard as the only tribute he could oiler. When 
the question arose conci rning the form of epitaph to 
he placed on the monument erected to the memory of 
the dead Confederate General the committee of < iti- 
zens in charge, with one voice, decided upon this, and 
it is now inscribed upon the broad panel at the base 
of the statue. — Exchange. 

IN MEMORY. 

Beyond tin- stout' is laid. 

Km- a season, 

Albert Sidney Johnston, 

A Qeneral in the Army »>f the Confederate States, 

Wile fell :it Shiloh. Ti iin.ss, e, 

on Hi, sixth day of April, A. l>.. 

Eighteen hundred and sixty-two; 

A Hem tiint in many high offices 

And critical enterprises, 

Ami found faithful in nil. 

Ells life was one long sacrifice of interest to conscience ; 

And even 1 ha I life, on a woeful Sa!>t>al h. 

Did he yield as a hoioeausi ai ins country's ueed. 

Not wholly understood was he while he In ed ; 

But, in his death, his greatness stands confi ^,,1 m a people's tears. 

Resolute, moderate, clear of envy, yet not wanting 

In his lion,,]- impregnable ; 

In his simplicity— sublime. 

No country e'er had a truer sou uo cause a nobler champion ; 

No people a bolder defender -no principle a purer victim 

Than the dead Boldier 

Who s|,.^ps here. 

The cause for which he perished is lost — 

The people for whom he fought are crushed 

The hopes in which he trusted are shattered— 

riii' tlag he loved guides do more the charging lues, 

But his tame. isi^n,,i t,, the keeping of that time, wnich, 

Happily, is not so much the tomb of virtue as its shrine, 
Shall, in the years to come, tire modest worth to noble ends. 

In i 101 1 or. now. our great ea plain rests ; 
A bereaved people mourn him, 

Three com n wealths proudly claim him 

And history shall eherish him 

Among those ,-i 10 ieer spirits who. holding their conscience unmixed 

with blame, 

Have hern, in all eonjeet ures. true to themselves, their country, 
and their God. 



BY W. If. GILLELAND, OF AUSTIN, TEXAS. 



The war stce.1 is champine los bit with disdain, 

And wild is the flash of Ins eye 
As he waves to the wind his dark, flowing inane, 
Starts, neighs, while the slnuits and the bugler's refrain 

Proclaim that the battle is nigh ! 

Charge! charge! And the Ranger Hies fast on his steed, 
Bold Terry! the fearless and brave; 

His troops ,, M his trail are moving with speed, 
And each has crowned his name with a </..,/ 
That story nr sunt; will engrave! 

He swept to the Held with an eye of delight, 

At the head of his hra\ e, chosen band, 

As a meteor's course, 'mid the storms of the night, 
80 splendidly shone his form in the fight, 
And sunk down with a glory as grand. 

lie fought for the latnl of his kindred and birth, 

Not for fame— though it s laurels are won; 
His thoughts ha 1 ber, a holier worth 

Than the trumpet's in claim, which tells In the earth 
"Of die man!" not th deeds hi has done. 

The lightning that burs) "ti tin warrior's head. 

From the to,- that outnumbered ins band, 
Deterred not ins course, as thro' columns he sped, — 

And left on his pathway the dying and dead. 

That had yielded their breath to Ins brand. 

The thunders of battle are hush'd on the plain, 

And the wild cry of carnage is o'er. 
Park vultures are gazing from high at the slain, 

\ml the earth 'hank the blood from the dark purple vein 
That thrilled to life's |,.issioiis before. 

Bat tear-drops of grief dim the eyes <>f the brave, 

For their lion in death is laid low. 

Their banners in Bable above him they wave, 

And inutile their drums in his march to the grave, 
To the music and language of woe. 

The Magnolia City laments for the dead. 
Through w hos, stret tS his gay ha 11 tiers he hore 
1 fu a far distant land— but low lies his head, 
\ 1 t columns shall rise on the fields where he hied, 

Ami freemen his memory adore. 




generous breast, 



Houston. Texas, is called the Magnolia City. 
fOol. Terry was killed in Kentucky In 1861. 

Col. Terry was the First Colonel of Tern- Texas 
Rangers. 

Jefferson Davis and Abraham Lincoln were horn 
in Kentucky, in 1808and L 809, respectively; both left 
their native State in childhood's days; one emigrated 
North, the other South; both served in the Indian 
wars of the West, both commenced their political life 
about the same time, being Presidential Electors in 
the election of 1844, Paris for Polk and Lincoln for 
Clay: I, nth were elected to Congress al'.nit the same 
time, 1845 or 1846, and were in the same year, and al- 
most the same day, elected to preside over their re- 
spective governments — one as President of the United 
States, the other as President of the Confederate States 

of America. — Exchange . 



112 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



£Tic (Tonfcdcvittc Veteran. 

Fifty Cents a Year. 8. A. CUNNINGHAM, Editor 

Office at The American, Corner Church and Cherry Sts. 

This publication is the personal property of S. A. Cunningham. 
Money paid for it does not augment the Monument Fund directly, 
but as an auxiliary its benefit certainly makes it eminently worthy 
the patronage of every friend of the cause. 

SUGGESTIONS TO SUBSCRIBERS. 

I>on"t luiy pi tstotliee order* for sm:il] amounts, postage stamps or 
postal notes are better, being less expensive. In sending stamps lei 
them be of two cents each, One cent stamps are admissible, but 
lamer are inconvenient. In sending clubs, where the work is com- 
plimentary, as it so generally is, deduct cost of exchange. 

Exchanges need not send regular issues. Such as have notices 
are requested. Comrades and frieuds who are zealous for the i'h.n- 
fedekate Vktekan can do it a valuable service by disabusing the 
minds of indifferent persons who think it is specially for old soldiers, 
and assuring them it is of to-day, pulsating with full life in accord 
with the times. Its purpose is to show the ssouth in a true light, and 
to honor those who sacrificed property, comfort, and often life, 
through their devotion to principle. 



The gray and the lilue are terms as indicating the 
spirit of the Veteran by correspondents. It is some- 
times delicately suggested that the Veteran be surely 
gray. Come, brother, don't worry about that. This 
publication shall continue to be as gray as the century- 
burned granite. It is impossible for it to be otherwise 
while a sane mind directs this pen. It will control 
every influence possible in the way of honor and good- 
will to our fellows — our noble women included — and 
it will stop short of nothing in declaring our merit to 
the respect and the pride of all true Americans, but 
it is absolutely without bitterness toward the other 
side, and it will gladly honor their brave, true men. 
In our last issue due credit was given Lieut. Hitchcock, 
who was a Sergeant and performed a heroic feat for 
the Union at Gettysburg. He was worthy then as well 
as now. While about to return to his command from 
the field hospital, a few days after that, he cut his 
double blanket in two and gave half to a wounded 
comrade, and before he got from the hospital he 
saw a Confederate badly wounded in the knee and 
shivering as he lay under a tree, when oil' went the 
remaining part of his blanket to warm "Johnnie Reb." 
Nobody has complained on this line. 

Yes, we are too far away now for any bitterness. 
The Veteran will vindicate the truth of history at all 
hazards, but its mission is fraternal. Why, it is 
thirty years within a few days since Stonewall Jack- 
son finished a career that made his fame immortal 
throughout Christian civilization, and we who fin- 
ished the fight, even in defeat, and have persisted all 
these succeeding decades in the maintenance of good 
government, have no inclination ever to stir strife 
again. True, we would " turn all rascals out," but we 
seek peace along with good to our common country. 



To every friend of this Confederate Veteran this 
statement is commended : It is in your power to estab- 
lish it permanently on a safely paying basis within a 
fortnight. Induce somebody to send an advertisement 
for a year. Professional cards will lie published at $5 
a year. The space of an inch will lie given fur Sid a 
year. Any business that appeals to every part of the 
South for patronage can be well advertised in it. Write 
to anybody who advertises and tell them that South- 
ern people have shown a determination beyond pre- 
cedent to sustain it, and that it will give them special 
favor while advertising their wans to put it in the 
Veteran. It is so well printed that everything is 
read with more than the usual care. Let us all stand 
together and patronize those who patronize our patri- 
otic organ. You can help this movement by a letter, 
even if a farmer and remote from any railroad. 



The Nashville Sunday Times is publishing a series of 
articles on the war. One of a current issue is headed, 
" The Lottery of War had no Blank Cartridges for Gen. 
Gordon's Sixth Alabama Regiment." The article con- 
tains one of the good pictures of that hero's scarred face. 



In this issue of the Veterak, while republishing 
several of the leading articles that appeared in the 
first issue, it seems opportune to copy from a letter 
to Mrs. Stonewall Jackson, received in Richmond May 
6, 1863: 

"At. midnight, on Saturday night, his men being 
drawn up in line of battle, a body of troops was seen 
drawn up a short distance in advance of our line. It 
being doubtful whether they were friends or enemies 
Gen. Jackson and star!' rode forward to ascertain. 
Whilst he was engaged in reconnoitering, his men be- 
ing unaware of his movement, mistook himself and 
staff for enemies and tired a volley into them, in- 
stantly killing one of his staff and severely wounding 
Gen. Jackson anil Mai. Crutchfield. One bullet passed 
through the General's right hand, whilst another 
struck his left arm below the elbow ami, ranging up- 
ward, shattered the bone near the shoulder. He in- 
stantly fell to the ground. His brother-in-law, who 
was with him, laid down beside him to ascertain the 
nature of his wounds. In a moment the unknown 
troops in front, who proved to be the enemy, advanced 
and captured two other staff officers who were stand- 
ing over the General without noticing him. Soon 
after, four of our men placed him on a stretcher, and 
were bearing him to the rear, when they were all shot 
down. The injury to his right hand is severe, one of 
the bones having been shot away, but it is believed he 
will ultimately recover its use. It is a source of re- 
gret to know that his invaluable services must be lost 
to the country for a long time. More than all, it is 
painful to know that he fell beneath the arms of his 
own gallant followers. While the malicious, angry 
bullets of the Yankees were unable to reach him. 'a 
chance volley and a mistake have laid low the hero of 
the country ami the age.'" 

This letter was published in Chattanooga May 10, 
and the paper containing it was preserved by Gen. O. 
P. Strahl, whose glorious career ended in the battle of 
Franklin, and furnished me, with many other private 
and published papers, by his sister, Mrs. Sigler, in 
Kansas. 



/ 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



IJ 3 



The story of Mr. Green, an published in the last 
Veteran, about going to the bed-room of Gen. Sher- 
man, at Jackson, Miss., after its evacuation by Gen. 
Johnston, recalls interesting reminiscences. It is a 
very probable story, even unsupported by the author's 
reputation for integrity. A retreating army, com- 
pelled t<> abandon valuable territory, scarcely used 
any strategy in the rear of its columns. 

Gen. Sherman could well enough sleep unguarded 
in Jackson at that time. Desolate place it was! I 
walked for a mile or more in its principal streets 
during the seige without seeing a white inhabitant, 
and but one old negro man. The houses, in many 
instances, were open, and elegant furniture was scat- 
tered through the yard, efforts to remove it being 
abandoned after the beginning. It was almost as sad 
;i picture hi' desolation as was a battlefield after both 
armies had gone. 1 was in a former evacuation of 

Jackson when. with. ml an hour's warning hardly, the 

citizens fled with the retreating Confedi rates pell-mell 
through hard rain. 



But it was 'it' the last evacuation thai 1 have prom- 
ised tn write. After a \\ eek's siege, the powerful I 
that had captured Vicksburg pressed Johnston at 
Jackson until his withdrawal became necessary. 
During the six successive days of this great cot 
many prisoners were captured by desperate Confeder- 
ates, and we were successful in securing various flags 
of regiments, but reinforcements continued until 
they confronted us to Pearl River above and below, 
and were about to flank us across that river. My com- 
mand was under severe fire of sharpshooters, who se- 
cured positions in pallatial residences near our lines, 
and which we were compelled to burn t" get rid of 

them. 



As one of fifty volunteers from my regiment, the 
Forty-first Tennessee, to advance ourskirmish lii 
pay high tribute to Spencer Eakin, the officer in ch 
for his undaunted courage, which animated afresh our 
spirits while holding positions all that long August 
day on the south side of a plank fence in open field. 
Eakin was young, with face as fair as the maiden- we 
left at home, but he Beemed to have no knowledge of 
fear, and to he void of depression through our severest 
trials. We did not all survive that awful day. 



I was assistant to the officer in charge of the skir- 
mishers the night we stole away. My regiment cov- 
ered the retreat over a large part of the front. We 
were deployed along the same line that Eakin's vol- 
unteers had established, not over three hundred yards 
in front of our temporary breastworks, and though 
the stillness was as death, our army moved away so 
quietly that our skirmishers, as a rule, knew nothing 
of it. It was my memorable duty to crawl along this 



skirmish line and whisper to the men the instructions 
about how t" move on the retreat. Each soldier was 
to follow the movement of the man to his right. 

My opportunity for judging the characteristii 
my fellows on this in is utilized in the state- 

ment that while one man would be sound asleep as 
ever he was in the babyhood cradle, another would 
hardly breathe sufficiently in his intense anxiety. 
This fact i- stated not in praise of the one and in con- 
demnation of the other. The man with steadier 
nerves and less fear had yielded to nature's demands 
and slept, but he would have been as valliant if 
aroused as hi- most watchful companion. 

When we L'"t back t" tin works, each moving by 
tin- man to his right, whether by the flank oral 
to the "about my were astonished to find the 

army gone. We missed our way to the Pearl River 
bridge, and when we finally reached it near sunrise 

tin w len structure had heel fire, bu1 v 

rived in time to escapi • it. 



I \ sending this issue to personal acquaintances who 
ived a copy heretofore the hope is modestly 
expressed that its merits will bi and that 

old friend- will not lie indifferent t" an enterpi 
zealously advocated by those who don't even know 
the author. Some who have manifi d for the 

monument cause have been strangely silent to this 
power f"i organization and mouthpiece fur all of our 
people furnished at individual expense. They must 
fail to understand the situation, or they would unite 
their influence and give their half dollar toward the 
permanent establishment of the most universally pop- 
ular organ yet issued in behalf of our common inter- 
ests. 



Tin John B Gordon in 

behalf of the United Confederate Veterans is repub- 
lished in this issue. That appeal i.- now earnestly 
commended to veterans everywhere. It certainly de- 
serves consideration from all organizations not mem- 
The accessible place for meeting this year — 
Birmingham — makes it desirable that every friend of 
the organization make known its high merits to 
(amps. Bivouacs, Lines, etc., with a view to as com- 
plete unification as possible. 

In this connection every friend of the Confederate 
Veteran is requested to report organizations not 
listed in this publication. It seeks to serve all alike. 



Protest was made against the plea in the last Vet- 
eran for our old slaves, but another letter from the 
same source said: "Perhaps you are right." The en- 
actment of such a law as was suggested would do much 
good t" worthy old black folks, and it would be very 
helpful to those who will always care for them anyhow. 



H4 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



UNITED CONFEDERATE VETERANS. 



The first article of the constitution of the associ- 
ation declares: " The object and purpose of this organ- 
ization will be strictly social, literary, historical, and 
benevolent. It will endeavor to unite in a general 
federation all associations of the ( lonfederate veterans, 
soldiers and sailors, now in existence or hereafter to 
be formed; to gather authentic data for an impartial 
history of the war between the State-: to preserve the 
relics or mementoes of the same; to cherish the ties 
dt' friendship that exist among the men who have 
shared common dangers, common suffering, and pri- 
vations; to care for the disabled and extend a helping 
hand t" the needy; to protect the widow and orphan 
and to make and preserve the record of the services of 
every member, and as far as possible of those of our 
comrades who have preceded us in eternity." 

Th% last article provides that neither discussion of 
political or religious subjects, nor any political action, 
>hall be permitted in the organization, and any asso- 
ciation violating that provision shall forfeit its mem- 
bership. 

Gen. -I . I'>. Gordon, the Commander of the Veterans, 
in an address to the soldiers and sailors, said: 

"Comrades, no argument is needed to secure for 
those objects your enthusiastic indorsement. They 
have burdened your thoughts for many years; you 
have cherished them in sorrow, poverty, and humil- 
iation. In the face of misconstruction you have held 
them in your hearts with the strength of religious 
convictions. Xo misjudgments can defeat your 
peaceful purposes for the future. Your aspirations 
have been lifted by the mere force and urgency of 
surrounding conditions to a plane far above the paltry 
consideration of partisan triumphs. Tic In. nor of 
the American government, the just powers of the 
Federal government, the equal rii_dits of States, the 
integrity of the Constitutional Union, the sanctions 
of law and the enforcement of order have no class of 
defenders more true and devoted than the ex-soldiers 
of tin' South ami their worthy descendants. But you 
realize the great truth that a people without the mem- 
ories of heroic sull'ering or sacrifice are a people with- 
out a history. 

" To cherish such memories ami recall such a past, 
whether crowned with success or consecrated in defeat, 
is to idealize principle and strengthen character, in- 
tensify love of country, and convert defeat ami disas- 
ter into pillars of support lor future manh 1 and no- 
ble womanhood. Whether the Southern people, under 
their changed conditions, may ever hope to witness 
another civilization which shall equal that which be- 
gan with their Washington and ended with their Lee, 
it i- certainly true that devotion to their glorious past 
is not only the surest guarantee of future progress and 

the holiest liond of unity, hut is also the strongest 
claim they can present to t he confidence and respect 
of the other sections of the Union. 

"In conclusion, 1 beg to repeat, in substance at 
least, a few thoughts recently expressed by me to the 
State organization, which apply with equal force to 
this general brotherhood. 

" It is political in no sense, except so far as the word 



'political' is a synonym of the word 'patriotic' It is 
a brotherhood over which the genius of philanthropy 
and patriotism, of truth and of justice, will preside; 

■ if philanthropy, because it will succor the disabled, 

help the needy, strengthen the weak, and cheer the 

disconsolate; of patriotism, because it will cherish the 
past glories of tic dead Confederacy and transmute 
them into living inspirations for future service to the 
living republic; of truth, because it will seek to gather 
ami preserve as witnesses for history the unimpeach- 
able facts which shall doom falsehood to die that truth 
may live; of justice, because it will cultivate National, 
as well as Southern, fraternity, and will condemn 
narrow-mindedness and prejudice and passion, and 
cultivate thai broader, higher, and nobler sentiment, 
which would write mi the grave of' every soldier who 
fell on our side. ' Here lie- an American hero, a mar- 
tyr to the right as his conscience conceived it.' 

"1 rejoice that a general organization, too long Deg- 
Lected, has at last been perfected. It is an organizaf ion 
which all honorable men must approve and which 
Heaven itself will bless. I call upon you, therefore, 
to organize in every State ami community where ex- 
Confederates may reside, and rally to the support of 
the high and peaceful objects of the United Confed- 
erate Veterans, ami move forward until by the power 
of organization and persistent effort your beneficent 
ami Christian purposes are fully accomplished." 



UNITED CONFEDERATE VETERAN ('AMI'-. 
ALABAMA. 



POSTOPFICE. CAMP. 

Bessemer Bessemer. 

Birmingham W.J. Hardee 38 

Eutaw Sanders 6J 

Mobile Raphael Semmes.... It 



NO. OFFICERS. 

157... W. R. Jones, N. H.Sewall. 



Montgomery Lomax ... 



lot. 



,F. >s Ferguson, R. F.. Jones, 
.(.'apt. (J. H.Cole, F. II. Mun.ty. 
Capt. Thos. T. Roche, Win. 

Miekle. 

II. 



Mickle. 

.Capt. Emmet Selbels, J. 
Higgins. 



A RKANSAS. 

Alma Cabell.. 202 .. 

Bentonville Cabell 89...Capt. N S. Henry, A. J. Hates. 

IV ■ lie Point .. Mailer 1!1J... 

Cnarleston Pal Cleburne 191... 

Conway leff Davis 213 . 

Faj ettevllle w. II. Brooks 216... 

Fori sin ill, lien T. Duval H6...Capt. I'.T. Devaney, K. M. Fry. 

Greenwood Hen McCullocb 191... 

Hackett City.. Stonewall 199 . 

Hope Gratiot 203 . 

Morrllton Robert W. Harper..2(i7... 

Nashville foe Neal 202... 

Van Buren John Wallace 209... 



FLORIDA 
Brookvllle W. W. Luring 111... 

i Ihlpley. Chipley jit.. 

Dade City Pasco C. v. Ass'n.... 57... 



Fernandlnn Nassau. 

Inverness.., 



..Geo.T. Ward 

Jacksonville R. E. Lee 

Jasper Stewart 



. 58.. 

I... i 



Lake City. Columbia Co 150.. 

Marian na Milton 182. 

Monticello Patton Anderson.... 59.. 

oeala Marion fn.r. V. a 56 

Orlando Orange Co .">!.. 



Palmetto... 

Pensucula.. 
Quincy 



...Geo. T. Ward 58.. 

...Ward C. V. Ass'n lu . 



D. L. Kenan. 



HI). 



Gen. John c Davant, Col. 
Fred L. Robertson. 



Capt John IS. Johnston, A. 

it. Ravesles. 
\v. Naylur Thompson. 
Capt. w. c. Zimmerman, W. 

s. turner. 
Gen. Win. liaya.W.W Turk, r. 

i apt. it. .1. si. -«ari. John E. 

ilanna. 
l'a|it.\V. K. Moore, W. M. Ives. 

Capt. w. D. Barnes, F. Philip. 
W. c. Bird, B. W. Partridge. 

,' apt.. I. J. Finley, Win. Fox. 
Capt. W. H. Jewell, li. M. 
Robinson. 

Japt. J. C. l'elot, . I. W. Nettles. 

Capt. R. J. Jordan, C. V. 

Thompson. 
Capt. R. H. M. Davidson, D. 

M. McMillan. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



"5 



FLORIDA— Continued. 

POSTOFFICK. CAMP. NO. OFFICERS. 

St. Augustine. ..E. Kirby Smith 175 Capt. J. A. Enslow, Jr. 

Sanford Gen. J. Finnegan 149.. .Capt. A. M. Thrasher, C. H. 

Lefler. 

Tallahassee Lamar 161 EL A.. Whitfield 

Tampa Hillsboro 36 i '(. F. W. Merrin.H. L.Crane. 

Tltusvllle. Indian River.. i: C'L J. Prltchett, A. D. Cohen. 

GEORGIA. 

Atlanta Fulton Co., Ga 150 Gen.W L. Calhoun, John F. 

E£d wards. 
Dalton. Jos.E. Johnston i I apt A. F. Etoberts, J. A. 

Blanton. 
Ringgold Ringgold. 

Spring Place.... John B. Gordon 50 Capt. R E.Wilson, W. II. 

Etamsey. 
ILLINi US. 
Chicago Ex-Con Ass'n. v U't. J. W. White, R L. France. 

INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Ard re rohn Bt. Morgan.... 107.. ' apt. J. I.. Gaut, It. Scales. 

McAlester I off I.e.' ,N P.Guy.F B. Coleman. 

KENTUCKY. 

Bowling Green. Bowling Green.. 143 Capt. W. F. Perry, James v. 

Mitchell. 

Cynthiana Ben Desha apt.D. M.Snyder, J.W.Boyd. 

Danville J. Warren Grigsby, .' ; i I apt. i M. Green, iohn M. 

i is ughman. 
Georgetown Geo. W. Johnson 98 Capt. A. H. Sinclair, J. Webb. 
Harrodsburg... William Preston 96 ' apt. B. W. Allln.John Kane. 
Lawrenceburg. Ben Hardin Helm .101 Capt. P. H. Thomas, John P. 

\ a ugh n . 

Lexington r. C. Brecklurldge 100 Gen. J Boyd, G. C. Snyder. 

Mi Sterling Boy a. i iluke 201...Col. Thomas Johnson, W. T. 

lla\ ens. 

Paducah A. P. Thompson 174 ..( 't.W.G. Bullitt, J.M.Brown. 

Paris rohn H.Morgan... 95 .Capt. \. T. Forsylh, Will \. 

Gall 
Richmond. Thomas B. Collins 215 Capt. Jas. Tevls, N. B. Death- 

Russellvllle. .John W. Caldwell 139 Maj. J, B. Brlggs, W. B. Mc- 

1 artj 

Versailles.. Abe Buford 96.. .Capt. Fob. C. Bailey, Russell 

V. Bishop. 

LOUISIAN \ 
Alexandria Feff Davis 6 Gen. Geo. O. Watts, Capt. W. 

W. Whlttington. 
Amite City VmlteCity 78 Capt. A. P. Richards, G. W. 

Bankston. 
Baton Rouge Batou Rougt 17 Gen. John McGrath, F. W. 

II. 1 Minall. 

Berwick Winchester Hall 178 Cap! M. W. Bateman, F, 0. 

Brien. 
DoualdsonvillcMaJ. V. Mauin. IS Capt. S A.Poche, P. G 
Evergreen RL. Gibson 19 Col Wm.W Ewell.I.l Jobn- 

Bon. 
LakeCharles Calcasieu C, Vel 82 Capl W \ Knapp, W. I.. 

Hutchings. 
1,. Pro\ Idence ..Lake I'r-n Idence 198 

Mansfield Mouton II.. Capt. C Bchuler, P.G Pegues. 

Merrick Isaiah Norwood.... 110 1 apt D. T. Merrick, J. Jewell 

faylor. 
Natchitoches.. ..Natchitoches 10 ..Capt. J. Alp. Prudhomme, C. 

!■;. Levy, 
New Orleans ArmyotN.Va I. ..Col. W. R. Lyman, Thos. B. 

O'Brien. 

Now 1 irha us. Army of 'IV n n 2. ..Gen. J. Glynn Jr., N. Cnny. 

New Orleans. Wash. Artillery. 15 Col, B. 1 Eshelman, Lieut.- 

Col. I.. \ Adam. 
New Orleans...., HenrySL Paul.. 16 Gen.Jos. I fomoruelle, Col. M. 

T. Ducros. 

Opelousas EL E. Lee 14.. .Capt. I.. 1' Prescott, Col. II. 

Bloomficld. 
Plaquemine [bervllle 18. ..Capt. ('has. 11. Dickinson, 

John I.. 1 lardenne. 
Rayvllle Richland 152. Capt. John S, Summerlin,0. 

I'. Smith. 
1; u st in Rust In 7...CapLA.Barksdale, J. L. Bond. 

Shreveport' Gen. Leroy Stafford 8...CapL Wm. Kinney,Will H. 

Tunna mI. 

Tangipahoa Camp Moore 80. ..Capt. O. P. Amacker, i;. R, 

Taylor. 



MISSISSIPPI— Con/t 11 



POSTOFFICE. 



CAMP. SO. ..FT I 

Edwar.ls W. A. Montgomery 26.. .Capt. W. A. Montgomery, 11. 

w. Barrett. 
Fayette I. J. Whilney.... 22 Capt. \v. 1.. Stephen, W. K. 

Penny. 
Greenwood Hush A. Elej nolds...218... 

Grenada W. K. Etarksdale 189 

llai: Hattiesburg -'1 Capl Geo. D. Hartfleld, Evan 

it. He 

Holly sprimis K it M,,tt 28 .Capt. 1. F. Fant, s. H. Pryor, 

Jackson. RobL A. Smith 24 .Capt. W.D.Holder, G. S. Green. 

Macon Fas. Longstreet. .. 180...CapLW. H.Foote, J. L. Griggs. 

Meridian Walthall 25 C'L W.F.Brown, B. V.White. 

Miss. City Beauvoir 12 n.1.1; Davis, F S Hi 

Natchez. ...Natchez - euL-Col. F. J. V. Lot ami, 

II.. Hopkins. 
Port Gibson.. Claiborne. 167 Capt. A.K.Jones, W.W.Mo 

Rolling Fori, .Pal I 1< burne. 
Elo8edale Montgomery -' l,! F. A. Montgomery, Chas. 

' I nrar. 
Tupelo John M.Stone 131. ..Gen. John H.Stone, P, M. 

Sli' 

Vlcksburg Vtcksburg 12 Capl I' A.Campbell, C. Davis. 

Woodvllle Woodville I it. .1. n. .1 », P M. 

kett. 
Yazoi "i a/.... Camp 1 D. Robertson, W. R. 

Mel 'utcheon. 4 

MISSOURI. 
Kansas Cltj KansasClty. 80 C't. J. W.Mercer, G. B.SpratL 

NORTH CAROLIN V 
Clinton .. Samps. 1. 11 11 liday, 1 F. Hening. 

1 on. or. 1. . abai rus ' •• . < V.A 

New I". I titan n a in.' 1 I. .1. 1.. Hall. I.. K.W hit oner. 

OKLAHOM \ 

1. ' on. .1. B. ' .or.lon l'ihi 

Oklahoma C'L D. H.Hammon it: .apt. .1. W, Johnston, John 

■ 1. . asler. 

SOUTH CAROLIN \ 

Aiken Barnard E Bee s 4 Capt. H H. Teague. J. N. 

Wigfall. 

SI rgi s St< pi., n Elliott ".1 .1. Otej 1; 

II NNESS1 1 

Chattai ga ..N. B. Forrest 1 Gen. J. P. Shlpp, L. T. Dick- 
on. 

1 pt. I' H. smith, (lay 

iker. 
Fayettei - ford-Fulton... 114 Col. James D. Tillman, W. H. 

< aslnon. 

Franklin Iohn L. McEwen.. Capt. B K. Roberts, If. N. 

[son. 
Jackson John Ingram. Capl 1 - Mallory, S. E. Ker- 

tolf. 

Knoxvllli I llx K. Zolllcoffer...4 pt. Lin I Horn, Chas. 

1 tucloux. 
Knoxville . ..Fred Aull '> Col. Frank A. Moses, Maj. J. 

W. S. 1 1 (. 

Lewlsburg Dibrell..... - 1 pL */. P. Irvine, W. G. 

>yd. 
McKenzli Stom ill Facl pt. Marsh Atklsson, Dr. J. 

I'. ( annon. 

Memphis. His. Ass'n H Col. C. W. Frazer, R.J. Black. 

Mm (n .si, ,,,-,, Joe B. Palmer.. ,. 81. ..1 apt. W. S. McLemore. Wm. 

Led better. 
Nasbvllh Frank Cheatham. 35 Elder R. Lin Cave, Col. John 

I'. Hickman. 

Shelbyvllle Wm. Frlerson v Capl John M. Hastings. Jno. 

... Arnold. 
Tniiai 1.... Pierce B. Anderson I73...Capt. .1. P. Bennett, W. J. 



Thlbodaux.. Braxton Bragg.. 



UNO 



MISSISSIPPI. 

Boonevllle w. 11. 11. Tlsou 179. ..Capt. D. T. Beall.J.W. smith. 

Columbus tsbam Harrison 27... Dr. B. A. Vaughan, W. A. 

Campbell. 
crystal so'gs. Ben Humphreys 19. ..Capt. c. Humphries, .1. M. 

Haley. 



apt. .1. 



Winchester Turney 12 Capt. W. II. isrannan, J. J 



ipt. W. 
Martin. 



TEXAS. 



Abilene Abilene 7.' T. W. Dougherty. 

mi Col. II. I.. Bentley, Theo. 
Ho, 

AH arado Alvarado 160. ..I. EL I'os. y 

Athens Howdy Martin 85 Capt. D M. Morgan, W. T. 

I- list a... 

Atlanta stonewall lackson 91. Capt. J. D. Johnson, James 

N. Simmons. 

Austin TohnBHood 103 Capt. Wm. M. Brown, (has. 

H. Bow oil. 

Beaumont A.S.Johnston 75. ..Capt. Jeff Cbalsson, Tom J. 

Russell. 

Beltow Bell (o. ex-Con As li> (apt. II. M. Cook, R H. Tur- 
ner. 



n6 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



TEX IS ' ' cL 

POSTOKFH K. CAMP. KO. OFFICERS 

Bontiam SulRoss 164 Capt J. P. Holmes. 

Brown wood .... Stonewall Jackson..U8... Capt Carl Vincent, R L. 

a rcber. 
r. B. Robertson 121.. . Capt. H. B.Stoddard, \V. H. 



POSTOI PICE. 



Bryan . 



•ant 
Harmon. 

Buffalo' lap I.. F. Mo Cant Ben F. Jones, .1. J. 

Eubank. 
Calvert W. P. Townsend.. HI Cant. J. n. Drennon, C. W. 

Hlgglnbothain. 
Camerson Ben McCullougb 29. ..Capt K. J. Mclver, Joseph B, 

Moore. 
Cam. .11 lames L. Hogg 133 Capt T. J. Towles, \V. 1). 

Thompson. 

Carthage Horace Randall.. 1S3...J. R Bond, J M. Woolworth. 

Cleburne PatCleburne 88...Capt 0. T. Plummer, M. S. 

Kalll. . 
Colorado Albert Sidney — ...Capt W V. Johnson, Thos. 

<.{. Mullln. 
Columbus Shropshire-Upton. ..112.. I lapt. I ..... Mc( lormlck, J. .i. 

Dick. 
Coleman John Pt-lham 76...Capt J. J. Callan, James M. 

Williams. 
Corpus! :hrlstl...Jos. E. Johnston 63... Capt 11. it Sutherland, U. C. 

Spann. 

Coraicana C. M. Winkler l47...Capt R M. Collins. 

Crocket! Crockett 141. ..Capt Enoch Braxson, J. F. 

Martin. 

cal.lwcii Camp Rogers 142. .J. F. Matthews. 

Dallas Sterling Price 31...Capt .1. .1 Miller, Gen. Wm. 

L. Thompson. 

He. -Miir Ben McCulloch 30. ..Capt Will A. Miller. A. F..1- 

wards. 
Denton sul Ross 128 Capt Hugh McKenzie, J. R. 

Burton. 
Dublin Erath & Comanche. 83 .(Jen. J.T. Harris, I.. E. < ; i 1- 

lett 
Emma Lone star 198 .. 

eld Wm. L.Moody 87. ..('apt. Geo.T. Bradley. L. G. 

San. lifer. 

Farney Camp Bee 130. ..Capt. T. M. Daniel, s. G. 

Fleming. 

Fort Worth R K. Lee 158. ..J. W. Friend, Eugene Burr. 

Frosl R. (i. Mills lim. (apt. V. Chamberlain, Dr. M. 

F. Wakefield. 
Gainesville Jos. E. Johnston lilt., (apt. . I M. Wright, John T. 



'apt. .1 . 
Walker 



Galveston. Magruder 10S...Gen. T. N. Waul, Chris c. 

Beavans. 

Gatesville Ex-C. A. Coryell Co-185 .W. 1.. Saunders. 

Goldthwaite Jell' Davis 117. ..Maj. J. E. Martin,!-'. M.Tav- 

• lor. 

Gonzales Gonzales 156... Ma]. W. B. Savers, M. East-. 

land. 
Graham Young County 127. ..Capt A. T. Gay, Y. M.Ed- 
wards. 
Granbury Granbury ii7...J. A. Formivalt, I. R Morris. 

Hamilton A. S. Johnston 1 Hi .Capt. W. T. Saxon, C. C. 

Powell. 

H. instead Tom Green 130 ..Capt Van li. Thornton, Sam 

Seliwarz. 

Henrietta Sul Ross 172...Capt. F. J. Barrett, C. B. Pat- 
terson. 

Hlllsboro Hill County 166. ..Win. A. Fields. 

Hou-ton Dick Bowling IH7... 

Kaufman Geo. D. Munion 115.. Capt. Jos. Huffmaster, K. s. 

Pi pes. 
Kingston A. s. Johnston 71. ..Capt J. F. Puckett, T. J. Fos- 
ter. 
La.lonia Roht. E. Lee 126. ..Capt G. W. Blakeney, F. W. 

Blakeney. 
LaGrange Col. B. Timmons 61. ..Capt. H. II. Phelps, N. Hol- 

man. 
Lampasas R.K.Lee 60. ..J. S. Lauderdale, D. C. 

Thomas. 
Lubbock F.R.Lubbock 13*. ..Capt. W. D. Crump, G. W. 

Shannon. 

Madlsonvllle Johh G. Walker 128. ..R. Wiley. 

Meridian A. S. Johnston 11a. (apt. Robert Donuell, J. W. 

Adams (acting). 
Merkel Merkel 79. ..('apt. .1. T. Tucker, A. A. 

Baker. 
Mexia Joe Johnston 94. ..Capt c. L. Watson, H. W. 

Williams. 

Mlnneola Wood County 163... Capt J. H. Huflmaster, Geo. 

A Cage. 

Mt Enterprlse.Rosser 82. .. Capt. T. Turner, B. Birdwell. 

Mt Pleasant Coi. Dud Jones 121. ..('apt. c. L. Dlllahunty, J. C. 

Turner. 

Montague Bob stone 93. ..Capt It Bran, It D. Rugeley. 

McKinney Collin County 109. ..Uen. W.M.Bush, II. C. Mack 



TEXAS— Continued. 

CAMP. No. OPl i. I is. 

Navasota Pal Cleburne 102 ..('apt. W. E. Harry. It M. West 

Oakvllle robn Donaldson .. — ... 

Palestine Palestine U...( apt. J. W. Fw Ing, .!. M. Fill- 

lluwlder. 

Palis A. S. Johnston Tli (apt. Geo. H. PrO\ in. . John 

W. W< bb 
Paint Rock.. Jeff Davis 168.. .Capt W. T. Melton. J. W. 

Katchford. 

Rockwall Rockwall 74. ..('apt. M.S. Austin. X. c F.d- 

wards. 

Roiiy w. W. Loiing 151. ..Capt D. 8p er, W. ii. smith. 

San Antonio A. S. Johnston 111. (apt. John s. Ford, Tavlol 

M. I: 

Seymour Bedford Forres! B6 Capt T. H. c. Peery, It J. 

Browning. 

Sherman Mildred Lee. :«> ( lapt .1. T. Wilson, R. Walker. 

Sweetwater. E. C. Walthall 92. (apt. W. D. Beall, J. II. Free- 
man. 
Sulphur Sp'gs. .Matt Ashcroft 170 (aid. R. M. Henderson. M. G. 

Miller. 

Taylor A. s. Johnston 165...Capt M. Ross. p. Hawkins. 

Tyler i..S. Johnston 18. ..Capt James P. Douglas, sid 

s. Johnson. 
Vernon Camp Cabell 125. ..Capt Sbem E. Hatchett, M. 

D. Davis. 
Waxahacliic. let!' Davis MS Capt. R. P. Mackey. W. M. 

McKnight. 
Weathi it. .id ....Tom Green 169...Capt J. P. Rlee, M. v. Klu- 

uison. 
Wichita Falls... W. J. Hardee 73. ..Capt C. R. Crockett, N. A. 

Robinson. 

VIRGINIA. 

li.ams Stat ion.. J. E. B. Stuart 211 

Richmond George E. Picketts..2U4... 

Roanoke William Watts.. ...205 

Williamsburg. .McGrudcr-Kwell . 210... 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Washington Wash, city Con l"l....Maj. Albert Akers. 



Organizations nut members of the United Confed- 
erate Veterans are to lie reported in lull as sunn as in- 
formation is received. There are in Tennessee twenty- 
two Bivouacs, including seven organizations of sons. 



POSTOFFICE. 



HlVOl'AC. 



Columbia Leonidas Polk 

i oil latin Daniel s. Donelson.. 

Troy Warren McDonald 

DiCKSOn lames E. Rains 

Lynchburg Woody B. Taylor ... 

Paris Fitzgerald-Lamb... 

I Dresden Jenkins 

Lebanon R. .licit Hat ton 

Gaiuesboro... s. s. Stanton 

Alamo Joseph E. Johnston 

Trenton 0. F. strahl 

Cookevlllp Pat Cleburne 

Brownsville ...Hiram S. Bradford. 

Harts\ ill. Barksdale 

Riddlclon. . F. I,. Bradley 

McMinnvllle Savage 



OFFICERS. 

Capt. .1. 11. Fussell, W. P. Dobbins. 
.J. W. Blackmore, J A. Trousdale. 

P. J. Cum in ins. Alex. N. Moore. 

i.t. W. J. M.iiins. Lt J. M. Talley. 

(apt. John 1). Tolley, D. P. Allen. 

P. li. hit, A. it Lankford 

c. M. Kwlng, John n. McKeen. 

.A. K. Miller. G. R. Gwynn. 

Col. M. I.. Gore, N. H. Young. 
..J. B. Humphreys, D. B. Dodson. 

.I.e. Mi'lii arnian. Mai. Wm. Gay. 

Capt. Walton Smith, W. P. Chapln. 

c.l. i;,o. ('. Porter. A. D. Bright. 

Col, w. J. Hale Mai. A.s. Reaves. 

Thos. W. Cosby. Sgt B. N. High. 
. — Hackett (officers not reported). 



sons id-' CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS— TENNESSEE DIVISION.. 
POSTOFFICE. BIVOUAC. OFFICERS. 

Winchester Ubert .-. Marks A. H. Marks (Died Sept. il. 1892), .!<> 

('. Garner. 

Nashville Thus, i . Mind man. His Hind man. Jas. F. Hager. 

Clarksvllle \ If red R .bb F. s. Beaumout, ('has. w. smith. 

Gain. si. mo I, s. Ouarles D. H. Morgan, s. H. \ . Young. 

Knowiile L E.B.Stuart 1. W. Green, J. W. ». Frlerson, Jr. 

Franklin W P. Rucker L. W. Buford, l..e s M.F.wen. 

McKenzie Jeff. Davis E. L. Cunningham, J. L. Thonias.m 



The following camps are reported : Henderson i Ky. i. 
Camp Henderson, Maj. M M. Kinnard, Commander > 
Capt. Richard 11. Cunningham, Adjutant. 

It would lie very beneficial it' the reader would see 
to it that any Camp he or she may know of would re- 
port it at once. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



117 



LAST ORDER OF R. E. LEE. 



ATTENTION, WHITWORTH SHARPSHOOTERS. 



Headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, April 
10, 1865. — General Order No. 9.— After four years of 
arduous service, marked by unsurpassed courage and 
fortitude, the Army of Northern Virginia has 
compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and re- 
sources. I need not tell the survivors "f s^ many 
hard-fought battles, who have remained steadfast to 
the last, that I have consented to this result from no 
distrust of them. But feelingthat valor and devotion 
could accomplish nothing that could compensate for 
the loss that would have attended the continuance ol 
tin' contest, 1 determined t<> avoid the sacrifii 
tho.-e whose past services have endeared them to their 
countrymen. 

By the terms of the agreement officers and men can 
return to their homes and remain until exchanged. 
Von will take with you the satisfaction that proceeds 
from the consciousness of duty faithfully performed, 
and 1 earnestly pray that a merciful God will extend 
you his blessing and protection, With an unceas- 
ing admiration of your constancy and devotion to 
your country, and a grateful remembrance of your 
kind and generous consideration tor myself, I hid you 
an affectionate farewell. R. E. Lee, G teral. 



SOUTHERN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



The Confederate Veti ran commends to the pat- 
ronage of all students of the history of the late war 
the Southern Historical Society, headquarters at Rich- 
mond, Va. This society has for its object the noble 
purpose of advancing the truth of history, in the fur- 
therance of which it has published, since 1876, twenty 
volumes of " Papers " of inestimable value. Some of 
these volumes have already become very scarce, com- 
plete sets selling readily for from - $100 when 
they can he had. 

Vol. XV. — Paroles of the Army of Northern Virginia, 
Swrendered at Appomattox Court-house, Apn 19, 1865, 
with Historical Tntroi possesses a singular claim 

to the regard of those whose name- it honorably in- 
cludes. The information is not accessible elsewhere. 

It behooves every one of Fee's last followers to secure 

this volume, to he cherished by his posterity. 

The society possesses much original material of 
great historical importance and interest for an indefi- 
nite continuance of its annual serial, ami the hop, 1- 
cherished that sustenance will not he wanting for the 
just performance of this worthy purpose. Each passing 
year adds to the importance of these publications. 
Distinguished soldiers of both armies in "the war 
between the states" indorse the statement of tic \ 
England Historical and Genealogical Register, that "no 
library, public or private, which aims at a historical 
completeness, can afford to he without these volume-," 

and of the London Saturday Review, that "they contain 
a mass of information relative to our war, without a 
careful study of which no historian, however limited 
his scope, should venture to treat." 

Annual membership fee. $3; life membership fee, 
8">U. The annual volumes arc sent free of cost to all 
members. Those taking life membership now can 
make very advantageous arrangements with the Sec- 
retary for securing the volumes of past publications. 
Address K. A. Brock, Secretary, State Capitol, Rich- 
mond, Va. 



Knoxvii.i.e, Texx.. April 3, 1893. — Friend Cunning- 
ham: For years I have sought in many ways to obtain 
the address of surviving members of the several corps 
of Whitworth's Sharpshooters of the Army of Ten- 
nessee. The first organization was that of Cleburne'B 
division, at Wartrace, in 1863; afterward a corps com- 
prising all of the Whitworth Rifles in Bragg's army 
was organized near Chattanooga, and did grand service 
thereafter till the end of the civil war. The third or- 
ganization was made at Meridian, in the army of ( ten, 
Johnston, afterward known as the Army of Missis- 
sippi, and, after the death of Gen. Polk, as Stewart's 
Corps of the Army of Tennessee. Can you help me? 
Yours truly, ('has. F. Vanderford. 

Any survivors of this organization will he glad to 
see the above from Maj. Vanderford. who organized 
them at all the places named, and who was confi- 
dential and intimate with Joseph E. Johnston. Pat- 
rons of the Veteran will prize what he may b< 
en, utgh to till them from time tot 

THESE WOND1 HI t I Gl MS. 
The Whitworth ritle was made in England, and was 
imported by the l Irdnance Bureau of the Confederate 
States at a cost of about 81,000, in the equivalent of 

gold, for each title and one thousand rounds of ammu- 
nition. A telescope, about ten inches long, fitted with 
of great power and exquisite finish, could tic 
instantly hinged upon the breech end of the barrel, 
the eye piece adjusted so as to !„■ at the proper dis- 
tance from the l, ft ,ye ,,f the rifleman. The front, or 
object glass end of the telescope, was furnished with 
an arc sliding easily, hut close, in a guide-piece fast- 
ened upon the barrel of the gun. The axis of the tel- 
escope ami that ,,f the rifle barrel were i xactly paral- 
lel in vertical line whatever the elevation of the muz- 
zle; the aim was always made by sighting through the 
glass. The cartridge was made with great care; the 
bullets of compressed lead, one and a half in, dies long, 
and of precisely uniform weight; the charges of pow- 
der precisely ,,f the same weight, the grains somewhat 
coarse, of uniform size, finely glazed; the cartridge 
wrapped in parchment and coated with paraffine. The 
men were drilled in camp, on the march, and even on 
the field of battle, in judging distances. They would 
he halted, for instance, and required to guess at the 
distance of a certain point ahead and then measure 
by steps on their way. When firing, these men 
were never in haste; the distance of a line of men. of 
.1 horse, an artillery ammunition chest, was carefully 
decided upon; the telescope adjusted along its arc to 
give the propel elevation: the gun rested against a 
tree, across a log, or in the fork of the rest-stick carried 
for the purpose The terrible effect of such weapons, 
in the hands of men who had heen selected, one only 
from each infantry brigade, because of his special 
merit as a soldier and skill as a marksman, can he 
imagined. They senl these bullets fatally 1200 yards, 
and were unpleasant a mile off. 

St. Louis Christian Advocate: "It abounds with inter- 
est iug facts and incidents concerning men and things 
in the late war ami after the war. Mention is made 
of prominent actors on both sides, hut always in a 
spirit of fraternity and good-will. It may, then, be 
read with interest and pleasure by people in all sec- 
tions of the country." 



nS 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. / 

REVIVED REMINISCENCES. "UNCLE" DAN EMMETT. AIT110R OF "DIXIE." 



\v. a. CAMPBELL, COLUMBCB, Mis-. 



Your article from the Fifteenth Texas soldier, and 
the Federal, in tin' March Dumber, reminds me of my 
own experience with an Ohio soldier, either of the 
Sixty-second <>r Sixty-third Ohio Regiment, July 22, 
1864, just at tin- edge of Decatur, Ga., about six miles 
from Atlanta. A- my command (Muldron's Missis- 
sippi Calvary went into Decatur 1 -aw a wounded 
Federal in tin- hot sun, and I halted and asked him 
it 1 could do anything for him. He said, " Yes, please 
give mi- water and get me out of tin- sun." I unslung 
my canteen and gave him half in his own canteen 
and carried him to the shade. 11'- thru pointed to 
one of our men and .-aid. "That man took my money 
and knife." I ordered tin- man to return them t>> him, 

which he did. and 1 -aid to the Federal that as soon as 

the battle was over I would have him carried to the 
tield hospital. After the fight was over I went hack 
to see about him. hut he had been taken away, and 1 
do not know anything more of him. lie was shot 
through the right lung, and may have died. My rec- 
ollection is that he belonged to Badge's corps, as we 
captured this general's headquarters, with books and 
papers. 

Capt. Campbell, who is the Adjutant of the [sham 
Harrison Camp at Columbus, sends this additional 
reminiscence : 

Mr. T. .1. McGahee, now a citizen of this place, re- 
lates the following incident as happening to him during 
tin/ war: He was wounded in the leg and captured and 
carried to the Federal hospital, and the surgeon in 
charge derided to amputate it. McGahee said to 
tin- doctor: "I do not want my leg cutoff, I would 
rather die." Hut tin- surgeon said: "I don't care 
what you want. I am going to cut it oil." So McGahee 
was put on the table and preparations made to cut. 
McGahee refused to take chloroform, and as the sur- 

feon came up to tin- table. McGahee, who uses his hit 
and, gathered all his strength and hit the surgeon a 
stinging blow- in the nose, bringing the blood and 
knocking him down. As soon as the surgeon could 
recover from tin- blow, with an oath he rushed at the 
man, cut him so badly with the surgeon's knife that 
he was afraid to operate, and so McGahee was carried 
back to the hospital, and he has his leg yet. He does 
not remember the surgeon's name, but no doubt if 
yet living he will remember this Incident well. 

Again he writes: A. .1. Story, of the Eleventh Ala- 
bama Regiment. Wilcox's Brigade, Mahone's Division, 
and now living here, captured a Capt. \V. W. Wads- 
worth, of Pumell's Legion, Maryland t roups, at t lie I >avis 
Farm battle, seven miles from Petersburg, Va., on the 
Weldon Railroad. He took his sword and pistol from 
him and has this sword now. If he knew that Capt. 
Wads worth was living, or any of his i in mediate family, 
he would return it gladly. The pistol he gave away 
in Virginia. The sword was given to ('apt. Wads worth 
by his friends of the Twelfth Ward in Baltimore, so the 
inscription on the hand of scabbard shows. Mr. Story 
says as he was going back with his prisoner he met 
Maj. Crow, of the Ninth Alabama Regiment, and 
turned him over to the Major, and Capt. Wadsworth 
handed the Major his watch ami purse to bake care of, 
as they were both Masons. 



Mount Vernon, Va., April 2. — "Uncle" Han Em- 

iintt. the composer of the celebrated and soul-stirring 
song, •' I bxie," is living here on the bounty of friends. 
The Actors' bund of New York has forwarded sums 
of money from time to time to supply his wants. 
Uncle Dan is seventy-eight years old, and since he be- 
gan as a boy of ten to work for a living his life has 
Been one long series of ups and downs, adventures 
and triumphs. And now. suffering from hardships 
and poverty, aged and forsaken, he is at work on a life 
of Daniel B te in poetry, which is almost com- 
pleted. He has received word to go to New York. 
that his friends may demonstrate their kind remem- 
brance of him at a benefit. Asked about the compo- 
sition of "Dixie," Mr. Emmett said: 

"In L859 I was connected with Bryant Brothers' 
Min.-trels. of New York. One Saturday night Jerry 
Bryant came to me and said: 'Uncle Han, can't you 
write me a hurrah walk-around, something to make a 
noise with, and bring it here for rehearsal Monday 
morning?' I told him I thought I could. He said. 
'Do so, and bring it.' 

"Going home. Sunday being a rainy day. I com- 
posed 'Dixie' for him. and he was SO delighted with it 
that he made us rehearse it all day Monday for the 
evening performance. It was a 'go' right from the 
start. When the war broke out Bryant Brothers' Min- 
strels were forbidden to sing it. It became so unpop- 
ular in the North that when the band played it in the 
streets of New York they were hooted and jeered at." 



While giving a sketch of Han Emmet, who wrote 
"Dixie" it seems fitting to say a word about "Yankee 
I )n, idle." The story I get is that for one hundred and 
thirty-live years it has been a historic air. Few, per- 
haps, remember that to an English wit and musical 
genius we are indebted lor the old tune. But true it 
is. although it was composed in a spirit of rivalry, 
awakened by the sight of the "Yankee Hoodies who 
came to town" in answer to Gen. Amherst's appeal to 
the colonies for aid. 

It was in the summer of 177") that the British army 
was encamped on the east bank of the Hudson, a little 
below Albany. They were to open a campaign against 
the French Canadians, and the well-disciplined and 
uniformed troops awaited the arrival of the volun- 
teers. In they came, a motley crowd — old men, mid- 
dle-aged men, and young men— but all with brave 
hearts beating and strong arms ready to do battle. 
Some were mounted on ponies, others on old farm 
horses, taken from the plow, and many, with zeal 

which knew no fatigue, hurried on foot. Each carried 
his own outfit and provisions. No two were dressed 
alike; there were long coats and short coats, and no 
coats at all ; there w ere high hats and low hats, covering 
closely-cropped heads or wigs with flowing curls. In 
they marched, and the regular soldiers made merry at 
their expense. Even the officers were not betterman- 
nered, and the Surgeon, Dr. Shackburg, entertained 
his friends at mess by playing "Yankee Doodle," 
which he had composed in derision of the volunteers. 
Twenty years later "Yankee Doodle" cheered the 
heroes of Bunker Hill; and later still, more than ever 
endeared to American hearts, it was exultantly played 
as Lord Cornwallis' army marched into Washington's 
camp at Yorktown. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



119 



BRIEF BRILLIANT CAREER OF GEN. HINDMAN. 



Gen. Thomas C. Hindman was born at Knoxville, 
Tenn., in 1830. His father, Thomas C. Hindman, 
moved to Mississippi when T..C. Hindman, Jr., was 
quite young. He and his brother Robert were in 
school at Princeton when the Mexican war broke out, 
and they left school to join the army. Their father, 
in the meantime, had become colonel of the Missis- 
sippi Regiment in that war. Young T. ('. Hindman, 
at the age of seventeen, was brevetted second lieu- 
tenant for gallantry. In 1856, having moved to 
Helena, Ark., he made the race for Congress against 
Dorsey Rice, and was elected as a state-' Rights Dem- 
ocrat, taking his seat in 1857. During this canvass 
he and Pat Cleburne, who was his room-mate and 
bosom friend, were attacked by John Rice, Dorsey 
Rice, and their brother-in-law, .lame- Marryatt, who 
shot them from concealment and dangerously wounded 
both of them. Hindman was wounded very badly in 
the left side, while Cleburne was shot entirely through 
In return .lames Marryatt was shot dead, and Dorsej 
Rice and John Rice ran away and left the city. In 
1861 Mr. Hindman resigned his seat in Congress to 
enter the Confederate army. Returning to Arkansas, 
he raised a legion known as " Hindman's Legion," of 
which he was elected colonel, lie was made brigadier- 
general at Bowling Green, Ky., in which Mite In- look 
part in some severe engagements. At the battle of 
Shiloh he led a division and was dangerously wounded 
in the fust day's fight, and hi- horse was shot while he 
was making a charge, lie was promoted to the rank 
of major-general lor his conduct at Shiloh. After re- 
covering from his Shiloh wounds he commanded the 
Trans-Mississippi District, and by his energy and ag- 
gressiveness organized and equipped quid' an army. 
He hail succeeded in almost clearing the department 
of Federal forces when he was ordered, at hi- own re- 
quest, to the eastern side of the river tor more active 
service. While in Arkansas he commanded the Con- 
federates in the bloody battle of Prairie Grove, where 
the Federals, though superior in numbers, were de- 
feated and demoralized under Gen, Blount. He com- 
manded a division at the battle of Chickamauga, ami 
was so badly wounded that for several months after 
wards he was unable to resume command. When tie 
war closed (ien. Hindman went to the City of Mexico, 
where he remained for about three years. Returning 
to Helena he took a very active part in the protei tion 
of his people from the carpet-bag element and wa- as 
sassinated by unknown parties September 28j 1868. 



IMPARTIAL UNITED STATES HISTORY. 



A committee appointed bj the United Confederate 
Veterans to consider the matter of procuring an im- 
part isan school history of the United States, in which 
justice should he done to the South, with special refer- 
ence to its part in the war between the States, met in 
New Oilcans. It consisted of the late Gen. E. Kirhy- 
Smith, Prof. Nicholson, of the University of Tennes- 
see. Prof. Alonzo Hill and lien. ]>. S. Lee, of Mis-is 
sippi. Gen. Smith expressed it as his opinion that 
the hest way to get the materials for the history out- 
side of the records in the War Department, which, of 
course, were invaluable, would he to have the camps 
of the Confederate Veterans throughout the entire 
South take the trouble to collect all material in the 



way of documents, personal recollections, etc.. within 
their reach. The camps in this way could collect all 
that was necessary to supplement the Government 
records. After some discussion of the question of se- 
lecting a southern author of scholarship and reputa- 
tion to prepare such a history, it was decided inexpe- 
dient at tin- time to take such action, and the follow- 
ing resolution was adopted : 

1. "The committee is gratified to report that several 
histories of the United States, suitable for use in 
schools and acadamies, have been written in the past 
t'' \\ years which, though partisan, deal fairly with all 
questions touching the South and the war between the 
Slates. Thi- evidence that the best thought of south- 
ern as well a- northern writers is now directed to this 
matter, encourages the hope that the long and sorely 
fell want of a correct history for our children w ill soon 
be, if it is not already, supplied. 

■_'. "That the committee assign to its several mem- 
bers certain of these histories, and also such a- are 
deemed unfair, and that each member he required to 
submit a written report on such histories as may he 
assigned to him at the next meetingof the committee 

The committee then adjourned to meet at Birming- 
ham, Ala.. July 17. 1893, when the members will sub- 
mit their reports. 



CONFEDERATE GENERAL 



A 



A. M. Sea. Jr.. of Louisville, Ky.. sends the follow- 
ing carefully prepared list. Correction of any errors 
i- requested : 



Samuel Cooper, N.Y.. Jum n, Va., Dec. 3. ls7n. 

A Hi.' it S. Johnston.... Ky., Feb. 2, 1803 Shllob, Tenn., April K, 1882, 
Robert I Lei Va., [-an 19, 18U7 Lexington, Va., Oct. 12, 1870. 

Joseph E. Johnston Va , Feb.8, 1MJ7 Washington, Ire. March 

21, It 
G.T.R La., May 28, 1818 New Orleans, La., Feb. 20, 

1883. 
Braxton Bragg N.C., March 27, UUT.Galveston, Texas, Sept. -'7, 

1876. 

E. Klrby-Smlth Fla., May 16, 1824 Sewanee, Tenn., March js, 

1893. 

i.l Mi; \i . Il MPOH Ull 1! INK. 

Ky., June 1, 1831 Ne* Orleans, La., i.u 



John H. Hood 



Lieutenant Generals. 



James Longstreel S. < '.. Jan. s. isia 

1 nidae Polk N.C., April 10, ism) Pine M««ntain,Tenn., June 

14, 1864. 
Theoph. H. Holmes. N. C, 1804 Fayetteville, N. C, June 20, 

1880. 

William J. Hardee Ga., 1817 Hydesvllle, Va., Nov. 6, 1873. 

Thomas J. Jackson Va., Jan. 21, ls_'i Guinea's Station, Va.. May 

Hi. 186 I. 

John i Pemberton Pa., Aup. 10, 1814 Penllj n. Pa,, July 13, 1881. 

Richard S. Ewel) D.C., Feb.B, 1817 Springfield, Tenn., Jan. 25. 

1872. 

Ambrose P. Hill Va., Nov. 9, I82S Petersburg.Va., April 2, 1865 

lianlel H. Hill s.c.iuh 12, 1821 Charlotte, N. C. Sept. 25, 

1889. 
Richard Taylor La., Jan. 27, 1827..... New York City, April 12. 

1878. 

Stephen D. Lee s. C 

Jul. :il A. Early Va.. Nut., 2, lsltl 

Richard H. Anderson s. c. isiii lleaufort, s. ('., Jnne2n, 1«79. 

Alex. P. Stewart Tenn., Oct 2, 1821 

Nathan B. Forrest Tenn.. July 13,1821. ..Memphis, Tenn., Oct. 29, 

IS77. 

Wade Hamilton s. i !., March 28, 1818. 

Simon B. Buckner Ky.. April 1, 1823 

Jo-pii Wheeler....^ Ga., sept. io. 1888 

John IS. Gordon Oa.. Feb. 6, 1836 



Capt. B. M. Teague, Aiken, S. C: "My friends who 
read the Confederate Veteran are delighted with it." 
Capt. Teague, who preserves war relies, is anxious for 
"the Confederate paper printed by Grant's men after 
the fall of Vicksburg." 



120 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 




TRIBUTE TO GEN. BEAUREGARD. 



The Old Guard 



The I!. E. Lee Camp a1 Richmond got off its dignity 
in this year '93 so far as to publish the following: 

"MEAN-YOU" 
FOB \ "BIG BAT" IN MEMORY OF OLD T1MBS. 

First Belief.—* lyster Soup, shadow Soup, Invisible soup. Horse- 
tail Soup. Old Suck soup, and more Soup ; Job's Turkey, stuffed with 
sauerkraut ; Roast Pigs, stolen by Pegram's Battalion and kindly con- 
tributed; Nassau Bacon, sliced ; Baked Duck, Wagon Grease Sauoe ; 
Baked Mule, Baked Beans, Castor Oil Beans, a la Bedford. 

Second Relief.— Bull Hun Stew, Jfevll-of-a-stew, Ferriter's Irish 
Stew, Stewed Boot Jacks, The Mozarl Academy stew, Greyback stew. 
With "Let-gO" Sauce, stew All Around, Another stew- when we gel 
home; Pumpkins Pun, pUin-heads, onions. Red Beets, Dead Beats, 

Corn tolis Appomattox stylo. Green Apples. Gi n rersiminous, 

Black Eye Peas, seasoned with old Quids. 

Third Relief.— Sorghum Pies, shortened with Plaster of Paris; 
Crab Apple Pie, with Pine Tar Sauce ; Doughnuts, fried in Castor Oil ; 
A.dam'8 Apple, Pears (male and female. Onions sliced in Vinegar 

(Copied from Westmoreland Club), Acorns, Hard Nuts iTom Byrne 
and Geo. Dean), Pish Balls, Minnie Halls, ami Base Balls. 

Cold Dishes.- ice, with noCre ; Home-made Ice, Northern Ice, 

Mill-pond Ice, .More lee ; lee Sykels. new kill to .lulillsi. 

Luxuries.- Pepper Sauce, Slops, Polk-berry Bon nee, Grand Bounce, 
Bounced Out, Rye Coffee, .Muddy Water, Cold Water, Irish Whiskey 
and More Whiskey, Shampain, Pain-ln-belly, Smoke. 

Attached to the liill of fare was this "notice": 

»«r The committee ha- specially ruled that no comrade shall conic 
to the tal.le in his hare feet, or without a shirt on i no matter about its 
being hoi led), nor shall he put his feet on the table, nor pick his teeth 
with a bayonet. 

The Katerer la German Prince in disguise) is skilled In his art, was 
chief cook for Kornwallis, and will, no doubt, give immense satisfac- 
tion in thus getting rid of his stale rarions— relics of the late wah. N. 
P. Banks having retired from the service, the commissary stores are 
rather limited. 



Gen. W. I.. Cabell, in public meeting at Dallas: 

I knew Gen. Beauregard as long and more inti- 
mately than any of his old army friends now living, 
' xcept, probably, Gen. Jubal Early. I knew him be- 
fore the war. and. was his chief quartermaster ami con- 
fidential stall' oliicer at Manassas from June 1, 1861, 
until after the battles of Blackburn's Ford ami Bull 
Kim, on the 18th ami 21s< of -Inly, when Gen. Joseph 
E. Johnston, by virtue of his rank, assumed com- 
ma ml. I. of course, was after that mi (o -ii. • I oh ii-t on '- 
staff. All this, however, is matter of history. 1 want 
to indorse every word found in these resolutions, and 
to reiterate, if possible, the sentiment that he was one 
of the greatest of civilization's soldiers and chieftains. 
lie was a man of matchless ability as a great field 

commander, ami known to he and pn unced one of 

the greatest military engineers living. His attack on 
Foil Sumler and his defense of Charleston won for 
him the admiration not only of the South, but of the 
European nations, lie was not only a great leader, 
luit he was a great Organizer, and had the love and 
confidence of the Southern soldiers, no matter from 
what part of the South the soldiers came. The men- 
tion of his name i Beauregard i on the halt lefield would 
inspire as much enthusiasm as "Napoleon" ever did 
in the zenith of his glory. 1 was by his side at Black- 
burn's Ford and Hull Run unless off executinghisorders. 
He was a perfect .Murat in a charge, he was cool under 
tire, and his presence everywhere created a shout that 
made even a soldier quicken his pace in the charge, 

1 was not only with him in Virginia, hut was with 
him at Corinth after the battle of Shiloh. and had the 
honor of his presence on two or three occasions at 
Corinth when 1 " skirmished " with the enemy. After 
the fight at Farmington he came up with Gen. Van 
Horn and simply said: "Cabell, I am proud of you 
and your Texans." He could have said nothing that 
would have given me more pleasure, and I know what 
was gaid was fully appreciated by the brave men I 
commanded. 

Gen. Beauregard's manner to his soldiers during the 
war was such as to win their love and admiration. 
1 1 is career since the war has shown him to he a " mod- 
est citizen of tender traits and sensitive honor," of 
generous and noble impulses always ready and willing 
to assist with his purse or to encourage with his ex- 
ample and advice the people of the South, whom he 
loved better than his life. Whether on the tented 
field or in the councils of State, Gen. Beauregard was 
always the same brave and true patriot. 1 not only 
admired him as a great soldier, hut loved him as a 
brother, and his name and his fame will he cherished 
by mi' and mine as long as we are permitted to remain 
on tdiis side of the great river that we all have to cross. 



Tiik Davis Monument. — The proposed monument 
to Jefferson Davis is a monument to Southern valor. 
sacrifice, and devotion to principles. It is a testimo- 
nial to those who will come after US that the people of 

this generation are not unappreciative of the indom- 
itable courage ami heroism of the soldiery of the 
South. It is the patriotic duty of every man and 
woman in the Southern States who has a penny to 
spare to give it to this cause, and the Sunny South will 
be pleased to receive and forward subscriptions. — Tile 
Sunny Smith. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



121 



BUILD THE DAVIS MOUMENT. 



THE SOUTHERN PEOPLE TO UNITE IN THE WORTHY UN- 
DERTAKING. 



The committee appointed by Gen. J. B. Gordon, 
of Georgia, Commander of the United Confederate 
Veterans, of one from each State, met in Richmond, 
Sept. 17, by direction ot its chairman, Gen. W. L. 
Cabell, of Texas, to consider the Location, cost of con 
struction, plans, etc., for the Davis Memorial. The 
Richmond Association participated in the proceedings. 

The general purposes wire set forth by the chairman 
in a series of resolutions. They were that "as Rich- 
mond was the capital of the Confederacy, and has been 
selected by Mrs. Jefferson Davis as the burial place of 
her husband, it is regarded the most appropriate place 
for the erection of a monument to his memory. The 
United Confederate Veterans will co-operate with the 
Davis Monument Association of Richmond and the. 
Southern Press Association in its efforts to erect the 
same." Also thai State organizations be formed, and 
" that the chairman appoint for each Southern State 
and for the Indian and Oklahoma Territories a sub- 
committee of five members, each of which shall have 
within its territory the entire control and supervision 
of all matters pertaining to this sacred object, includ- 
ing the collection of funds by popular subscription, 
and shall have authority t'o name a suitable and re- 
sponsible person as treasurer, to receive the same ami 
forward quarterly to the treasurer of the Richmond 
Associat ion." 

Gen. Cabell bus made the following appointments, 
selecting from Veteran Associations: 

Virginia— Gen Thomaa A Brander, Chairman; Hon J Taylor Elly- 
Bon. Col Peyton Wise, Hon George L Christian, Rlcumoud; >r> w i 
sin h< plin, b:in\ Ule. 

Tennessee— S A Cunningham, Chairman, N nl C W Frs- 

ser, Memphis; (Jen .1 V Shipp, Chattanooga; Gen Prank A Moses, 
Knoxvllle. 

Indian Trkri rem Gen N P Guy, Chairman, McAlester: Gen John 
L Gait, Hon It W Carter, Ardmore; Col R B Coleman, McAli sti i Gi 
D M Haley, Krebs. 

Arkansas lira Kin T Ihival. Chairman, Fori Smith; Senator Jas 
Berry, Bentonvilie; Col Jordan E Cravens, Clarksvllle; Maj A S Cab- 
ell. Fori smith; Gen Anderson Gordo'h, Morrillton. 

Kentucky— Gen John Boyd. Chairman, Lexington; Gen Bazil 
Duke, Louisville; Hon W C r Breckinridge, Lexington; Gen W I 
ivrr\ . Bowling Gre**n; Ex-Gov s B Buckner, Louisa Hie 

Georgia— Gen I'M B Young, Chaircnun, Cartersvi He; Gen W L Cal- 
houn, Atlanta; Capl \ P Roberts, Dalton ; In. I iVilllam Jones, Gen 
Clemant A Evans, Atlanta. 

Alabama Gen J i Holtzclaw, Chairman, Montgomery : Qen V s 
Ferguson, Birmingham ; Caul George H Cole, I utaw; Gen Joseph 
Wheeler, Wheeler; Joseph e Johnston, Birmingham. 

Florida Gen J -I Dlcklson, Chairman, ucala; Col Fred L Robert- 
Bon, BrookHVllle; Gov F P Fleming Jacksonville; Gen George Rei 8< 
Pensacola: Gen s c French, Grlanao. 

South Carolina— Gen Ellison Capers. Chairman, (ion Wade 
Hampton, Columbia; Gen John Bratton, winnsboro; Gen Stanleys 
Crittenden, Greenville; Capl nil Teague, Aiken. 

North Carolina — Gen E D Hall, Chairman, Wilmington; Gen R 
F Hokp. Raleigh; Hon Rutus Barnnger, Charlotte; Hon Matl W Ran- 
soin. i Iraj Bburg; M O Sherrill, Newton. 

Mississippi Gen Stephen D Lee, Chairman, StarkviUe; <">\ .1 M 
si, ,ui. Ex-Gov Robert Lowery, Jackson; Col C C Flowerree, Vicks- 
burg; Lieut Fred .1 V LeCand, Natchez. 

Division of the Northwest— Gen .T C Underwood, Chairman, * ■ •' 
Bamuel Baker, Maj F H Soutbmayd, Maj Jere S White, Col R Lee 
France, Chicago, 

Louisiana — Gen John Glynn, Chairman; Gen .T A Chalaron, <ien 
L Jastremski, Brig Gen Charles A Harris, Col W R Lyman, New Or- 
leans. 

Missouri— Gen Charles C Rainwater, Chairman, Si Louis; Capt Jos 
W Mercer, Kansas CltJ . Capt Henry Guiber, Col Darwin Marma- 
duke. I'olW I' Harlow, si Louis. 

Maryland— Gen George H Stewart, Chairman, Baltimore. Gen 
Stewart to appoint tour associates, 

Oklahoma Territory— Gen Samuel T Leavy, chairman, Norman. 
Gen Leavy to appoint four associates. 

There lias been lack of active co-operation on the 
part of some of the foregoing committees. Gen. W. 
H. Jackson, Chairman for Tennessee, being unable to 
serve, S. A. Cunningham was put in his place. Gen. 
John Boyd, the Kentucky Chairman, although full of 
zeal, lias been unable to serve. The same is true of 



(ien. Rainwater, of Missouri, and Gen. Capers, of South 
Carolina. 

(reus. Diekison.of Florida. Hall, of North Carolina, 
and Lee, of Mississippi, have been zealous from the 
start, and will doubtless make good showings in their 
report. Texas is not in the above list, but the "Lone 
Star" is snre to shine brightly in the exhibit. 

LIST OF THose WHO HAVE CONTRIBUTED. 

This list of contributors to the Davis Monument 
d.M- not comprise all the collections, but all money 
sent through S. A. Cunningham as General Agent, 
and since, is included, unless by some error. If inac- 
curate request is made for information. 

\l Al'.AM A 

Anniston — Through Mrs. I!. Gardner, $21. 
Birmingham — .1 I. Buford; through Mrs I! M Gard- 
ner, two bundled dollars. 

EuTAVl Sander-' Camp, six dollars. 

( i vdsden .! Aiken. \V < ■ Brockway and A L Glenn, 
$5; W'm Chandler, A .1 Collingsworth. L W Dean, A 
B Dunny, VV A Dungan, WHDenson, 15; 11 < i Earnest, 
Frank & Haysdon, M I. Hicks. L E Humphreys, Meek 
& Johnson, $5; .1 H Standifer, Abe Thompson, J E 
Whaley, I! A Mitchell, R Goldman and L Smith, 
of Queen city Lank, $5, through Mi- I! Gardner. 

Greenville — Laura E A.brams, I K Adam-, . I T 
Beeland, J G Daniel & Co, D G Dunklin, W J Dunk- 
lin. Dunn & Ezekiel, C B Herbert. I. M Lane. Robl 
A Lee. .1 a McGehee, I has Newman, Chas Newman. 
T W Peagler, ffm Pierce, Mrs W Pierce, Mrs R V Por- 
ter, .1 I; Porterfield, .1 B Powell, .1 C Ri< hardson, F C 
Smith. .1 (' Steiner, -1 M Steiner, S •' Steiner, A Stein- 
hart. A G Stewart, T J Thomas, Rev G R Upton, .1 II 
Wilson, Mrs F S Y Wilson, through Mrs |; .) Porter. 

Huntsville— Miss Jean ie Sheflfej . 

Mobile- -I R Burgett, \V W Dugger, Van Lorn sta- 
tion; W ( i Duggar, Gallion station: Mi-- M 1'. Kirk- 
bride, T T Roche, Louise B Sprague, -I I! Tompkins, 
J L Tucker, Price Williams. Jr, through Mis- Louise 
B Sprague. 

Montgomery — Mrs M 1> Bibb, Miss Jennie 1! Crom- 
melin; through Mrs M D Bibb, $1 13 85 

Pratt Mines— D M B Hasslet, J T Massingen, T E 
Mitchell. .1 C Moore. W N Polk, J W Randall, L M 
Reese, J A Rhode3, P J Rogers, $2; W 1. Rogers, C A 
Simmons. F A Smith, Walton A- Peteel, F F Wiggins, 

Tuscumbia— Through Col. A. II. Kellar, $13.15. 

Union Springs — 1> S Bethune, Virginia A Black- 
mon, X M Blidsoe, 11 G Bryan, Annie F Buford, J R 
Buford, H P Coleman, Mrs S J Foster.CC Frazer, Mrs 
N H Frazer. W H Fuller, E H Goodwin, 1! 11 Hajas, 
Annie L Hobdy, Jennie McKay Hobdy, J B Hobdy, 
Main Hobdy, Mary Hobdy, R L Hobdy, R L Hobdy, 
Jr.. Chas L. links, A Mile-'. Mrs p M Moseley, Mrs A 
B Phillips, Mrs .1 E Pickett, W W Rainer, f P Han- 
dle. F T Handle. .1 L Roberts, through Mr J L and 
Miss Annie E Buford. 

ARKANSAS. 

Arkadelphia— J H Abraham, H T Cook, D T Halt. 
T M Ewing, .1 A Ross, CC Sett, John Smoker. $2.50 
each; Geo Fuller, $5; C K Boswell, F .1 Carpenter, . I 
W Conger, Adam Clark, J H Crawford, E L Jones, C 
V Murray, E H McDonald, F C McDonald, Ed Thomas,. 
A W Wi'lson, J W Wilson. 



122 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



Augusta — James Eblin. 

Batesvili.e — Nathan Adler, Simon Adler, James 
A Luster, John F Allen, W E Bevens, J WCase,Jas A 

Carter, .1 P Collin, R-M Desha, W .1 Erwin, D C 
Ewing, John W Ferrill, J C Fitzhugh, K L Givens, S 
A Hail. II M Hodge, T .1 Horn,-. W B Lawrence, T M 
Mark, Robt Neill, '1' .1 Owens, I X Reed, James Ruth- 
erford, M A Wycough, M A R Wycough, by James 
Rutherford. 

El Dorado — W R Appleton. 

Hope — Mrs C A Forney 

Hot Springs — Dr Thomas E Holland, five dollars. 

Little Ro< k — Through Hon John GFleteher, $11.25. 

Moorefield — Jesse A Moore, J E Ross. 

Morrillton — West Humphreys. 
FLORIDA. 

Jacksonville — Gen Wm Bayaand \\* 1) Matthews,' 
$500. 

Sandford — C 11 Adkins, R S Dickens, Capt O S 
Traver, Col A M Thrasher. 

Sanirel Island — Mrs Letitia A Nutt, Miss Nannie 
Nutt, five dollars. 

GEORGIA. 

Amerk is— C B Hudson, 82; W E Murphy. 

Atlanta — E- L Anthony, Geo T Beeland, Charles 
Beermann & Co, 815; J L "Bishop, F C Bitgood, B M 
Blackburn, W H Black, 82; L R Blecklv, 85: N S 
Blum, 82; S D Bradwill, $2; J D Brady, 82; Robert 
Brazelton, G S Brewster, $2 ; EC Brown, S E Brown, 
TJ Burney, David J Bush, 82; Milton A Candler, S 
N Chapman, J H Clifton, Philip Cook, 85; H H Cobb, 
A E Cox, C J Daniel, H R Daman, M K Dennis, J A 
Foote, L B Folsom. W E Fonti, Harry Frank, 82; 
Arnold Gedman, M B Gilmox, W C Glenn', 85; Peter 
G Grant, H H Green, 82: D R G rover. R G Guinn, J 
L Harrison, Rev W M Hayes, 82; W M Hawkes, R II 
High tower, .las K Hines, 85; Jerry Holmos, Joseph . 
Jacobs, 82 ; II Jennings, .Mark W Johnson, J C Joiner, 
Geo H Jones, $2; J wm Jones, $50; -las I. Key, 82; 
Dr J J Knott, $2; Lamar & Rankin, $5; S H Landrum, 
Thos J Leftwick, 85; Walter T McArthur, 82; D E 
McCarty, Hy McCaw, B L Mcintosh, 82; C K Mad- 
dox, 85"; I H Martin, 82; II A Matthews, V A Menard, 
C W Morgain, F II Moses, A J Moss, J W Nelms, 82; 
R T Nesbitt, 85; W M Newbern, 82; Newton, Baker 
& Co, H I, Nippert, $2 ; Robert A Nisbett, 82 ; John O 
Perry, 82; Wm H II Phelps, 82; J B Pickett. P 
Roman, 85; Lavender Ray, $2 ; K Reed, H N Ried, 
82; Sidney Root, 810; W' E Seabrook, Geo W Scott, 
825; W L Seddon. 85; John W Shackelford. A G 
Smart, 82; Burgess Smith, John Clay Smith, 82; Hoke 
Smith, 85(1; W J Speairs, J C Steerman, $2; R E 
Stockton, 82: J D Stokes, Jos Thompson, $5; B Vig- 
noux, 82; C Z Wei n master, 82; W A Wright, 82; A 
R Wright, 82; Wm A Wright, 85, through Mrs I! 
Gardner. 

Augusta — Patrick Walsh and others, $400.91 ; Wm 
H Fleming. 

Arlington— H C Heffield, $2.50. 
Blacksheaf. — A P Brantley, Nettie Brantley, Henry 
J Smith, Jennie Smith, by Miss Smith. 
Blitch — James Young. 
Carrollton — J M Hewitt, two dollars. 
Cedartown — J H Sanders, two dollars. 



Chickamauga — S F Parrott. 

Crawford — I G Gibson, two dollar-. 

Danville— T I. Hill, s W Sapp. 

Dublin — T L Griner, John M Stubbs. 

Georgetown — John C Guilford. 

Glennville — J P Collins, five dollars. 

Handy— W I. Crowder. 

Macon— J Hell. Mrs A s Cope. J W Hinton, $2 
each: Jas M Sapp, ('has Herbst; Bibb County Associ- 
ation, $163.09. 

MlLLEDGEVLLLE — J C Woodward. 

Moiier — B F Hoodspette. 

Montezuma — E chambers. 

PALATKA — Capt S II (hay. 

SMITHBORO — James Thomas Smith. 

Sonoraville — P T Ree.se. 

Sparta— Through Mrs. Middlebrooks, $41.75. 

Sylvania — E W Frey. 

Temple — Robert H Faber. 

Van's Valley — Alex White. 

Walkersville — J W Johnson. 

ILLINOIS. 

Chicago — Col G Forrester, Gen W A C Ryan. Mrs 
Ryan, Col J G Ryan, Mrs E A Shannon, James Fen- 
tress. 

Lilly — E W Bacon, Miss Lilly Bacon. 

Mackinaw— Mrs L E Brock. 

INDIANA. 
Evansville— Dr A J Thomas, $5. 
Indianapolis — G F Miller, 85 . 

INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Choteau— J H'Bnugh, M G Butler, W A Cantrell, 

V Cray, 82; C Hayden, A G Mc Daniel. 
PryoB Cheer — Tom A Hancock. 
Sherman — M L Elzy. 

KENTUCKY. 

Chilesburg — Richard A Spurr. 

Fairview— Bethel Sunday School, 88.50; R W Dow, 
ner, $3; P E Downer, $2.50; S B Jesup, B D Lackey- 
H E Morton,; J L Moselv, R L Moscly, 81.50 each; 
W R Vaughn. 

Frankfort — W T Havens. 

Georgetown — A H Sinclair, five dollars. 

Henderson — R II Cunningham, W M Hanna, M 
M Kimmel, J W Loekett, Sights A: Johnston, Mont- 
gomery Merritt, I) J B Reeve, J J Reeve, P K Snead, 
F Walker. 

Hopkinsville — W B Dicken. 

Lexington — Mrs S B Anderson, R T Anderson, C S 
Bell, Sr., W S Bell, Mrs Robert Berry, John Boyd, 
Hart Brown, J C Bryant, R S Bullock, Mrs John H 
Carter. John II Carter, C C Calhoun, W II Cassell, Mrs 
W II Cassell. A 1! Chinn, James B Clay, Horace Cole- 
man, Cicero Coleman, A A DeLong, C A DeLong, M 
J Durham, Jerry Delph, Edward Frazer, Graves & Cox, 
.1 M Graves, Ed Grass, Mrs A M Harrison, Mrs Laura 

V Hawkins, Miss Lillian Headley, James A Headley, 
John T Hughes, Joseph D Hunt, D H James, Moses 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



123 



Kaufman, Theo Lewis, J L Logan, Joel C Lyle, J R 
Morton, T W Moore, Thomas W McCann, H B McClel- 
lan, Byron McClelland, Howard McCorkle, J II Nelms, 
Bush Nelson, Watts Parker, .1 T Patterson, Wellington 
Payne, John 8 Phelps, Wickliffe Preston, II (' Price, 
Edward Price, Mrs L C Price, L C Price. .1 W Pryor, 
William Rodes, J C Rogers, J Woodson Royster. S P 
Salter, S <; Sharp, J H Shropshire, Mrs .1 II Shrop- 
shire, .1 Soule Smith, Richard Squires, Michael Sulli- 
van. J T Thome, R A Thornton, (Jpington & Pro., J 
T Vance, Willa Viley, Mat Walton, John II Wiehl, 
Jesse Woodruff; a Friend, J R Jewell, gave two dol- 
lars each; Miss Nannie Smith and Solomon VanMeter, 
live dollars each. 

Of the foregoing, seventy-five dollars was collected 
by Mrs. R. A. Spurr, and remitted to the Treasurer at 
Richmond; and fourteen dollars, collected by Mrs. 0. 
L. Bradley, remitted to the General Agent at Nashville. 

Louisville — Miss Martha A. Sneed, $10; Miss Jo- 
sephine Walker. 

Pembroke— R T Chilton, Mrs. R T Chilton. 

RrssKi.i.viLLE— T .1 Bailey, $6.05; -1 B Briggs, John 
W Caldwell, $5 each; Dr R N Beauchamp, George R 
Beall, Wilson Beard. R B Chastain, Joseph Cumbett, 
Dr B F Kidd, W B Met 'arty. James M McCutchen, 
John G. Orndorff, William Smith. ('. W. Swanson, M 
B Stovall. 

LOUISIANA. 

Mansfield— J W Adams, c W Blair, $5; T.l Book- 
er, F M Brown field, C T Baunnman, Henry Hums, 
John S Bailey, James Brown, Dr B D Cooper, I>r W 
N Cunningham, Cash, .las Dilzell, DeSoto Democrat, 
$0; .1 B Dillon, .1 Douglas, W .1 Flam. C W Flam. W 
F Fraser, S B Foster, F N Foster, Dr .1 W Fair, Win 
Gos8, S5; H D Gibbons, John Glossill, S A Guy, R T 
Gibbs.LH Hanson, W PHall.WT I laden.. 1 E Hewett, 
John Huson, W B Hewitt. A M Hewitt, B F Jenkins, 
$5; W T Jackson, J B Lee, .1 T McClanahan, W H 
Mason, W E May, R R Murphy, W I. Minter, E A 
Nal.ors, .1 M Nabors. E R Nabore, W T Pegins, E B 
Pickels, J W Parsons, A V Roach. (' W Page, B B 
Powell, (J Rives, Sallie Raseoe, E B Rogers, .1 H Ras- 
coe, Q Roberts, P II Ricks, Dr A V Roberts, $2.50; J 
Reiley, Albert Rives, M Ricks,Jas A Rives, . I C Rives, 
Capt'W P Sample, $5; Dr S .1 Smart, C 3 Smoote, W 
E Singleton, DrStoakes, Dr W Sutherland, II PSam- 
ple, E W Sutherland, G II Sutherland, Miss Belle 
Taylor, Sam Williams. W N Williams. B Wilier, B N 
Wimple. T J Williams, .1 B Williams. Chas P Will- 
iams. J B Williams. Jr.. Dr J F Walker, V Wemple, 
J Wemple, L B Wilcox, J L Williams, G B Will- 
iams. Miss Belle Taylor. 



Report from Col A W Hyatt, Treasurer for 
ana, to Col W R Lyman, A A G, New Orleans 
1801. 

dune 22, John T. Block, La. Div. A. N. V $ 

June 22, Wm. McLaughlin, Vet. C.S.C 

July 1, .1. Y. Gilmore, La. Div. A. N. V 

July 1, J. B. I. evert, Sugar and Rice Fx 

July 1, J. B. Levert, Vet. C. S. c 

July 1, Jos Demoruelle, C. H. St. Paul 

July 8, Lawson L. Davis, C. H. St. Paul 

July!), Col. Wm. P. Johnston, Soldiers and 

Sons of Soldiers of Avery's Salt Mines 

July 10, Gen. Ceo. 0. Watts, Jefferson Davis 

Camp 



Louisi- 



102 65 

54 00 

55 00 
100 :.ii 

•It 1 50 

22 ih) 

4:; 00 

11 25 

25 00 



64 00 
66 00 

102 50 

75 00 
60 mi 

8 50. 

9 05 
Hi 00 
36 :.ii 

150 10 

72 00 

|o 00 
221 50 



75 15 



July 10, Gen. Geo. 0. Watts. Citizens and 

Soldiers of Blue and Gray 

July 16, Pilcher Bros, and W. H. Pilcher, 

proceeds of Pilcher concert, July 10 

July 17. Chas. I). Delerey, Army of Tenn. La. 

Div. fund created 

July 22, A. W. Hyatt, A. of T. La. Div 

July 22, J. B. Levert. Vet. C. S. C 

July 22, J. B. Levert, Sugar and Rice Ex 

July 22, A. N. Block. La. Div. A. N. Va 

July 22, Lawson L. Davis, C. H. St. P 

July 22, Jos. Demoruelle, C. 11. St. P 

July 22, B. F. Eschelman, C. Wa. Art 

July 22, Alden McClellan, La. Div. Army of 

Tenn 

Aug. 17. ()<tave Fontenot, La. Div. Army of 

Tenn. at Opelousas 

Sept. 10, Paul Conrad, C. H.St. Paul.... 

Oct. 27. Oliver Normand. R. L. Gibson Camp 

and Ladies of Evergreen 

1892. 
Jan. 8, Judge F. A. Monroe, members Bar, 

Bench and Officers C. D. Courts 

Jan. 15, R. McMillan, C. Wash. Art 

Feb. 10, John T Block, Army of N. Va. La. 

Div.. collected by J. M. Wilson 

April 13, J. Lyons, citizens of New Orleans... 
Oct 11. Nicholson & Co., sundry collections 

of N. 0. Picayune.. 

Oct. 11. Nicholson & Co.. subscription of the 

N. 0. Picayune 

Nov. IS, J. W. Fairfax, sundry collections of 

Daily City Item 

Less disbursements to date as per vouchers 

on file 



$2,068 70 

Oct. 10, remitted to J. S. Ellett. 

treasurer, Richmond, Va $2,018 20 

Nov. 22, remitted to J. S. Ell< tt, 

treasurer, Richmond. Va 50 50— 2,068 70 

New Orleans — Mrs. May Poitevant, $5. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Fayette — James Archer, F Braws, Thos Davenport, 
W L Faulk. II McGladery, T J Key, W W McAa, A 
K McNair, W K Penny. W L Stephen, 3 3 Whitney. 

Holly Springs — Jas T Fant. 

( ). i:w Springs Mrs A A Staples. 

Roc kney — Geo Hickler. 

Vicksburg— The Vicksburg C. V. Camp, through 
Col. D. A. Campbell, $409.55. 

MISSOURI. 

Harrisonville — Jeff Burford, seventy-five dollars. 
H R Estes, $250. 

NEW JERSEY. 

Hoboken — James Coltart, 8">: Miss Virginia M Col- 
tart, Harriet Monk, John Stansfield. 



310 00 
47 50 


22 00 
33 <hi 


78 50 


loo 00 


.-,0 50 


17 7- r . 



Silver City 



NEW MEXICO. 
' A Thompson. 



NORTH CAROLINA. 

AsHEVlLLE — Mrs E J Aston, Mrs H A Gudger, Mrs 
J A Hucler, $2 each; Mrs I) Johnston, Mrs Theo D 



124 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



Johnston, Mrs B M Lee, C II Miller, Mrs M Penland, 
Miss Mary Penland, Mrs E 1. Rankin, R R Rawls, 
Henry Redwood, Miss Maggie Smith, Miss Anna Smith, 
Miss Louise Smith. Bessie Smith, Mann Smith. 

i n irlotte — Through the Observer, $29.50. 

.1 \. kson— Emma W Burgwyn, J A Burgwyn, Geo 1' 
Burgwyn, .1 B McRae, II B Peebles. 

Salisbi ky— Smt to Judge W L Calhoun, $15.25. 

Si ^tesville— Through J. P. Caldwell, four dollars 

Waynesville— William Boggs, 1! II Dykers, G S 
Ferguson, J "E Hall. Frank Hall. A .1 Reeves, Dr J II 

Way. 

sol Til CAROLINA. 

Camden— H G Carrison, I (' Clyburn, J G Hay, A 
It Kennedy, P T Nuepigue, W M Shannon, Springs, 
Heath & Co, J B Steedman, $5 each: Chronicle,] M 
Lemp, $3 each; B B Clarke, A A Moore, $2 each; GS 
Higgins, Cash. 

The above were collections by Dr. John W. ( lorbett, 
and sent to the Charleston Newsand Courier. He re- 
ports about $1 in raised at a concert given by the ladies 
and sent to the News and Courier. 
TENNESSEE. 

Adams Station — M I. Johnston. 

Alamo— W H Biggs, -I B Fleming, C A Goodbar, 
J B Humphreys, $2; P B Nance. W II Poindexter, T 
N Skelton, J D Wortham. 

Bells Station — Wm B Bate, ('apt. Dawson, 1! S 
McLe iv. .1 c W Nunn, -I II Thomas, D II Thomas. 

Bolivab -P W Austin. W T Anderson, C H Ander- 
son Ophelia P Bills, I- M ( larrington, W C Dorion, D 
K Durrett, R E Durrett, W W Farley. J L Foote, C S 
Ganden, II P Joyner, Kahn Bros.. Austin Miller. T E 
Moore, A T.McNeal, .1 -I NTeely, Jr., M N Perry, .1 C 
j.-. II W Tate, Julia M Upshaw, Hugh Williams, 
II II Wood. By oversight the amounts were m>t put 
to the Bolivar List that exceeded $1. The collection 
there is $123 not yet forwarded. 

Brow nsville — -I udge John Bond. 

Brownsville— [Haywood County's Contribution] 
— The contributors are as follows : Dr A I! Haywood, 
Glasgow Haywood, Miss Carrie Tipping, Miss Anebel 
Moore, Miss Cora Sevier, J. F. Cause. Mrs It H Ander- 
son, W A Roberts, Henry J Livingston, Jr., MissGen- 
evieve Livingston, Mrs Laura A Livingston, Miss Lucy 
C Livingston, Miss Nettie J ordon Livingston, Lev W 
L Dabney, .1 F Carter. Prof T W Crowder, E E Walk- 
er. Isaac B lira. I, I'. M Bradford, T A Tripp, Read Hay- 
wood, J B Phillips, Sr., J I! Phillips, Jr., Miss Lillian 
Phillips. Miss Edna Phillips, Cheps Bedford, I. II Bo- 
rum, W H Haywood, Dr J G Hayw I. Jr.. Robl Hay- 
wood, Miss Sallie C Gray, W R Holbrook, Miss Mary 
S Livingston, Rosa Gibson Livingston, Miss Helen 
Somervell Livingston, Unwell T Livingston, Henry 
Lee Livingston, Miss Rosa V Gibson, Miss Mat tie Dab- 
ney, Capt R S Russell. Maj L A Tie. mas. Dr. I S Pat- 
ton, John I' McLeod, Mann Wills, W E Capell, Emil 
Tamm, G II Moorer, Dr .1 c Haywood, Si-., John R 
Green, Ursula Green, Mattie C Green, Susan K Green, 
J D Green, all gave 81 each; Maj W K Bennett, 
deceased, T J Muses, deceased, Sl.oO' each ; Prof F S 
Tichenor. John W Herring, J W F Moore, W W Kut- 
ledge, A I' 1 Yancey, $2 each; T W King, Major J A 
Wilder, I' B Anderson, Lev John Williams, Capt A D 
Bright, $2 50 each ; W L Anthony, $3 ; I' R Winston, 
Lawrence W Livingston, deceased, Maj W J Somervell, 



deceased, John C Duckworth..! A Brewer, Dr John R 
Allen. Frank 1' Bond, Mrs Ella McLeskey, 11 H An- 
derson, Col Thomas Smith, Chancellor H •' Livingston, 
Mrs H .1 Livingston, (apt Alexander Duckworth, C A 
Moorer, W T Bulletin, Col Benj .1 Lea. Samuel Kille- 
brew, $5 each ; Haywood County Bank, $11.70. Total. 
$186.10. The excess over list as printed comes through 
smaller subscriptions than SI. The committee are: 
W A Dabney, Chairman, R II Anderson, Secretary, J 

W F Moore. Alex Duckworth. 

Cairo W -I Lambert. 

( ' istalian Springs — Geo Harsh. 

Chattanooga — G Andrews. Jr.. X c Atkins, Creed 
F Late-, w M Bearden, 1' F Craig, W R Crabtree, D 
W clem. B L Goulding,$5; .1 B Pound, W T Plumb, 
c 11 Snead. .1 F Shipp, T F VanValkenburg, L C 
Walker. 

(i 'rksville — Arthur II Munford; little Miss Buck- 

ner, five dollars. 

Covington — R I! Green fund, $54.35. 

Crockett — -I T Stamps. 

Fayetteville — J P Buchanan. .1 I. Buchanan, W 
II Calhoun, A .1 Carloss, N I' Carter. James Cashion, 
W R Cashion. Andrew Cashion, W H Cashion. A 
Cashion, H B Douglass, HC Dwiggins, $5; -I C Demer, 
A II Edmondson, S W Fleming. Hugh Francis, .1 C 
Goodrich, Theo Harris, Jr, F.I Higgins, 11 K Holman, 
T C Little. R K Locker, C A McDaniel, W C Morgan, 
.1 D Larks. W C Larks, .1 11 Litis. C F Pitts, C F Ren- 
egar, B T Loach. Robertson A Goodrich, J W Scott, 
J W Smith. II D Smith, A F Smith. .1 M Stewart, () 
c Tallant, E S Terry, Thomas Thomison, W P Tolley, 
R D Warren. II C Dwiggins' address is Petersburg. 

Friendshii — .1 M Cochran. 15 II Harnian, D B 
Woodson. 

Gallatin — -las W Blackmore, David F Barry, C S 
Douglass, WC Dismukes, J B Harrison, .las .1 Turner. 
Ceo F Seay, -I A Trousdale, S F Wilson. 

Grand Junction — W C Mauldrin. 

II A.RTSVILLE — .John D Stalker. 

Hillsdale — Hon Pryor W Carter. 

Jackson — F L Bullock, $5. 

Johnson's Grove — J I! Worrell. 

Lewisburg — Dibrell Bivouac, through ('apt. W. C. 
Loyd, $110. 

M \i ky City— Sid Avery. W 11 Carter, Dr IS Moore, 
C Peal. Bryant Stallings. 

McKENZIE — Through Stonewall Jackson Bivouac, 

SKi::.-!! i. 

McMlNNVH.l.E — J W Irwin. 

Monroe- I ir J M Shelton. 

Nashville Jos w Allen, Mrs J W Alien, B B 
Allen, Kate M Allen. Lieut Samuel M Allen, Mrs B B 
Allen, Walter Aiken, S T C Doak, A J Crigshy. W C 
Kelvington, -10; John J Vertrees, Lev W R L Smith, 

Rich Lkk — J Kling. Allison and Rebecca Lipscomb. 

Sweetwateb — T T Hagar. 

Qnionville — J A Moon. 

Vicksburg.— Through Col. D. A. Campbell, $403. 

Waverly — 11 C Carter. 

TEXAS. 

The following list of donations from Texas, amount- 
ing to $1,560.25, have been sent by its Treasurer, Gen. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



125 



W. H. Gaston, to Mr. John S. Ellett, Treasurer, 
Richmond. The remittances are by : 

Aaron Coffee, Collin. McKinney County •? 83 

S (' (pshaw, Hill, Hill County .' 121 

G W Arrington, Mobeete, Wheeler County ... 11 
G W Arrington, Mobeete, Wheeler County ■•■ 16 

H M Cook, Belton, Bell County " 200 

.1 I> Griffin, Alvarado, Johnson County 26 

H N Burton, Corsicana, Navarro County 70 



G W Arrington, Mobeete, Wheeler County ... v 

D T McAnally, Rice, Navarro County 20 

S M Vernon, Farmersville, Collin County 7'2 

G W Brennan, Piano, Collin County 51 

H W Barton, Corsicana, Navarro County 20 

John Traylor, Dallas, Dallas County 1 

Mrs L Person, Throckmorton, Throckmorton 

County 1<> 

W 'I' Hightower, Sweetwater, Nolan County... Pi 

Mrs Mary Key. Marshall :'. 

Aaron Coffee, Collin. McKinney County :'. 

Joe Cooper, Waxahatehie, Ellis County 15 

W I! Sebastian (citizens) Stephens County, 

Breckenridge 7<i 

Individual Subscriptions from Dallas: 

Col Job Hunter Jini 

Col John N Simpson 100 

Col W E Hughes 50 

F M Cockerel] 50 

Maj K V Tompkins 25 

W F Waltman 25 

W M C Hill 25 

Royal A Ferris .">() 

Wl, Cabell : 25 

W II Gaston 100 

I; T Bibb 10 

J li Currie 10 

From other citizens of Texas, names not re- 
corded 34 



30 
25 
75 

(Kt 
oil 

90 
00 
00 

INI 
.Ml 

25 

(HI 

INI 

00 

INI 
INI 
INI 

85 

(Kl 

(Kl 
(HI 
(HI 
INI 
(III 
IN) 
(HI 
(HI 
(HI 
(HI 
(HI 
(HI 

95 



Si OTTSVILLE — I) W Anderson. 
Union Mills— Dr. Dudley R Boston. 
Wilmington— John \V Adams. 



Total $1,560 25 

In sending the list < leu. ( label! writes that contribu- 
tions to the Davis Land Fund is not included. 

Boz — B F Forrester. 

Brownwood G H Adams. J I, Harris, V W Hender- 
son. C C Jones, J P, Smith, E R Stanley, Ed T Smith. 

Buffalo Gai — Col L F Moody. 

Coi i:m w .11; Coleman, 1, E Collins, C I. Coleman, 
Pilbain Coleman, W C Dibrell. ?.">. 

Corpus Christi — M C Spann, collection. 8177.75. 

Fort Worth— Through Mrs. B. P.. Paddock, $101.70. 

Waxahachie— A J Baxter, John P Cooper, E Chas- 
ka, Joe P Cooper, G II Cunningham, Miss Meta Coop- 
er, 811: J A Harrow. Dr W F Farmer. I; F Forrester, 
J A Cray, P. II Lattimer, M W McMight, L II Peters, 
Win Stiies, T F. Thompson, M P. Templeton. 

Brownwood— By Mrs S P Coggin, ST. 
VIRGINIA. 

Abingdon — Virgie M Gildersleeve I now Mrs. Taylor). 
Birmingham— D Walker. 
Brenner Bluff— W H Holman 
Bybee— R S White. 

Charlottesville — M Duke, George Perkins. 
Culpepper — D A Grundy. 

Palmyra— M P Pettit, Pembroke Pettit, William 
Schlater, J Shepard, G M Winn. 



A good many halves and quarters come from Pratt 
Minis, Ala. 

>Iiss Jennie Smith, of Blackshear. Ga.. sends ?4, 
with as many nanus. 

M. P. Burgwin, Jackson, X. ('.. sends S4 with the 

names of lour friends. 




126 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



i i ■i:k for alcoholism. 



A.V INSTITUTE FOB Tills FEARFUL DISEASE ESTAB- 
LISHED l.\ NASHVILLE. 



It is with a greal deal of pleasure thai we announce 
the opening of an Institute in Nashville for the cure 
of Alcoholism, th< Morphine and Tobacco habits. 

The treatment used will be that of Dr. Mark M. 
Thompson, President and Founder of the National 
Bi-chloride of Gold Company, ol Chicago, 111. 

This wonderful cure, which has been successfully 
used for the past seven years, is unqualifiedly endorsed 
by Leading clergymen and the national officers of the 
\V. ('. T. 1". It possesses all the advantages of other 
famous cures, and is in many vital respects superior 
to any other known to science. 

Dr. A. C. Potter, late house physician of the parent 
institute at Chicago, a physician of many years suc- 
cessful practice and a Christian gentleman of the 
highest order, is the Medical Director of the Nashville' 
Institute. Mr. C. L. Frost, well known to many of 
Nashville's business men, will act as business manager. 
These gentlemen will guarantee an absolute cure or 
money refunded. We clip the following from a recent 
addrc-- of Hon. John V. FarwelLthe famous dry goods 
merchant of Chicago, and none the less famous as a 
Christian philanthropist : 

" I fully believe that Cod can and sometimes does 
take away all desire for liquor from a man, and I be- 
lieve just as fully that ( oid has revealed to l>r. Thomp- 
son the scientific cure for drunkenness. God will not 
do for a man what the man can do for himself, or what 
others can do for him in a scientific way ; and now 
that this great secret has been thus revealed, drinking 
men are without excuse for continuing in their bond- 
age. I consider this Bi-chloride of (odd Cure one of 
the greatest scientific discoveries of the age.'' 

The promoters of the "Nashville Institute, Bichlo- 
ride of Cold Treatment," will cheerfully give consul- 
tation and information, free of charge, to those who 
may be interested. 

Their down-town office is Room 30, Cumberland 
Presbyterian Building, Nashville, Tehn. Write to or 
call on them. 

N. B. — They have a special proposition to make to 
Camps of Confederates, W. C. T. U. and all temper- 
ance societies throughout Tennessee and the South. 



flfr^ ARE YOU .. 

afflicted with CATARRH, BRONCHITIS, 

ASTHMA, CONSUMPTION, 

or any disease of the 
THROAT AN1> LUNGS? 

Send for a book of 100 pages, mailed free, describing 
treatment and Its proper use In each disease. Treatment 
by Inhalation. 

Absolute cure and satisfaction guaranteed. 

THE SPECIFIC OXYGEN CO. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 




THE KIMBALL. 

ATLANTA, GA., is fortunate In the location "f its leading hotel, 
"The Kimball," situated, as It Is. In the very heart of Ibe city, 
surrounded by the busy marts of trade, and In close proximity to the 

Union Depot, wher nt-rall the great lines of railroad, and from 

whence radiate o> every purl <>r the city the splendid system of elec- 
trlc street railways and steam dummy lines. 

A description of tiiis great hotel, with its 4-50 roomB, and accom- 
modations for 1,000 guests, would be entertainii g. 

^Foster & Webb, 

Printers, 
Stationers, 
Binders, 
Blank Books, 

211 CHURCH ST., 
NASHVILLE TENN 



We make a specialty of printing for Confederate Camps and other 
Veteran organlzat i> 'tis. 

We bave In our posst BSlt leclros i>r all Confederate thtijs, which 

may in- printed in colors on stationery, etc, 

lii i- Confederate Veteran is printed by our establishment and 
Is submitted as a specimen of mir work. 



RIVERSIDE MILLS 

Manufacture the lolowng grades of 

CORN MEAL. 

Bolted Meal, Morgan's Matchless Meal, l'earl Meal. 
Also Hominy, Grits, and Graham Flour. All grocers 
handling the product of Riverside Mills are authorized 
to guarantee satisfaction. Ask your grocer for River- 
side Mills Meal, and insist on having it furnished, and 
you will not fail to have good corn bread. 

CALVIN MORGAN, Proprietor. 




CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



NASHVILLE HEALING INSTITUTE 



All Chronic Cases 

... A Specialty ... 



Hte- Cures Rheumatism, Catarrh, Neuralgia. Opium and Whisky Habits, and many other 
diseases. We also give Electro-Therapeutic Baths. 

Rooms 18, 20 and 22 Fish Building, 230-232 N. Summer St. 

Take Elevator. ap-lyr 



127 

E. W. AVERELL. 
PRACTICAL JKWELBK, 

21B'_ Union St . up stairs. 

NASHVILLE. TFNN. 

References.— "Capt. E, W. Averell - .. 
member in good standing of Cheatham Biv- 
ouac, V. C. v., T. I>. Jno. P. Hickman. 

mai-lyr v Cretan/," 




A. W. WOOD, Merchant Tailor. 




FINE WOOLENS 

AND JEANS. 



DYEING, CLEANING AND REPAIRING 



NEATLY DONE. 



JONAS TAYLOR," 




316 NORTH CHERRY STREET, NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Horse Shoeing of all kinds Neatly Done. 

WE I 

Dr. Robert's Patent Hoof Expander, 

For the cure and prevention of Contraction* 
Quarter Cracks, Corns, etc 




BETTER THAN GOLD! 

A CLEAR, HEALTHFUL COMPLEXION! 
Mme. A. RUPPERT'S FACE BLEACH, 

Its wonderful effect in 
known In almost every 
household. Thousands 
who bad diseases and dis- 
colors! ion of the akin (In- 
cluding moths, freckles, 
B&llowness.cxcesslYered* 

ne98,p<nip]es,nlark heads. 

1 illness, etc ) im\ e bad 
their hearts gladdened by 

IT IS ABSOLUTE- 
LY HARMLESS, all 

1 prominent [>h\*trians 
recommend It. It does 
not drive the Impurities 
In, but draws them out. 
it is not a cosmetic to 
cover up, but a cure. 

ITS PRICE IS 
^REASONABLE. 
'One bottle, which 
costs $ a, is often sufficient to cure; or threebnttles. usually 
required, |5. Preparations sent, seeurt Iv packed In a plain 
wrapper. Mme, Rur.pert'8 book "How to be ResutlfuV* 
sent for 6 cents. Mme. A. Kufpkbt. 

FOR SALE BY C. R. BADOUX, 

A lso dealer in Hair anil Fancy Q Is, 

226 North Summer Street, Nashville, Tenn. 

POSITIONS GUARANTEED, 

If you will take full course in 
DRAUCHON'S 

Consolidated Practical Business College, 

Nashville, Tenn. No vacation. Enter dow. 
Bend for catalogue. Address J. F. Draughon, 
President. Mi niton this paper. 

UMBRELLAS, PARASOLS AND CANES. 

First-class Recovering and Repairing. 
LACE . COVERS . FOR . PARASOLS. 

FACTORY ASP BTOBS, 

222 North Summer Street. Nashville, Tenn. 
R. BORGNIS & CO. 

All Kinds of Brushes to Order. 



Nashville Brush Factory, 

P. GLKASON, PROPRIETOR. 

COTTON MOPS, DDSTERS AND WHISKS. 

BROOMCORN BROOMS. 
112 South Market Street, NASHVILLE, TENN. 



H. S. HAILEY, 



WHOLES \ I B 



FRUITS AND NUTS, 

119 N. Market St.. Nashville, Tenn. 

Solicit* I Telephone 1082. 
, 

Cleveland Says, 

Smoke "Baby Ruth." 

The Noted Five-Cent Cigar. 

I k \ i< ^i PPL1 ED BY 

SIDNEY HENLEIN& CO., Nashville, Tenn. 
DR. T. G. BRACKING, 

The Famous Panopathlc 
Physician and Surgeon, 

With thirteen years' hospital, mllltarj and 
private practice, whose wonderful cur 
so well known all over t tils a ntlnenl 
the British Isles; tells your distases without 
asking questions, and treats all female and 
nervous diseases, tumors, cancers, hemor- 
rhoids, catarrh and kidney afflictions, the 
eye, ear, throat, etc, with phenomenal suc- 
cess. He nuikcs themoRt happy cures when 

all els,- fails. I No incurable cases taken. 
Thousands of references in Nashville anil all 
o\ er i ins country. 

155 North Cherry Street, Nashville, Tenn. 

THE 

Fin cs t St a tion cry 



Wheeler 
Publishing Company *s. 

NASHVILLE. TENN. 



Any book in print sent on receipt oj the 
publisher's price. 



DERBY DAY! 



The merchants and manufactu- 
rers of Nashville should encourage 
the Cumberland Park management 
by giving a half-holiday on .. .. 



MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED. 



Saturday, April 29th, 



from 1 to 5.30 p. m.. to enable every- 
body to witness the greatest race 
ever seen in Tennessee. No admis- 
sion will be charged to the infield 
on that day. .. The race will be 
worth nearly $6,000 to the winner, 
and it now looks as though there 
would be fifteen or twenty of the 
best three-year-olds in the West to 
start for this rich stake. 



128 

\V c ' i < i I.I.IKIt. l'n -i.l. nt. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



I'ni'K TAYLOR, Vice President. 



11. LOUIS SI'KKUY, Secretar) hm.I Treasurer. 



AtTTHOBlZ B.D C A. FIT .A. HI, $100,000. 



W. C. Collier Grocery Company, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 



FINE IMPORTED A1T.D DOMESTIC GROCERIES. 
Nos. 6oi and 003 Church Street, NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Rangum 
Root 



Is the 
Best 
In the 
World 



It will Cure 
A Man 

or his kind more certainly and more 
rapidly than any other Liniment on 
.earth, of Rheumatism, Pains, Swell- 
ings, Bruises, Sprains, Soreness, 
Stiffness, Sore Throat or Chest, Pain 
in Back and Joints, Corns, Warts 
and Bunions, Insect Bites and Stings, 
Frostbite, Cramps, Aches, Cuts and 
Wounds. It will as surely cure 

A Horse 

or his kind of Spavin, Splint, Ring- 
bone, Windgalls, Puffs, Swin- 
ey, Scratches, Swellings, Br.iises, 
Sprains, Hurts, Cuts Wounds. Sore- 
ness, Stiffness, Knots, Harness and 
Saddle Hurts. 

SPURLOCK.'NEAL & CO.. Nashville, Tw.. 



MISS L. A. -WHEELER, 

MASSAGE - TREATMENT, 

Rooms 17, 19 and 21, Fish Block, 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Electric and Hot Air Baths, etc. 
Sea Salt with Massage. 
Hours from 2 P. M. to tj p, M, 



Hair and Fancy Goods. 
Hair Dressing and 
Manicure Parlors. 



Mrs. M. MclNTYRE. Manager, 

CHURCH ST., NASHVILLE. rENN. 

cote. VOCEL'S 

POK 

FINE TAILORING. 

233 North Summer Street. 
Nashville, Tenn. 

LINCKS LAUNDRY 



DOES THE 
BEST WORK. 



LOOK 



GRAY'S 

NEVER-FAILING 



PILE OINTMENT 

Is sold under a positive quarantee to 

CURE 

Blind, Bleeding-, Itching 

and every form of 

or money refunded. All drug- 
gists keep It. Price, 50cts. 
DR.W. F. GRAY 4 CO. Nashville Tenn. 



H ERE! 



WALTER WINSTEAD, 



DEALER IN 



Fine Boots and Shoes, 

508 Church St., Nashville, Tenn. 

ap-6m 




W. S. FINLY, 703 Church St., Nashville, Tenn. 

Makes the above oiler to the readers of THE 
Veteran, and proposes-to deliver the watch 
mi receipt oi Mist payment. Every watch 
guaranteed. Call and see him, or write to 
him. ap-Bm 

E. M. FORBS & CO. 

Tin and Slate Roofing, Guttering, Piping, 4c. 

Tin Roofs Repaired and Painted. 
Galvanized Iron Gutter and Pipe. 

37 Bridge Ave. (ap-6m) Nashville. Tenn. 
Latest and Best 

BECKWITH & CO'S. 



Thermo Ozone Battery. 




The most powerful and the cheapest 'I., ice 
fur treatment and cure of diseases liv elec- 
tricity. Rheumatism, Colds, Neuralgia, In- 
somnia, and many other ailments attributed 
to impure or Impoverished blood, [ndispen- 
sllile to overworked students and profes- 
sional men, who are thus assured of a peace- 
ful night's rest Always ready, l'rice. -Iii.iki. 
Try it. satisfaction guaranteed, or money 
refunded within thirty days. 

Write for information to 

GILLESPIE & STONES, General Agents, 

ill South Market Street, 
212 North Summer Street, 
Nashville, Tenn. 






There never was a better Beer brewed, and never before has any 
Beer obtained such a reputation in so short a time as 

The proof, of course, is 
in the drinking. Try it. 
Convince yourself. 



Established 1867. 



NASHVILLE BEER! 



THE WM. GERST BREWING CO. 

GIVE US YOUR PATRONAGE. NASHVILLE, TENN. 



FRANK ANDERSON & CO , 

WHOLESALE 

Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 

204 MARKET SQUARE, 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



J. S. OWEN & CO. 




now \ iiitir ■ ii 1 1- \ i .«• . . 



^^ PIANO OR ORGAN? 

Y' ID HAV] nil \ PHOMISIXU IT TO Vi 'I'll 
D W '.II UK FOli \ I.mM; TIME. 

We Have What She Wants, and We Sell Reasonably. 



ROBERT L. LOUD, 
mnr-lyr 2'2 KORTH SUMMER STREET. NASHVILLE. TENN 



CIRCULAR DISTRIBUTING AND 
MAILING AGENTS. 

Work done thoroughly and with despatch. 
Best Ri rereDcea 

230 NORTH SUMMER STREET, 

K> OSIS * \M> 10, 

NASHVILLE. TENN. 
Telephone 9 'A. mar-lyr 

BARBER SHOP ,|.\7> ISA ill ROOMS. 



THE rtASHVILLE AMERICAN. 

Tills old, old paper, published :n Its State Cnp'tal, has 
re of Mi, Democratic party in Ten in s- 
see for general Ions. 

ITS GREETING TO THE CONFEDERATE VETERAN 

Was typical i if ii- nature, and it Immediately enlisted 

t,, n, i\ , ii to the utmost. 



The Weekly American and the Confederate Veteran, both One Year 
for $1, the price of the American alone. 



C. BRBVKR. 

Russian and Turkish Baths 

FOR GENTLEMEN ONLY. 



WEST. JOHNSTON & CO.. RICHMOND. VA., 
Publishers. n ooksellers. and Stationers. 



THE PC Bl I - 1 1 1 



JESSE ELY 

HATS & MEN'S FURNISHING GOOD: 1 . 



No. 3i7 Church Street. Nashv.lle. Tenn. 



"Greg's History of the United Stater 

with Introduction by Gen. Wade Ham pi n. 
rhe only true history of tlie kite Civil War 
thai ha> r\ .i been publ 

ct«th, 82oU: r.ontl U . - 1. 

'• The i ' it rented in ;i masterly man- 

ner. It bears noble testimony lo the devo 
lion, i he pn1 riot ism, and t lie heroism oi the 
citizens ol the ?*outh."- ' ■■ n . Wade Hampton, 

"I have advertised the book i>\ praising li 
everywhere ever since I read it.' 1 — (Jen, Wm. 
//. Payne. 

B*".\gents for Virginia nud North Cm ■ 
fori in* Hammond fypswitiTKKS. All type- 
writer supplies. 



Ag*M fir th = Celebrated Knox Hats. 



204 North Cherry Street, Nashville, Tenn 

(I) 01»POSITR M AXWKl.I. HOI SK, 

WANTED. 

BOOK-KEKI'KRS, Clerks, Stenograi her . 
< ';i*hi. i>. Drummers, Teachers, Meehn - 
les, Housekeeper*, ailrond Men, Servants, 

i -ill persons desirine employ menl ol 

kind in any of tin- Southern orSouthwesici i 
States, add rcss, with sta nip, 

NASHVILLE KMPLOYHENT BUREAU, 
mar-lyr Nashvilli . 1 1 a s. 



WAID SEMIET-aXTST FOR "STOUXTQ LrJLIDIBS, 



303 Pupils from 20 States. 



RTASHVIIiLiB, TETXTTNT. 



Send for Catalogue. 



Unsurpassed Advantages in Every Department. 

Pupils are Taken to the Best Lectures, Concerts and Entertainments. 

Parents Determine what Churches their Daughters are to Attend. 



J. D. BLANTON, President. 



DIXIE FLYER .. THROUGH SLEEPERS BETWEEN NASHVILLE AND JACKSONVILLE, via Atlanta, Macon and Lake City. 
QUICK-STEP .. Also BETWEEN ST. LOUIS AND ATLANTA, via NASHVILLE AND CHATTANOOGA. 




i ^§&g - 

.y\ ! . .A j&yd 



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Washington Limited, ruliinaii ralace Drawing Room Sleeping Cat between Nashville and Washington, via Chattanooga, Bristol, 



Qopfederat^ l/eterap. 

Published Monthly in the Interest of Confederate Veterans and Kindred Topics. 



Price .") Cents. > 
Yea 



l'e 5 Cents. I y ] T 
ki.v :iii Cents, i » ul - *■• 



Nashville, Tenn., May, 1S93. 



-vr_ _ IS. I. CUNNINGHAM, 
i\IO. 5. -, Editor and Manoper. 




FOSTER & WEBB, PRINTERS, NASHVILLE, TENN. 



1ES3 - ias: 



The Nashville Shorthand Institute 

and Tennessee Business College. 

The Leading, The Oldest, and The Best. 

MAIN FLOOR, BAXTER COURT, NASHVILLE, TENN. 

TELEPHONE 1466. 



charles mitchell, 
Baker and Coxfkctioxek. 

Orders for Weddings ard Parlies Promptly Filled. 



Home-made Candles Fresh Dally. 



323 Union Street. Nashville. Ttnn. 



THE MOST PRACTICAL AND THOROUGHLY SYSTEMATIC 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

SHORTHAND. TYPEWRITING, BOOKKEEPING, 

PENMANSHIP AND TELEGRAPHY. 

Day and Nitfht ('lasses nil the year. Hours from 8 A. M to 10 p. w. 
Headquarters n>i all klnd> « >f Shorthand and Typewriter work. 
Reasonable j . 1 1 . ■ - and i ntlre satisfaction guaranteed. 

ALEXANDER FALL, President. 

Main Floor, Baxter Court. Telephone 1466. 

Catalogue and Terms matted -■" application. 



OX TO THE WORLD'S FAIR! 

If you are noun-, communicate >>i once with the Wom.irs 
Columbian Exposition Bureau, of Nashville, Tenn. This 
Bureau can make your \i*n more pleasant, profitable, and 
economical. 1 1 Is not local. Has the support of a number of 
Nashville's leading citizens. Pamphlets giving particulars 
nn application Address, K. K. Harris, 

Si cr< turj und Manager. :'.''i North Cherry si.. Nashville, Tenn. 



TAMES T. CAMP, 

BOOK AND JOB PRINTER 

COUNTY AND CIVIL WORK A SPECIALTY. 



Orders by mail carefully executed. Write for estimates. 

No. 817 Union Street, Nashville, Tenn. 




BUSINESS COLLEGE 



J 



Second Floor. Cole Building, 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



8®- The Most Practical Institution of its kind in the World. tt*a 

Indorsed by Merchants and Bankers. (9) Write for Catalogue. 



SOUTHERN SHORTHAND ACADEMY g EMPLOYMENT BUREAU, 

426',. UNION STREET, NASHVILLE, TENN. 

The only school In the South devoted exclusively to the training of ynuns! ladies and gentlemen in Shorthand and Tj pewritlng. The 

Academy i~ under tin- personal direction »l ii veteran teacher and n-porier— a v. teran in a double mum', uuv ng i imeneed the study of 

pbonogruplij Hi rtj veins agi>, while a prisoner of war in Rock Island, Illinois. 

Cfo r-irifl i-rl Qvctpm Ta i icrht Send for handsome Souvenir Catalogue, containtnz much valuable Informal ion about short - 
OLaiiuaiu oyoLciu idugiu. ,, ,,„,. systems rv\ lewed, . -01111,111 .sons made, deductions drawn. 

•^SITUATIONS SECURED FOR GRADUATES."" 




BURNS & COMPANY. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



SADDLES, BRIDLES AND HARNESS, 



DEALERS IN 



Saddlery Hardware and Turf Goods. 



31 1 and 313 NORTH MARKET STREET 



NASHVILiTjE, TEJKT3NT. 



Confederate Veteran. 



Published Monthly in the Interest of Confederate Veterans and Kindred Topics. 



Price, "i Cents. ( "\77-it T 
Yearly, 50 Cents. / VOL,. 1. 



Nashville, Tenn., May, 1893. 



s. A CUNNINGHAM, 



"Vr ,- (S. A. CUNMNGHA. 

1\0. 5' I Editor and Manage 



Entered at the Postofflce, Nashville, Tenn.. as second-class matter. 

Special club rates to the Press and to (amps— 25 copies $10. 

An extra copy sent to each person who Bends six subscriptions. 

Advertisements: One dollar per inch one time, or 810 a year, ex- 
cept la.-t page; $25 a page. Discount: Half year, one-Issue; one 
year, one issue. 



• y rr.t/, rr //< , (¥?€-» 



f j/ j; . 



May, 



/^f 3. 



SUBSCRIBER, COMRADE, FRIEND: 

This letter is to you. Will you respond to it? The CONFEDERATE 
VETERAN was started on a less prominent plan than it is, at the very 
low price of 50 cents Through a spontaneous expression of approval, 
from almost every section of Dixie, the determination was made to 
improve it, without increase of price. Strangers have taken hold of 
chance copies and raieed clubs without commission, until the publi- 
cation is already accepted as a success, and all known comments have 
been of praise. While these facts have thrilled the projector with 
hope, other facts have been very depressing. Personal friends have 
been addressed and re-addressed against an unbroken silence. 
Thousands of subscribers have never written a word of counsel or 
seemed to feel that more was due from them than the payment of 50 
cents. Now, good friend, this letter is to you with a request. 
Won't YOU write me a letter before June 1st, and if possible send 
two new subscribers? Anyhow, won't you write and tell me that you 
have asked or written somebody to eend an advertisement? If each 
subscriber would do this much the immediate benefits would inure to 
you and to our cause. Please don't fail to write and let me know 
of your personal approval. Will YOU do it? 

The most unhappy fact in connection with this publication is the 
inability to supply back numbers. The farther it goes into the year 
the more earnest the desire for back numbers, yet all are gone but 
April. The edition begun at 5,000, and has not gone above 6,000, 
yet compliance with the request herein made would create a need for 
10,000 copies at once. To you, comrade in the remote part of Dixie, 
farmer or mechanic, as well as to you, merchant prince, thi-s request 
is made. To you, fair sons and daughters of veterans, also is this 
request earnestly made. Write a letter and co-operate in increasing 
the list or explain that the VETERAN don't suit you. Write that you 
have suggested some advertiser to use it for influence in every part 
of the South. It possesses high merit for advertisers. 

By compliance with the foregoing requests you will demonstrate 
your loyalty to one another and secure a periodical of which all 
Southerners will be proud. _ j 



4^\S\*4sls*S*^MC>, I 



130 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN". 



The letter on the preceding page is for every reader. 
It would eosl largely over one hundred dollars, and 
much time mailing, if senl in the usual way. There 
i- a peril always to new publications, and friends to 
the Veteran should no1 forgel that they could, in a 
wck. accomplish that which would make it a lasting 
honor as well as a permanency . 

The saddest reminescence thai I have so far heard 
in connection with the noble work undertaken was 
the remark of a friend, wli<> is Commander of the 
Camp that has had more attention in these columns 
than any other, not excepting the Frank Cheatham 
Bivouac, who said: "Those fellows arc working the 
thing well. They go to the spot and say. 'Here is 
the book! Give me your dollar.'" See the picture: 
A Republican takes advantage of our loyal sentiment 
to the name Confederate, gets in with a Republican 
newspaper owning a lot of old cuts, publishes a pe- 
riodical of less than half the size at double the price, 
and can tbereby afford to employ solicitors on large 
commissions. The circulation of that journal will 
tend to divert from the splendid sentiment manifest 
in the Confederate Veteran, which is regarded as 
worthy of the patronage of the entire South. If our 
people .support the New York publication in prefer- 
ence it would be a humiliation to the influence that 
seeks to do all possible for our people at the lowest 
possible price. There never was a time when more 
careful discrimination should 1"- made, [f the Vet- 
eran is not loyal to the center repudiate it. If it is 
worthy stand up for it now. Make known its merit so 
that others through you will do likewise. 



A Lexington. Ky., I lonfederate of much prominence 
has this to Say in a recent letter: "Regarding the 
'Confederate' War Journal, published in Lexington, Ky., 
and New York, I know very little ahout: have seen a 
copy, but have not had time to peruse it. I know Mr. 
Ben Labree very well, lie came to this city several 
years ago from the North, and aside from his politics 
(Republican i I think he is a gentleman and a very 
worthy man. 1 think he is in a position t.. do some 
good with his paper, as he deals altogether in the past, 
and has access to a held that needs to be printed." 



Rev. John R. Deeiing, Versailles, Ky.. April 28, 
1893: "Before me lies the 'Confederate' War Journal, 
published in New York! 'It solicits the aid and co- 
operation of the Southern people, and especially that 
of the gallant officers and men who followed the stars 
and bars.' Et hopes ' that its purposes and aims will 
be heartily met and encouraged by the Southern 
people.' It 'solicits the judgment of a fair-minded, 
discriminating public." This is in its Salutatory. And 
yet this same 'Salutatory' refers to our civil war four 
times as the 'rebellion,' 'great rebellion,' etc.! Per- 
haps this is to please Northern-Southerners. No 
doubt it will pay them, and they will pay for what 
they get The 'discriminating public' of our South- 
land knows our conflict as the ' War between the 
States.' There was a rebellion once, in colonial days, 



but it was made against a king called George. It bad 
no ' Confederate side, 1 every colony being in it. Out 
of that struggle came thirteen ' free and independent 
States.' Between these a 'late unpleasantness' did 
exist, but surely no 'discriminating' Southerner ever 
ined thai that was a ' rebellion.' Subjects rebel. 

The war was between States, not subjects. Tile Mat. s 
seceded M 11. I the State> Hl'l'c overpowered aild le-toled. 

1 am L r lad tie' publishers of this journal gave their 
key-note in the first number. Every soldier will 
know what sort of music to expect. From Hercules' 
foot I judge thai the ('Confederate') man will be of 
slim pattern and short lived. The VETERaN, of Nash- 
ville, that i- in Tennessee, and that is in our South- 
land 1 , i- g 1 .nough for me. Let me go unrepre- 
sented, if need be. but ll"t 1 1 1 i - lepiesel i tei 1 . and that 

in a • ( lonfederate war journal.'" 



Geo. E. Dolton, St. Louis. Mo., May 1 .*, 1893: - I am 
in receipt of the April number of the Confederate 

VETERAN, and inclose herewith subscription. I wish 
you would send me all the back numbers, as I would 
like my file complete. I like the magazine, and yet I 
do not like it — I wish it were a weekly and full of 
letters from those who wore the gray, fighting over 
the battles as they fought and saw them. 1 stood in 
front of their shells and bullets for 178 days; that is, 
was actually under their fire that long, and having 
stood that, I am not afraid that any of them can write 
any accounts of the past which 1 cannot relish. Be- 
sides, I love the heroism displayed by the gray, and I 
eagerly read everything I can find written of the war 
by one who wore it. I never had an unpleasant word 
during the war. nor since, with one who wore tin 1 gray. 
I wore the blue. I have mingled with the gray, since 
the war, in Missouri. Arkansas. Indian Territory, 
Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, 
Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, and West Virginia. Give 
us a paper like the National Tribunt — as far as the cor- 
respondence, or letters, is concerned. Stir up the 
old < onfcilcrates to write. 1 want to know how it was 
on that side of the line everywhere. I have traveled 
six hundred miles before now just to learn how it was 
on your side at a single point. 1 am carefully study- 
ing the War Records, but they do not satisfy. I want 
more detail, and I know that every wide-awake Con- 
federate would enjoy such articles, and so would hun- 
dreds of thousands of those who won- the blue. My 
being one of the two who started the Grand Army of 
American Veterans .the other being one of Gen. Lee's 
men i shows about how I feel toward those who were — 
part of the time— on the other side of the breast- 
works. I am a subscriber for the ConfederaU War 
Journal, which you do not admire. It may be worth 
something after a while. I live in hopes, but ex] t 

to be dead about one hundred years before it reaches 
the end of what I am interested in at its present rale 
of progress." The foregoing letter is from the office 
of the Grand Army of American Veterans, composed 
of those wdio wore the blue and the gray. 



The University of tfu Sunt/, Magazine issued a superb 
memorial number to Gen. E. Kirby-Smith. It con- 
tains a full and authentic biographical sketch of the 
General, carefully prepared by Gen. Francis A. Shoup, 
D. D., a distinguished Confederate general, and a life- 
long friend of the beloved hero. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



131 



The splendid full-page picture of Mr. Davis on title 
page is copied from a large photograph thai he sent 
Mrs. S. E. Brewer, now of Nashville, but who lived in 

Havana when he was released from prison, and en- 
tertained him and his family for some time afterward. 
When Mr. Davis left Cuba he went to Baltimore, 
where this picture was made. The following auto- 
graph note is on the margin of the picture : 

"Mrs. Sarah E. Brewer, with the respect and n 

of her friend, -1i:i 1 ERSON Davis." 

Mrs. Brewer's zeal for the Davis Monument may be 
realized in the fact that she subscribed 8500 to it 
directly, and has in addition secured $300 through 
subscribing $1,000 to a church in Nashville on condi- 
tion that the $300 be subscribed by members of that 
church t" the monument. 

The venerable lady is zealous for the Veteran as 
well. She has procured nearly forty subscribe] 
though very feeble and rarely able t<> leave her house. 



PROMISE or a BARGAIN 



A glance will show the back cover page as a unique 
place for advertising. As an experiment and a mat- 
ter of interest this page will he furnished the adver- 
tiser for June who will give a written oiler of the 
largest price for it. Part of the page was under a con- 
tract for a year, hut it is now clear and we will try the 
spirit of business men. The price for that page is .*2 
per inch for each insertion; that would be $54, but il 
may go for half that, or for $1. The written proposi- 
tion should be mailed by June 6. 



The Daughters of the Confederacy in Missouri have 
shown something of what can be accomplished by a 
patriotic people. Without State appropriation or 
other public aid they have, by persistent zeal, erected 
the superb Home reported and illustrated in this Vet- 
bran. In an appeal to pay off the balance of a lia- 
hility upon the property, aggregating nearly $2,000, 
the President, Mrs. M. A. E. McLure, -ays: •■This 
monument to the energy of the women of Missouri 
must not be presented to the state Association before 
being paid for. To avoid the necessity of borrowing 
money we feel thai it is only necessary t" lay this 
matter before the ladies of the Smith." 



The destruction of Miss A. M. Zollicoffer's studio at 
the home of her brother-in-law, J. B. Bond, Esq . in 
Maury County, occurred at night, last month, and she 
barelj escaped from the flames, she had about $1,000 
worth of paintings on hand. The most valuable of 
them all. in an historic sense, was a portrait of her fa- 
ther. Gen. Zollicoffer, which she had just completed 
for the room named in his honor at the Tennessee 
Soldiers' Hotne. It was a contribution to the Home. 
In this calamity there will be sympathy throughout 
the South. There are living five of the six daughters 



to the General; besides Miss '/.. the four others are 
Mrs. Wilson, of Nashville; Mrs. Metealf. of Fayette- 
ville; Mrs. Sansom, of Knoxville; and Mrs. Bond. 
In the fire mentioned Mr. Bond lost a very fine law 
library. 



Washington, Ga., doe- well her part in keeping 
alive the spirit of patriotism. At the dedication of 
Confederati - last month Capt. John T. Hester, 

a former citizen of the place, delivered tin 1 address. 
While paying tribute to the progressive spirit and the 

thrift of the people, he said : 

"Who does not love the home of his birth? Who 
due- not love the land of the magnolia and the honey- 
suckle.' Who does not love Georgia- her hills and 
her valley- from mountains to her sea-girt shores? 
loe- not love his whole country, from the granite 
hills of New England to the prairies of the Lorn 
State, from the shores of the Atlantic to the rocky 
el ill's of the Pacific? But, what means this large as- 
semblage of your citizens ' Every eye that glistens 
a tear, every bosom that graces a garland, every flag 
that marks the resting place of a hero, tell us that we 
ue here to honor the memory of the men who strug- 
gled and who died for the sovereignty of the St 
and who. for full four years, stood as a -tone wall of 
-e between your homes and the invaders of your 
country ! " 

In speaking of individual achievements and hero- 
ism, he paid this beautiful tribute to Robert Toombs: 

"He who wore the insignia of rank deserves no 
more of oty flowers and our tears to-day than the gal- 
lant privates in the rank and tile of our army, who 
followed wherever he dared to lead. Vet there is one 
wdio drew his -word in defense of his country's rights, 
and if I could usurp the inspiration of the artist and 
wear the chaplel of the gifted Bculptor, I would claim 
to chisel his name upon the highest niche of fame. 
Not alone because 1c was a soldier, not because he 
was allied to this people by education and association, 
hut because in the legislative halls of our country, 
when danger threatened, he manifested the intrepidity 
of the warrior, the sagacity of tin 1 statesman, and the 
manliness of tie Southerner." 

On every grave was a card hearing the picture of a 

Confederate flag in colors, and under it the Lim 

■■ 1 if liberty born of a patriot's dream; 
1 If a storm cradled nation that fell." 

In this connection special reference is made to Mr. 

Henry Cordes, of Washington, who has remitted more 

subscriptions more times to the Veteran than any 

other person. He ha- shown patriotic zeal, for which 

he deserves gratitude ami honor. 



N ISHVILLE is entertaining, as this i - to 

press, the Southern Baptist ( 'on vent ion, with delegates 
from Maryland to Mexico, There are many old sol- 
diers among them, and each one is invited to call at 
the American building for a copy complimentary. 



The time for issuing has never been first of the 
month. It is nearer the fifteenth. Patrons who have 
subscribed recently may expect it about such time. 



132 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



Tin: Selma Times gives an interesting sketch of Col. 
John H. Caldwell, of Jacksonville, Ala., concerning 
his experience with a Yankee during and after the war. 

At the time of tin- battle of Seven Pines the Confed- 
erate was looking after bis wounded when he found a 
young soldier in blue who was bleeding profusely 
from a wound in the thigh. He also had a sabre cut 
back of his ear. The officer gave him a canteen con- 
taining whisky, and told him to drink freely of it, and 
that he would send for it Later, before the infirmary 
corps got there the Federals had rescued their comrade. 

Soon after the war Colonel Caldwell was solicitor of 
his circuit, and wanted to go over into St. Clair County 
to prosecute some fellows who had been violating the 
law. They were bushwhackers during the war, and 
had sworn that if he went to Ashville they would kill 
him. 

It was against the martial law for an ex-Con federate 
to be caught with a pistol without a permit, and 
Colonel Caldwell went before the commander of tin' 
garrison at Jacksonville and stated his case. 

The officer wrote a note to the young man who 
issued the permits directing him to "issue Colonel 
Caldwell an order to bear arms." 

They talked of war times; the Colonel told t hi- 
story, and the Federal, embracing him, said: ■'Jam 
the soldier boy whose life you saved, and here is the 
wound in the thigh." And then throwing back his 
heavy locks he showed the sabre cut. " Yes, you can- 
not only get a permit to bear arms, but I will go along 
and help defend you with my life if necessajry, for you 
are the man who saved mine." 



Tiik Richmond and Danville Railroad Company 

Will. FURNISH TRANSPORTATION FOR PASSENGERS TO THE 

Davis burial at Richmond fob a trifle over one 

CENT PER MILE EACH WAY. 



It is a humorous incident in the stories told^upon 
Robert Toombs, mention of whom is made in the 
diary of Alexander II. Stephens, herein printed, that 
when lie had gone to the National Capital, from his 
home at Washington, ll;i„ to visit a gentleman of 
wealth, who met him at the station with his carriage, 
and in the good cheer of meeting forgot to inquire for 
his baggage until they had journeyed quite a distance. 
Then, startled at the oversight, he said: "What did 
you do with your baggage?" "I broke it," was 
Toombs' cool reply. 



There is an error on the editorial page, where the 
types make "in iniquity" read "in equity." Tis a 
pity that so mean a spirit ever actuated any people to 
be so ungrateful when possessing such fortunate and 
agreeable surroundings as to make this criticism nec- 
essary. The South will not lie robbed of her old-time 
glory. 

It is reported that the body of the Hon. Alexander 
II. Stephens will he finally buried about the time that 
Mr. Davis is buried at Richmond. It would be fitting 
in Georgia to have that ceremony to her distinguished 
son at the time Mr. Davis' body lies in state at Atlanta. 

Bear in mind that the place to leave your measure for a good 
fitting Dress Shirt is the Vanderbilt Shirt Co., Nashville, Tenn. 



■TWILL BE .1 SIGHT WORTH SEEING. 

Camp Hardee of Confederate Veterans, at Birming- 
ham, Ala., proposes to have at the Annual Reunion, 
which takes place in that city on the l'.lth ami 20th of 
July, the finest entertainment ever seen at such a 
meeting. The camp is erecting now a hall with seats 
to accomodate (i.iKKi people, with a stage lot! feet long. 
One of the prettiest scenes will consist of eleven of the 
most beautiful women, selected one from each, of the 
Southern States. This will be in tableau. Bach 
State boasts with reason of the beauty of its women, 
ami eleven of the most beautiful women in all the 
South will be a sight as rare as it will be unique, and 
will never be forgotten. The most perfect type of 
beauty, the spiritual combined with the physical, finds 
it> home in the Southern States. The creamy blonde 
of Virginia will contrast with the brilliant brunette of 
Texas and Louisiana. This feature is to be only one 
in a series of others, but if each State will do justice 
to herself there can be nothing left to imagination — 
the real will excel it. 



THEIR H'O/JA' OF RALSIXG lit OX CM EXT FUNDS. 

S.A.Cunningham, chairman of the Davis Monu- 
mental Committee for the State of Tennessee, Nash- 
ville, Tenn.: Dear Sir — In order that 1 may make a 
proper report to the Association of I'nited Confederate 

Veterans, which will meet at Birmingham, Ala., on 
the l'.lth and 20th of July next, I respectfully ask that 
you render me a report of the work done by your 
committee in the State of Tennessee by the loth of 
June next. Hoping that you have had great success, 
I am your comrade, W. L. Cabell, 

Lieut. <;•!<. United Confederate Veteran*. Trun.s-Mixsixsijipi D<i>t., 
Chairman Jefferson Damn Monumental Committee. 

Dallas, Texas, May 1. 1893. 

The compliance with General Cabell's request is of 

thi' highest importance. In States where the com- 
mittees have not been at work, ami local organizations 
have secured funds, it is desirable that report be made 
within the time designated. The Veteran will con- 
tain report of all data sent to it. In Tennessee all 
friends who have taken part in the cause are requested 
to give notice to the Chairman. 



HELP NOW THE KIRBY SMITH FUND. 

Having been appointed Treasurer of the K. Kirby- 
Smith Relief fund by Gen. W. II. .lackson, Depart- 
ment Commander, I am ready to receive such contri- 
butions as the benevolence of sympathetic friends may 
tender, to discharge the debts of the dead ( ieneral, and 
should there be an excess of funds, to give the bereaved 
family the surplus. It is necessary that some one 
individual shall charge himself with the duty of 
soliciting aid in his vicinity. Friends, comrades, the 
necessity exists; your benevolence can and will place 
a most worthy family on the plane of self-support. 
Be quick, send in your aid. Fraternally, 

Thos. Claiborne, Treas. 

Nashville, Term., May 11, 1893. 

Vanderbilt Shirt Co., at Nashville, Tenn., will send you bill 
of prices and forms of measurement on application. 






CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



t-33 



MY LOVE AND I. 



BY ASA HARTZ, PRISONER OF WAR. 



My love reposes on a rosewood frame, 

A bunk have I, 
A couch of feathery down fills up the same, 

Mine's straw, hut dry ; 
She sinks to sleep at night, with scarce a sigh, 
With waking eyes I watch the hours go by. 

My love her daily dinner takes in state, 

And so do I (?) 
The richest viands flank her silver plate, 

Coarse grub have I. 
Pure wine she sips at case, her thirst to slake, 
I pump my drink from Erie's crystal lake. 

My love has all the world, at will to roam, 

Three acres I ; 
She goes abroad, or quiet stays at homi , 

So cannot 1. 
Bright angels watch around her couch at night, 
A Yank, with loaded gun keeps me in sight. 

A thousand weary miles now stretch between 

My love and I, 
To her, this winter night, calm, cold, serene. 

I waft a sigh. 
And hope with all my earnestness of soul 
To-morrow's mail may bring my parole. 

There's hope ahead ! We'll some day meet again, 

My love and I ; 
We' 

Her love-lit eye, 
Will all ray many troubles then beguile. 
And keep this wayward Keb. from Johnson's Isle. 
Johnson's bland, February, 1861. 

The above is published in compliment toacomrade 

wlio copied this paper wlien written and has kept it 
all these years. It is not in good spirit. The pris- 
oner's "Love" was not in luxury. She gave many a 
"sigh," and she had not "all the world to roam at 
will." It will be helpful to recall the errors in it. 
The copy conies from Tampa, Fla. 



11 tears of sorrow then. 



BILL ARP'.-i FACTORY YARN. 



* * * The signs of the times are very hopeful. 
Action and reaction is the law of human progress. 
We make war and we make peace. We abuse one 
another and afterwards comes the love feast. The 
pendulum is always swinging. A few years ago a 
Northern man would hardly have ventured South to 
tell us what he thought of us. Now he goes and 
comes and says what he pleases and his utterance s are 
courteously tolerated. Old father Time is a wonder- 
ful doctor. I have been under his treatment and find 
myself better — better in charity and hope ami 
humanity — with a broader patriotism and less preju- 
dice with more philosophy and less bigotry and con- 
ceit. I think 1 am improving daily, and will soon be 
ready to certify that old doctor Time is a wonderful 
man, and that his medicine is good. 

Our American people are never as mad with 'one 
another as they think they are. It is a kind of sur- 
face enmity, while the heart beats warmer than they 
are willing to admit. Let a Yankee and a Georgian 
meet together in Egypt or Peru, or on the Suez canal, 
and they instantly become friends, and would defend 
each other to the very death. The love of country 
makes us kin, and kindred makes us kind. 

When I was a merchant in a country town I man- 
aged somehow to provoke the enmity of my principal 



competitor. To avenge himself he put out posters 
that he would undersell anybody regardless of cost or 

profit, and added a codicil that he would sell factory 
yarn ten cents a bunch cheaper than it could be 
bought in the village. Determined to keep up with 
the sensation, I put out my posters to the effect that 
I was going to sell my goo, Is so cheap Spence would 
have to give his away or take down his handbill. The 
first day of the contest a customer called for two 
bunches of yarn. 8s ami 10s. I didn't have the 10s, 
but 1 gave him a bunch of 8s for nothing, on condition 
he would buy the 10s at Speiico's. lie went down 
forthwith, and asking the price, Spence looked straight 
at him and -ays : " What did A.rp charge you tor that 
bunch?" " Nothing," says be. "he i- giving it away." 
With a spasmodic jerk, Spence threw down a bunch 
on the counter and snapped a dime by the side of it. 
"There's your yarn, sir, and there's your money. I'll 
see who can play this little game the longest." Well, 
I wasn't foolish enough to play it any move, but from 
that day our intercourse was much more limited than 
our animosity. We never came to a pitched battle, 
but it was a regular skirmish all summer. Early in 
the fall Spence went to New York, and I followed a 
few days after. Arriving about midnight, the hotel 
clerk said that they were very much crowded, but if 1 
diil n't mind bedding with a ( Georgian, he could accom- 
modate me. I was codducted to the room, and as the 
light shone in my bedfellow's face I saw it wasSpem e, 
and Spence saw it was me. There was no time to cal- 
culate, or say prayers, and we didn't want any, for no 
two brothers ever gave each other a more earnest and 
cordial greeting. From that day until his untimely 
death we wore friends. 



VIVID WAR INCIDENT. 



On the morning of May 4. 1865, after the surrender 
of the Army of Tennessee by Gen. Johnston at Greens- 
boro, N. ('., after being paroled I, with a few comrades, 
was at Salisbury, X. ('., and left about 7 o'clock a. M. 
for our homes, all of us going westward, ami all step- 
ping at a lively gait. We were going towards Char- 
lotte, X. C, and traveling parallel with the railroad. 
A few miles out from Salisbury I noticed clots or 
lumps of blood often in the road, and as the road was 
full of men, some walking ami others riding, 1 thought 
it probable that a horse hail been hurt and was bleed- 
ing. But soon 1 saw a man sitting on some railroad 
wood with, as I thought, a red bosomed shirt on, and 
upon getting close to him 1 saw he was red, but with 
his own blood. As I have already said, the road was 
full of men, but no one seemed to give the unfortunate 
man any attention until I got up opposite to him, 
when two men said something to him which 1 did not 
understand, but I heard him say in a very distinct- 
voice. " Xo. there is no use trying to do any thing, for 
I am dying. But you can take that coat," which lay 
six or eight feet from him. "to my wife in Augusta, 
Ga. She is the daughter of Gen. Rains." During his 
talk he put his hand in the gaping wound, which had 
been made, as we supposed, by himself, and got out 
the blood and rubbed all over his arms. And the two 
men turned away from him and moved on, and I did 
so too. He was an officer of some rank, but 1 could 
not tell the rank. His uniform was what we tailed 
English cloth, though considerably worn. He was a 
fine looking man about thirty years of age. 

W. F. Allison. 



134 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS' HOME FOR MISSOURI. 



The great work of erecting the main building oi 
tin Confederate Home of Missouri is nearly completed. 
It is to cost about 824,000, and is to be finished June 1. 
Of this sum 812,000 has been paid to the builder. 
About 82,000 more must be raised by the first day of 
June. As this is the work of the women of Missouri, 
and one of which all may well be proud, the Auxilia- 
ries of the State are urged to prolong the labors until 
this sum is raised, [f possible, they will furnish the 
building complete. This will require the united efforts 
iif all the Auxiliaries for at least another year. 

The main building will be presented to the State 
Association about the first of June, with proper ded- 



M i - K. R. Gamble writes : "This closes the second 
year of my office as Secretary. Though the duties 
have Keen arduous the labor ha- been one of love. 
Accept my best wishes for the future prosperity of 
the Association. I feel confident that a body of ladies 
-i' deeply interested, and possessing the noble spirit 
which animate- the Daughters of the Confederacy, 
will continue the work until the goal is reached. 
Their reward will he. in the words of Him who said, 
' Inasmuch as ye have dune it unto one of the least of 
these, my brethren, ye have dime it unto me.'" 

The officers are : President, Mrs. MA. E. McLure; 
Vice-Presidents, Mrs. C. »'. Rainwater. Mrs. R. W. Par- 
cells, Mrs. John S. Bowen, Mrs. W. N. R. Beall, Mrs. 
J. I'. Richardson, Mrs. II. K. Walker: Treasurer, Mr-. 
\V. I'. Howard; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. I.. M. 
Pickett; Recording Secretary, Mrs. E. R. Gamble. 




A^AA,.-^'' 1 ^^ 



f A 



^ A . - %A, i^^Al'ta^,.,... ^' : - l "A; : AA"A^,. 



CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS' HOME FOR MISSOURI. 



icatory ceremonies. All Auxiliaries are urged to send 
representatives to l\ igginsville to assist in this dedica- 
tion, of which due notice is being given. It is only in 
this way thai they can realize the grand results of 
their united work. A circular reads as follows: 

" It has been a source of gratification that the hon- 
ored President, Mrs. M. A. E. McLure, has been pres- 
ent witli us so frequently during the past year, with 
undiminished zeal, prompted by love of the cause so 
dear to her heart. Her influence has been exerted to 
promote the accomplishment of our work. Possess- 
ing that charity "which thinketh no evil," she has by 
her gentleness and forbearance with our errors and 
faults won the hearts of all who know her. May the 
life which brings so much sunshine to other hearts be 
spared for many years." 



A Pailosophic Darkey.- Some time ago two colored 
hoys, between whom there was a feud, met and began 
to quarrel. One of them became very abusive, and 
called the other a great many hard names. The other 
listened to him until his stock of vitureration was ex- 
hausted, and then he said : " Is you done?" The first 
intimated that he had no more to say. Then here- 
plied: "All detn things you say I is you's clem." 



The Confederate Veteran takes much pleasure 
in publishing that the Southern Express Company, 
through its agency at Nashville, has been unstinted 
in its liberality for the promotion of the Davis mon- 
ument and for the advancement of its own interest. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



i35 



REGENT COMMENTS UPON THE VETERAN. 



None of these notices have appeared before this. 

Chicago Letter in Pine Bluff (Ark.) paper: "The 
Confederate Veteran should be in every Southern 
home." 

Savannah (Ga.) News: "The Veteran is the best 
Southern Confederate journal that has yet been pub- 
lished." 

Gen. John Boyd, Lexington, Ky.: "The Veteran 
is like our Kentucky whisky — improves with age. 
Gen. E. Kirby-Smith's picture is the besl I ever saw 
of him." 

Isaac Garrett, Pembroke, Ky.: "Through Cant. I'- 
ll. Bell I became a subscriber, and like it bo well thai 
I wanted my friends to have it. so I send you my 
check for thirteen subscriptions." 

Col. E. E. Tansil, Dresden, Tenn., with inclosed 
subscription for the Veteran, adds: "Will try and 
send you a good list of subscribers at next meeting of 
our Bivouac. May it live long and prosper." 

The Veteran is sufficient, thinks a man of high 

character: We want but one war journal, and you are 
giving us that. Keep "the fly " out of the ointment, 
and we'll try to keep out rivals, especially "yanks." 

Gen. George Reese, of Pensacola, Fla., after show- 
ing much patience with errors in list of subscribers 
sent by him, adds: "1 hope you will have abundant 
success. The last number is a splendid one, and 

worth the year's subscription." 

Robt. Chisholm, Esq., Birmingham, Ala.: "Your 
Confederate Veteran is the best and cheapest pe- 
riodical 1 have ever seen. 1 only wisli you were in 
Birmingham so that 1 could help you to make for it 
the large-t circulation in this country.'' 

A Republican said to a lady who was of a large 
party of Iowa journalists, when handing her a copy 
of the Confederate Veteran: "I want you to see 

how a Confederate, who was himself a soldier, can 
write all about the war, all on his own side, and not 
say one offensh c word." 

Col. .1. II. Mo,. re. Canton, Ga., May 10: "Our mutual 
friend, Capt. Newman, of this place, and I succeeded, 
without much effort, in procuring tin inclosed list of 
twenty subscribers to the Veteran. All who have 
seen tin Veteran pronounce it first-class and believe 
it will exactly till a long-felt need in the South." 

Thos. 1>. Osborne, Louisville. Secretary Confederate 
Association of Kentucky: "The Confedei m Vet- 
eran for April has just arrived. It cannot he sur- 
passed. 1 hope you will get a good many subscribers 
in Kentucky. At the next meeting of our association 
1 will make a statement about it to the memhers." 

Dr. John Young, with a good list from Springdale, 
Ark., adds: "It is a matter of astonishment to me 
that such enterprises are so rare in the South. By all 
means let the record before, since, and during the 
war — lie truthfully written, and the contrast he drawn, 
that generations yet unhorn may read and judge." 

John T. Moore, Henderson, Ky. : "We have a Con- 
federate Association here of about sixty memhers. 
with Maj. M. M. Kimmel (Chief of Staff with Gen. 
Van Dorn) as Commander and (apt. R. 11. Cunning- 
ham, who was Adjutant of Gen. McCausland's Brigade, 
Virginia Infantry. Our memhers represent eight dif- 
ferent States." He sends eight subscribers. 



Judge Pitkin C. Wright, Secretary Tennessee Press 
Association, Memphis. Tenn.. May 6: "1 am delighted 
to welcome the Confederate Veteran and its Cun- 
ningham to the fold. * * * I have had hut time 
to glance it over, hut have seen enough to know that 
it is worthy of you and of the old veterans. What 
more could he said of it'.'" 

('has. F. Belser, President the Pythian Period, Nash- 
ville, April 27 : :;; * * "1 must beg your pardon, 
however, lor delaying until this day the remittance of 
i he exceedingly small subscription price. This I now 
hand you. As an offset of my negligence, I herewith 
otfer the following names as yearly subscribers, and 
hand you herewith $2.50." 

A zealous patron in Texas, w ho works diligently for 
the Yin RAN and accepts no discount, begins a recent 
as follows : " As the ocean is composed of little 
drop- of water, ami the shore of little grains of sand, 
so must the Kk),(kki subscribers to the Veteran he 
composed of individuals, and I hope your subscription 
may reach the 100,000 before L894." 

( ol. \\ \. Campbell, Columbus, Miss.: "Send me 
copies of April number. I will circulate them and 
try and get you a club from tins place, among the 
members of our camp. I do not understand why 
every soldier of the war should not take it, as it is 
very interesting to all old soldiers specially. I would 
like to se< j our list go to a hundred thousand." 

Phil. Samuel. Richmond, Va., May 1 .": "I Baw yes- 
terday a copy of the CONFEDERATE VETERAN, and was 
so much pleased with it that I determined to sub- 
scribe for it at once. I am the janitor of I!. E. I ee 
Camp. No. I, Confederate Veterans, and an 'old Vir- 
ginian.' and take the greatest interest in anything 
that stirs my memory about those glorious, though 
sad. days, and your paper was so full of such mem- 
ories that I am determined to do what little 1 can to 
ase its circulation. 1 -hall send you all the sub- 
scribers I 

The Na8hvill A ' The CONFEDERATI VET- 

ERAN for April is being mailed to subscribers, with its 
remarkably large subscription list, age of the publica- 
tion considered, as a supplemi nl Its title page con- 
tain- a tine half-tone picture of Gen. E. Kirby-Smith 
and the 'Conquered Banner,' by Father Ryan, with 
the Confederate battle flag in colors. Of the other il- 
lustrations the monument in Hollywood Cemetery. 
Richmond, where Mr. Davis is to' be buried next 
month, is excellent, as is also a family picture of the 
Kirby-Smiths, with a dozen faces in it. Mr Cunning- 
ham's thrilling experience in the battle of Franklin, 
a Story which has attracted much attention and caused 
historians to visit the field of carnage and elaborate 
hi- data, is republished. 'The Rebel Veil' is repro- 
duced from the January issue, as is also the sketch of 
Jefferson Davis and his picture at eighty years. The 
subscription list, which nearly fills four seven column 
pages of the American, attests the popularity of the 
publication, and it exhibits an enthusiasm which is 
beyond precedent. The projector of the enterprise 
could well afford to publish it, with the scores of let- 
ters in its praise by representative Southern people. 
Vivid reminiscences from the siege of Jackson, Miss., 
by the editor, follows an editorial which emphasizes 
the spirit of the publication. This issue clearly ex- 
cells all the preceding issues, and is not only a credit 
to Nashville, but to the journalism of the country." 



136 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



Newman Brandon, Tobacco Port, Tenn.: ■• I read 
the Confederate Veteran with much interest and 
pleasure. I was in my cradle when the greatest of 
modern dramas was being enacted, and the Southern 
soldiers were winning for themselves immortal glory. 
The magazine will 'I- a great deal of good towards 
presenting a true history of the war. 1 send von two 
subscribers." 

Courier Journal: "The editor, S. A.Cunningham, is 
a well-equipped newspaper man. Hi- description of 
the battle or Franklin has not been surpassed. Sev- 
eral hundred subscriptions have been sent out from 
Kentucky, and it is probable that there will be a 
thousand or more. It is the most attractive magazine 
of the Confederate history, and will win its place 
everywhere." 

Col. A. Fulkerson, in sending three subscriptions, 
April 12: "I am greatly pleased with your periodical, 
and hope you will make it a success. 1 am sure it 
deserves the hearty support of every Confederate sol- 
dier, and I will endeavor to secure other subscriptions, 
and lose no opportunity to bring the Veteran to the 
attention of all old comrades in Tennessee and Vir- 
ginia within my reach." 

I "1. S. A. Champion, Nashville. Tenn.: " I received 
a letter from my little niece in Missouri, to whom 1 
had sent a copy of your valuable journal, and in the 
letter she inclosed a dollar, saying: 'I have gotten you 
two subscribers for the Confederate Veteran, and 
will get more.' I have taken so much interest in the 
Confederate Veteran, mainly on your account, that 
you see Miss Kva thinks it belongs to me." 

Master George Wilson, Rutherford, Gibson County. 
Tenn.: "I received the April number of the Confed- 
erate Veteran, and read it with much interest. 1 
am only a hoy. hut I feel by reading the Confederate 
VETERAN that I shall learn the true history of the 
boys in gray, something that can't be found in the 
common school history. I send you the following 
list. I would canvass for your valuable paper if 1 
had time, hut school is keeping me busy." 

Adjt. .1. Thos. Dunn, Portsmouth, Va., March 22, 
1893: "The Committee of Arrangements of Stonewall 
Camp decided to change the time of memorial and 
dedication of monument. In compliance with the 
wishes of the Grand Commander, the Grand Camp 
will convene on the 1 1th of June. The memorial 
and decoration will take place the following day. the 
loth of June. Col. R. C. Marshall, who is now Com- 
mander of Stonewall Camp, will deliver the oration, 
and Rev. B. 1>. Tucker, of Norfolk, will read a poem." 

Ceo. W. R. Bell, Cedar Springs, Cherokee County, 
Ala.: " We have in our county an organization known 
as the Cherokee County Confederate Veteran Associa- 
tion. We belong to the State Association and have 
elected delegates to attend the meeting in Birming- 
ham in July. It does seem to me that every true 
Confederate Veteran ought to take it from a personal, 
if not a patriotic, consideration. I can say for myself 
that I am not only pleased, hut delighted, with its 
high moral tone and conservative, patriotic sentiment." 

Manly 1!. Curry. Louisville, Ky.: "Through the so- 
licitation of Mrs. 1'. P. H. I became a subscriber to 
the Confederate Veteran. I take a number of pa- 
pers, and when this one came I paid no attention to 
it, hut happening to accidentally catch sight of your 
name, my curiosity was aroused, and I looked through 



the number. 1 fei 



iaid for having done so. 1 -hall 



t tic number, i teei repaid tor navingaone so. t -hail 
not only look forward to the coming of the paper in 
the future, hut am interested in its welfare. * 
I am a sou of Dr. J. I.. M. Curry, of Richmond, Va. 
As one of the younger generation who has grown to 

manh I since the war. I want to make a suggestion : 

< fur fathers, mothers, and big brothers were old enough 
to appreciate what was going on. and we love to hear 
them tell of their personal experiences, but they are 

now rapidly pa-<iic_ r into old age and will s i he on 

the other side of the dark river. If you can get some 
of them to write you letters giving their personal ex- 
periences you will preserve in a permanent form ex- 
ceedingly valuable information. Generals, literary 
people, and historians tell us of battles, hut the an- 
nals of the privates, the sufferings of the women, and 
the make-shifts w hich they resorted to to Supply the 
necessities of life, exist only in the memories of a 
rapidly decreasing few. A letter by Mrs. Jefferson 
1'avis. recently published in' the Sunday papers, is 
somewhat in the line of what 1 mean. 1 don't think 
that you can have too much of this sort of material. 
Another thing, our opponents have published tons of 
literature giving the dark side of slavery. We have 
little telling of its bright side. Although 1 was born 
during slavery times and was old enough before its 
abolishment to appreciate its existence, 1 have seen so 
much against it that the very idea of it is abhorrent 
to me. I have read so much of the dark side that I 
wonder how those whom I love so clearly could have 
upheld such an institution. If I am so influenced, 
what must be the feelings of my children when they 
grow 11(1? Let each issue of your paper contain some- 
thing telling of the bright side, of the com shuckings, 
the quiltings, the barbecues, the big meetings, the 
weddings' etc., showing that the slaves enjoyed life 
and were 1 not eternally skulking in dark comers 
dodging the whip of the brutal overseer, or quaking 
with terror at the bay of a blood hound. You advo- 
cate the building of monuments to our heroes. 1 tell 
you that unless something is done at once, ami done 
persistently, to counteract the influence and misrep- 
resentation of ' Uncle Tom's Cabin ' and the like, our 
children will look upon those whose memory those 
monuments are intended to perpetuate as objects of 
pity, if not of contempt. For the past eight years 1 
have been living in St. Paul, Minn. I have talked 
with children there on the subject of slavery, ami the 
poison is doing its work, and doing it effectually. 
Even at this day a man who owned slaves is looked 
upon as little, if any better, than a slave trader, a 
pirate, or a brigand, who held prisoners for a ransom. 
1 am not talking theory, but actual experience. As 
soon as those who were the actual owners of slaves 
have died out in the South this feeling will gradually 
work its way into our own country. For (bid's sake 
do something to prevent the great names of our an- 
cestors being the theme for a jest and the subject for 
taunts. Please pardon this long letter and tirade, but 
1 feel deeply mi this subject. I think something 
should be done to counteract the growing sentiment. 
I believe that the Confederate Veteran is the me- 
dium through which it can be done." 



Comrades can get the regulation Confederate Battle Flag 
Badge, enameled in colors, to be worn in buttonhole of coat 
lapel, by sending their order, with 50 cents, to Capt. E. W. 
Averell, Jeweler, 215J I'nion Street, Nashville, Tenn. 

See his regular advertisement in this issue. 






CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



i37 



ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS' PRISON LIFE. 



A complete history of " The war between the States" 
will never be printed. Occasionally, after a lapse of 
several decades, new chapters will appear, seeming 
incredible, because the vigilant journalist has not 
" handed it in " sooner. 

These reflections are given as introductory to a few 
chapters, it becomes my fortune to possess, concerning 
the surrender and imprisonment of the Confederate 
Vice-President. .Many items will appear of general 
interest, and altogether it will be interesting to those 
who most admired the extraordinary statesman. 
Strange as it may seem a dismal blank occurred in a 
Southern record of events just at this period. 

Mr. Stephens' own language is used except where 
there are necessary abbreviations, and then the sub- 
stance is given with the least change possible. 

Fort Warren, neab Boston, M iss., 
■J 7 May. 1865. 

This book was purchased this ,iay of A. .1. Hall. 
Sutler at this Post, by Alexander H. Stephens, a 
prisoner on the Fort, with a view of preserving in it 
some regular record of the incidents of his imprison- 
ment and prison life. It may he interesting to him- 
self hereafter, sometimes, should he be permitted to 
live, to refer to it — ami if his own life should not lie 
spared it may he of interest, in like manner, to some 
one of his relatives and friends. 

He knows it will l.e of intense Interest to his dear 
and only brother, Hon. Linton Stephens, of Sparta, 
(ia. Besides, lie feels sure that all his relatives will he 
exceedingly glad to peruse it : especially in the event 
that the\ never see him again. For these reasons the 
book has been purchased. 

HIS ARREST AT LIBERTY HALL. 

Thursday. 11th May. 1865, This was a most beauti- 
ful and charming morning. After a refreshing sleep 
I rose early. Robert Hull, a youth of about 16 years 
of age. son of Henry Hull, Jr., of Athens, (ia . spent 
the night before with me. After writing some letters 
for the mail, my custom being to attend to such busi- 
ness as simii as breakfast was over. Robert and I were 
amusing ourselves at a game ofcassino, when Tim 
came running in the parlor where we were, saying, 
'' Master, more Yankees have come: a whole heap of 
them are in town galloping all about with guns." 

Suspecting what it meant. 1 rose, told Robert I ex- 
pected they had come for me, and entered my bed- 
room to make arrangements for leaving if my appre- 
hensions should prove correct. Soon [ saw an officer 
with soldiers under arms approaching the house. The 
doors were all open, I met the officer in the library. 
He asked if my name was Stephens? 1 told him it 
was. "Alexander H. Stephens'.'" said he. 1 told him 
that was my name. He said he had orders to arrest 
me and put me in custody. I asked him his name, 
and to let me see his orders. He replied, his name 
was ('apt. Saint, of the 1th Iowa Cavalry, or mounted 
infantry. He was then under (Jen. Upton. He showed 
me the order. It was by Gen. Upton at Atlanta for 
my arrest, and that of Robert Toombs. Xo charge 
was specified. He was directed to go to Crawfordville 
and arrest inc. and then proceed to Washington and 
arrest Mr. Toombs, and to carry both to General 
Upton's headquarters. I told Capt. Saint that I had 
been looking for something of this kind, at least had 
thought it not improbable for some weeks, and hence 



had not left home. Gen. Upton need not have sent 
any force for me. Had he simply notified me that he 
wished me at his headquarters I should have gone. 

I asked the Captain if 1 would be permitted to carry 
any clothing with me, and how long I would be 
allowed to pack up. He said a few minutes — as long 
as would be necessary. He said, "You may take a 
servant with you, if you wish." 1 asked him if he 
knew my destination. He said, first to Atlanta, and 
then to Washington City. I called in Anthony, a 
black hoy from Richmond, who had been waiting on 
me for several years, and asked him if he wished to 
go. and that 1 would send him to his mother in Rich- 
mond from Washington. He was willing to go, and 
was soon ready. It was about R 1 o'clock \. \i. when 
('apt. Saint came to my house In about fifteen min- 
utes not much over — we -tailed for the depot. 
Friends and servants followed, most of them crying. 
My own heart was full -too full, however, tor tears. 
While Anthony was getting ready 1 asked Capt. Saint 
if I could write a note or two to some friends. He said 
1 could. 1 wrote my brother in about these word-: 

Crawfordville, Ga., 11th May. 1865. 
Dead Brother—] havejustl a arrested by Capt. 

Saint, of the Fourth Iowa Cavalry. Theorderemb 
Gen. Toombs. We are both to he carried to Atlanta, 
and thence to Washington City, it seems. When 1 
shall see you again, if ever, I do not know. May Cod 
enable you to he as well prepared for whatever fate 
may await me as I trust he will enable me to bear it. 
May his blessings ever attend you ami yours. 1 have 
not time to gay more. A kis- and my tenderest love 
t" \ our dear little one-, Yours most affectionately, 

At EXANDEB H. STI I III NS. 

This letter 1 scaled and addressed to him, and told 
Harry to send it over to Sparta immediately after I 
should have. The Captain said he preferred I should 
mH -end tin note then, that we would come hack. 
and alter that 1 might send it. 1 told him it was a 
note simply announcing my arrest and destination. 
1 told him he might read it. I opened it and handed 
it to him. He still objected, and I tore the note up. 
At the cars a great many people had assi mbled. All 
seemed deeply oppressed and grieved. Many wept 
bitterly. To me the parting was exceedingly sad and 
sorrowful. When we left the depot the train backed 
up several hundred yards, where several soldiers, that 
seemed to have been put out there as scouts, got on. 
There was no stop until we reached Rarnctt. There 
we took another engine and started to Washington. 
About four miles from the town the train stopped at 
a shanty occupied by a supervisor of the track. Here 
I was put off, with about twenty soldiers to guard me. 
The Captain and the others went on to Washington, 
lb-aid he expected to he back in an hour. He did 
not come until after dark. In the meantime there 
came up a cloud and a heavy fall of rain. The man 
of the house gave me dinner, fried meat and corn 
bread, the best he had. I was not at all hungry — in- 
deed, had no ap] ict it e. hut I ate to show my gratitude for 
his hospitality — share his homely but substantia] fare. 

Soon after dark the returning engine was heard com- 
ing. I was intensely anxious to know what had been 
the cause of detention. When what we supposed was 
the returning train came up it was nothing but the 
engine. The Captain had returned to bring his men 
some commissary stores and went back immediately. 
I asked him what was the cause of detention — what 



138 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



had occurred— if Gen. 'Toombs was at home? He 
answered evasively and left me in doubt and great 
perplexity. About 9 o'clock the train came. The 
ground was saturated with water, and I got my feet 
partially wet — damp; this, together with the chilliness 
of the night, after the rain, gave me a sore throat, at- 
tended with Bevere hoarseness. When the train was 
under way for Barnett, 1 asked the Captain if he had 
Mr. Toombs. "No," he said, "Mr. Toombs Banked 
us." This was said in a rather disappointed, irate 
tone, and I made no further inquiries. About 11 
o'clock we took the night schedule up train at Harnett 
for Atlanta. It was cool and clear; some panes of 
glass were broken out of the windows of the cars, and 
I was quite i hilled by the exposure. This was one of 
the most eventful days of my life. Never before was 
1 under arrest, or deprived of my liberty. 

12th May.— Reached Atlanta about half past 8 
o'clock a. m. Morning clear and cool — quite unwell — 
earried to Gen. Upton's headquarters. He had gone 
to Macon, but was expected hack that night, (apt. 
Gilpin, on Gen. Upton's staff, received me and assigned 
me a room. Anthony made a fire, and Cant. Gilpin 
ordered breakfast. Walked ahout the city under 
guard. The desolation and havoc of war in this city 
were heartrending. Several persons called to see me. 
Gen. Ira R. Foster called, lie was allowed to address 
me a note, and I was allowed to answer it, but no 
interview was permitted. Col. (!. W. Lee called. He 
was permitted to see me, to speak to me, but not per- 
mitted to have any conversation. John W. Duncan 
was permitted to visit my room and remain as long 
as he pleased. The same permission was extended to 
Gip. drier. Grier and Duncan called several times 
during the day. Capt. Saint called and said he would 
send the surgeon of the regiment to prescribe for my 
hoarseness. The surgeon came and prescribed reme- 
dies that did me good. Maj. Cooper called and gave 
me a bottle of whisk}'. I started from home with 
about $590 in gold, which I had laid up for a long 
time for Buch a contingency. Gip. Grier offered me 
$100 additional in gold if 1 wished it. I declined it. 
John W. Duncan offered any amount I might want. 
Gen. Foster, in his note, also offered me any assistance 
in the way of funds I might need. 

13th May. — Did not sleep well last night. Gen. 
Upton called in my room early. 1 was so hoarse I 
could hardly talk. He informed me he had removed 
all guards ; that 1 was on my parole. J told him I 
should not violate it. He seemed very courteous and 
agreeable. I learned from him that, .Mr. Davis had 
been captured. That Mr. C. C. Clay had surrenderee! 
himself. That Mr. Davis and party, with Mr. and 
Mrs. Clay, would be in Atlanta to-night on their way 
to Washington also. Said he would send me in a 
special train to-night to Augusta, but from thereto 
Savannah I should have to go in the same boat with 
Mr. Davis and party. I had frequent talks with Gen. 
Upton during t he day, and was well pleased with him. 
Several friends ('ailed again to-day, Maj. Cooper, 
Duncan, Gip.Grierand others, several times. Duncan 
gave me a bottle of Scotch ale. which 1 put in my 
trunk. He also gave me the name of a hanking house 
in Europe, with which he had funds, and authorized 
me to draw on it for any I might need. 

This evening a Col. Peters came to renew his 
acquaintance with me. We talked pleasantly and 
agreeably of past events and associations. 



BEMINISi EN( I - "I OTHER DAYS. 

From my window, just before night 1 took a bird's- 
eye survey of the ruins of this place. I saw where the 
Trout House Btood — where Douglas -poke iii I860. 
Thought of the seem- of that day- the deep forebod- 
ings 1 then had of all of these troubles, and how sorely 
oppressed 1 was. at least, in their contemplation. Not 
much less so than 1 now am in their full realization 
and myself amongst the victims. How strange it 
seems to me that I should thus sutler. /. who did 
everything in the power of man to prevent them. 
God's providence is mysterious, and I bow submis- 
sively to his will. In my survey 1 could but rest the 
eye for a time upon the ruins of the Atlanta Hotel, 
while the mind was crowded with associations brought 
to life in gazing upon it. There is where, on the 1th 
September. IMS, for resenting the charge for being a 
traitor to the South I was near losing my life. And 
now 1 am a prisoner under charge, 1 suppose, of being 
a traitor to the Union. In all I am now I have done 
nothing but what I thought was right. In my whole 
life — public life as well as private — 1 have been gov- 
erned by a sense of duty. I have endeavored in every- 
thing to do what was right under the circumstances 
•surrounding me. The result be what it may, I shal' 
endeavor to meet and bear with resignation. 

At '.) o'clock p. m. Gen. Upton informed me that my 
train would start at 11 o'clock; that I might stop at 
home and get breakfast and take more clothing if I 
wished. The train that would carry Mr. Davis and 
party would leave two hours later, and I could remain 
until it reached Crawford ville. * * * I told Gen. 
Upton that there was another colored boy at my house, 
Henry, a brother of Anthony, whose mother was in 
Richmond. I should like, if there was no objection, 
to take him along with me to Fortress Monroe, whence 
I could send him to his home. He consented. 

.Sunday, 14th May. — This is ever a memorable day 
to me. It is the anniversary of my step-mothers 
death. It is the day on which was severed the last tie 
that kept the old family circle together around the 
hearthstone at the old homestead. My father died 
just one week before, on the 7th. This was in 1826. 
At half past 11 this morning the cars reached the 
depot at Crawfordville. My coming was known, and 
a large crowd was at the depot to see me. I hastened 
to my house, as I had much to do. Church was just 
out. preaching over and the congregation leaving. I 
could but give a hearty shake of the hand to many 
whose eyes were filled with tears. Nearly all my ser- 
vants from the homotead were at church. I learned 
that John had been over to Sparta and informed my 
brother Linton of my arrest. Also that he was sick. 
Oh ! what a pang that intelligence struck to my heart. 
In a hurried manner I had a repacking of clothes. 
Henry and Anthony were soon ready. 

Such hurried directions as could be were given to 
the servants on the lot and at the homestead. The 
leavestaking were hurried and confused. The servants 
all wept. My grief at leaving them and home was too 
burning, withering, scorching for tears. At the depot 
there was an immense crowd — old friends, black and 
white. They came in great numbers and sbook bands. 
That parting and that scene I can never forget. It 
almost crazes the brain to think of it. 1 could not 
stand it until the other train arrived, but told the 
Captain to move off. This he did. When we arrived 
at Barnett we waited for the other train. Gen. Upton 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



*39 



came in to see me, and suggested that I would be 
more comfortable in the car he had on the other train. 
In a short time we were under way again. Reached 
Augusta some time before sundown. Gen. Upton had 
a carriage for me to ride in to the boat, which was four 
or five miles from the city, down the river. After the 
other train came up. which was half an hour behind 
us, Mr. and Mrs. Davis were put in a special carriage, 
some officer with them, Mr. (lay and Mrs. Clay in a 
separate carriage by themselves. Then, as our car- 
riages passed each other, I tor the firsl time saw them. 
They both bowed to me ami I to them. Mr. Davis 
did not sec i.,c until we reached the boat. A major 
from Indiana rode in the carriage with me. Mrs. 
Davis' white nurse came and asked to ride in our car- 
riage. We let her in. She had Mrs. Davis' infant in 
her arms. Guards were in front, on the side and . in 
the rear — some mounted on horses, some in wagons — 
all well armed. After the carriages stalled, which 
looked much like a funeral procession, and we had 
got away from the depot, we found the streets lined 
on both sides with immense crowds of people. 1 
recognized but one familiar face in the whole passage 
through the city, and that was Moon-, of the < 'h 
mill Sentinel, although I bowed to several who bowed 
to me. All that 1 saw looked sad and depressed. 
When we reached the landing it was a long time before 
we got on the boat. The walk to the river's edge was 
rough. Deep ravines, without bridges, had to be 
crossed, and it was with great difficulty, even with 
assistance thai 1 was enabled to get along. 

The boat was a miserable affair to bear the name of 
steamboat. It was a river tug without cabin. There 
were a few berths which the ladies occupied. All the 
vest of us were put on deck except Mr. Davis. He 
stayed in the pari of the boat occupied by the ladies. 
There was a covering over us. but the sides were open. 
Gen. Wheeler and lour of his men we found on the boat. 
[To be Continued."] 

Monument at Athens, Ga. — Athens. Ga., hasa very 

interesting monument, located in the center of an im- 
portant thoroughfare. It cost S4,4-I4, and tin- funds 
were raised through the zeal of Athens women. To 
the I 'resident. Mis. James Rutherford, is due the honor 
of a handsomer monument than would otherwise 
have been erected. Misses Pauline Thomas, Bessie 
Midi and Mrs. Lizzie Minor are remembered as zealous 
workers. 

Mrs. Rutherford, mentioned above, was a remark- 
able woman. She was sister of Gens. T. R. R. Cobb 
and Howell Cobb, two names that will forever be a 
pari of the history of our Empire State. While the 
struggle for independence was in progress she took up 
every carpet in her house but one and made them into 
blankets for soldiers, and she openly declared her will- 
ingness to go into the light. Her personal courage 
was illustrated in a memorable event near the close of 
the war: The Federals had pulled down the fence to 
a little field of young corn just hack of her garden 
and turned a multitude of mules in it. She called a 
negro man. ordered him to drive them out and put 
up the fence, but he said, "No. Mistis. dciu Yankees 
would kill me." "No," she said with emphasis, "I'll 
go with you, and they will not resent us." Sure enough 
the soldiers stood astounded upon seeing the lady and 
the negro clear the held, and when the negro had put 
up thi' fence they gave three cheers. Moreover, they 
never disturbed her premises again. 



PRESENTATION OF FLAG IN MAY, 1861. 



Miss Lillian T.Rozell, now Lillian Roz.ell-Mossonger, 
the authoress, presented a Hag to Gen. Pat Cleburne's 
command near Line Bluff, May 17, 1861. She said : 

Our beloved countrymen, we greet you to-day to 

present your brave band with this banner, made by 
the ladies of Line Bluff — those dear to your hearts 
and firesides. * 

You go, brave ones, to struggle in the dearest cause 
.in American heart has at stake — the rights of this 
hallowed land of the South. Remember, it was lib- 
erty, not union, for which our forefathers fought. Now 
that your own cherished State has bared her bosom to 
breast the storm, struggle for her: retain her a bright 
constellation in that great galaxy of Southern States. 

This banner we consign to your care with prayers 
and tears, sent up to Heaven's throne in your behalf 

by those who daily cry, "Cur hearts are with you." 
(The (lag's motto. i Accept our farewell and last in- 
junction : 

oli. shield the bright South, this beautiful land, 
Sacred and dear to your own loyal hand. 
Her winds sang your cradle-hymns gently and low. 
And tuned were your hearts to her brooklets' soft flow. 

And now that the foe, with despotic sway, 
Seeks to tear all her wealth and glory away, 
Nerve your strong hearts, to the rescue go on, 
'Till silenced the storm, and bright battles won! 

There, too, the heart of true woman will go 

To smile in your joy and soothe in your woe: 

When laurels the brightest your brows shall entwine, 

Her soul-hymns for you shall witi hingly chime. 

Then on, brave ones, ever on in the right, 

God, your defender, will save you from blight. 

After the close of this address the officers of the regi- 
ment had a Balute of nine guns fired in honor of Miss 
Rozell. A stand had been purposely erected from 
which the address was given. About this the entire 
battalion was drawn to participate in the ceremonies. 
The "Jefferson Guards" being a part of this body, the 
flag was presented to Gen. Cleburne for his regiment. 
He made an enthusiastic address in reply to Miss 
Rozell, as he stood up in a plain split-bottom chair in 
frontof the stand. The motto of the Hag, "Our hearts 
are with you," was chos< u by Miss Rozell. 

lb: Deserves His Sword. — W. A. Campbell, Colum- 
bus, Miss., March 27, 1893: "Mr. A. .1. Story, of the 
Eleventh Alabama Volunteers, says thai in the battle 

Of the Crater, near Petersburg, he captured a Federal 
lieutenant-colonel with a wooden leg, and that broken. 
He asked him when he lost his leg, and learned that 
it was at the tirst battle of Manassas. He gave Mr. 
Story his sword ami pistol, and he left his sword with 
a Miss Belle Peay, of Richmond, Va. lie offered the 
pistol to this lady, but she said she would keep the 
sword for him. He now says if this colonel is still 
living and would like to get his sword l if Miss Belle 
Peay is living), he might get it by writing to Rich- 
mond." 

Wanted. — To buy. immediately, Confederate Money, Con- 
federate stamps on original envelopes, old 1". S. Stamps older 
than 1872, and old Coins. Describe exactly what yon have 
got, and address, Edward S. Jones, Garland Avenue, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. (11) 



140 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



AN INCIDENT OF WAR TIMES. 



In Florida May is quite a warm month. Open doors 
invite the perfume-laden breeze, the sky, the air, the 
birds, the Bowers. All nature is joyous, bouyant, riot- 
ous in happiness without that undertone of langour, 
and even melancholy, which comes later a- the season 
advances. The May in question was the memorable 
May of 1865. Not many gave a thought to the charms 
of nature as every ear strained, every nerve throbbed, 
every heart ached to hear' the news from Virginia. All 
felt that the cause was lost, hut the feeling was not put 
into words, except in the sacredness of the most con- 
fidential friendship. The air was full of rumors of 
defeat-, victories, terms of peace, unconditional sur- 
render, European interference, etc. Everywhere the 
unsettled state of the country provoked deeds of law- 
1' --in ss, hut most hideous of all were the accounts of 
negro outrages, theft, murder, arson, .and hlaeker crimes. 

You sweet and gentle women who dwell now in 
sheltered homes enjoying the security of a native land 
at peace, whose fathers, brothers, busbands and sons 
come and go regularly, or if detained inform you by 
telephone or telegraph, or the slower but very sure, 
iffice service, of the changed programme, do you 
not wonder how we lived through those sorrowful 
years of war, especially through those last solemn days 
when all regular transportation was discontinued, the 
mails stopped, all official news cut off? Almighty 
God himself, who feeds the springs of life and hope, 
alone knows how we were supported. The negroes 
were as restless as the white people. A wonderful 
e was coming. Of that they felt certain, but 
what to do to reap its henefits they did not know. As 
a rule the negroes were astonishingly obedient. Hav- 
ing but little knowledge of the world beyond their 
own neighborhoods, the change was anticipated with 
mingled feelings of awe and delight. Their deliverers 
were coming, they could afford to be still and wait for 
"the sal vat ion of the Lord;'' at least that seemed to be the 
temper of all the slaves on the plantation where I awaited 
the ntum of my husband from the Army of Virginia. 

A- the days swept by anxiety grew more intense. 
We undertook the most hazardous journeys, on foot 
or horseback, to see or hear from somebody who had 
returned from the seat of war. (letting home at dusk 
after one of these profitless jaunts, 1 delayed only long 
enough to tell my friends the result, and that I was 
too tired to take supper, I went to my room. It was 
up stairs, a very Large, square room, with wide win- 
dows 011 three sides and a door on the other side open- 
ing into the hall, just at the head of the stair-steps. 
The large, old-fashioned bedstead stood in the center, 
to catch every breeze and to avoid contact with the 
walls, thereby securing immunity from insects which 
had riotous lives in the land of tin' orange. A full 
moon floated in the dappled sky, under the clouds one 
moment, luminous, clear, brilliant the next. Fatigue, 
suspense, helplessness, the enervating influences of the 
nighl broke down all thoughts of self-control. I threw 
myself on the lied ami sobbed my strength, if not my 
life, away. I heard the shutters carefully closed down 
stairs, the doors locked and heavily barred. Over 
among the negro cabins silence and darkness reigned 
supreme. The 1 big "white folks' house" shone in the 
moonlight. The quarters were low cabins, shaded by 
live oaks and magnolias. One ignorant of their proxim- 
ity would never have suspected it. so entirely were they 
concealed by the abundant foliage in which they nestled. 



"Ah! there is the shallow." I thought, finally recog- 
nizing the necessity of going to bed. ''the shadow in 
this lair landscape, the shadow on our horizon, no 
matter how the conflict ends. Hut why magnify my 
personal sorrows while a whole nation weep,-'.' This 
night is like many of its predecessors, and will pass 
probably as they have done. Confusion there will be, 
but in the end intelligence rules everywhere, and mi it 
will in Dixie.'' 

How inviting the wide, white bed! I was glad not 

tol bliged to shut out the air and the moonlight. 

as being up stairs it was not necessary to close either 

the window shutters or the d \ How long 1 slept 1 

did not know-, but 1 suddenly became conscious that 
I was awake and the room totally dark. The moon 
had gone down, I thought, as 1 raised upon my elbow. 
What sound was that? Deep, regular breathing, such 
a- could proceed only from healthy human lungs. 
One moment more made me certain that the human 
being was under the lied. My mind was in a wild 
turmoil. Should I scream the sound would arouse 
the sleeper, who must have entered the house for some 
nefarious purpose and been overtaken by sleep. Should 
1 attempt to spring past him would 1 reach the door 
first? Was he alone or were others outside? Was it 
particular mischief directed to me or was it general 
disaster threatening the whole family? 1 was not 
aware of coming to any conclusion concerning these 
momentous propositions, but in less time than it takes 
to tell about it I found myself Hying down the steps 
screaming as never woman screamed before, all listen- 
ers, white and black, testified. The family were aroused 
instantly. The master of the house seized one pistol, 
his wife took the other, the children carried brooms. 
sticks, any available weapon of offense or defense. 
From the quarters rushed faithful Csesar, the carriage 
driver, with a big flaming light-wood torch, the regu- 
lar slogan of a Florida darkey, followed by a fright- 
ened crowd of all ages and both sexes. Screams, ex- 
clamations, questions, created a perfect Bedlam. 

"I'll go fust, Mars Joe," said Ca;sar. "Let me fling 
de light o' dis torch on him, dat '11 wake him. Ef he 
move tli'ii you shoot. An' you, Miss Lizzie, git out on 
de gal'ry, pint your pistol towards de yard, ef he jump 
over de bannisters den you shoot." These prelimina- 
ries being arranged Ctesar, the self-elected captain, 
marched valiantly forward.. his master, with his pistol 
cocked, a little in front. The dismayed crowd of 
youngsters stopped in the hall below and on the turn 
of the steps, only a few bold field hands kept (dose to 
Mars Joe and Csesar. The stillness of awe fell upon 
us, expectation was on tiptoe; every moment we 
thought to hear the loud report of the pistol, followed 
by the death wail of some miserable wretch, but in- 
stead camea loud guffaw from Csesar, and a "well, is 
that all?" from his master. Csesar was not long in 
securing the trespasser, who proved to be none other 
than a picaninny not yet attained to the dignity of 
two garments, whose mammy had forgotten to count her 
brood at supper or bed time. He had climbed the steps 
and gone to Sleep without attracting anyone's attention'. 

His adventure was very quietly begun, hut it ended 
in shrieks and screams very natural as he received on 
his thinly clad person a fusillade of blows from his 
irate mammy, who was quite full enough of human 
nature to practice the long-used art of abusing another 
to detract attention from her own carelessness. 

M. M. 

Monteagle, Tenn., May 1, 1893. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



141 



UNITED CONFEDERATE VETERANS. 



The first article of the constitution of the associ- 
ation declares : " The object and purpose of this organ- 
ization will be strictly social, literary, historical, and 
benevolent. It will endeavor to unite in a general 
federation all associations of the < Confederate veterans, 
soldiers and sailors, now in existence or hereafter to 
be formed; to gather authentic data for an impartial 
history of the war between the States ; to preserve the 
relics or mementoes of the same; to cherish the ties 
of friendship that exist among the men who have 
shared common dangers, common suffering, and pri 
vations; to care lor the disabled and extend a helping 
hand to the needy; to protect the widow ami orphan 
and to make ami preserve the record of the services of 
every member, and as far as possible of those of our 
comrades who have preceded us in eternity." 

The last article provides that neither discussion of 
political or religious subjects, nor any political action, 
shall lie permitted in the organization, and anj asso- 
ciation violating that provision shall forfeit its mem- 
bership. 

Gen. .1. B. Gordon, the Commander of the Veterans, 

in an address to the soldiers and sailors: 

"Comrades, no argument is needed to secure for 
those objects your enthusiastic indorsement. They 
have burdened your thoughts for many years; you 
have cherished them in sorrow, poverty, and humil- 
iation. In the face of misconstruction you have held 
them in your hearts with the strength of religious 
convictions. No misjudgments can defeat your 
peaceful purposes lor the future. Your aspirations 
have been lifted by the mere force and urgency of 
surrounding conditions to a plane far above the paltry 
consideration of partisan triumphs. The honoi oi 
the American government, the just powers of the 
Federal government, the equal rights of States, the 
integrity of the Constitutional Union, the sanctions 
of law and the enforcement of order have no class of 
defenders more true and devoted than the ex-soldiers 
of the South and their worthy descendants. Hut you 
realize the great truth that a people without the mem- 
ories of heroic suffering or sacrifice are a people with- 
out a history. 

" To cherish such memories and recall such a past, 
whether crowned with success or consecrated in defeat, 

is to idealize principle and strengthen character, in- 
tensify love of country, and convert defeat ami disas- 
ter into pillars of support for future manhood and no- 
ble womanhood. Whether the Southern people, under 
their chanced conditions, may ever hope to witness 
another civilization which shall equal that which be- 
gan with their Washington and ended with their Lee, 
it is certainly true 1 that devotion to their glorious past 
is not only the surest guarantee of future progress and 
the holiest bond of unity, but is also the strongest 
claim they can present to the confidence and respect 
of the other sections of the Union. 

"In conclusion, I beg to repeat, in substance at 
least, a few thoughts recently expressed by me to the 
State organization, which apply with equal force to 
this general brotherhood. 



" It is political in no sense, except so far as the word 
'political ' is a synonym of the word 'patriotic' It is 
a brotherhood over which the genius of philanthropy 
and patriotism, of truth and of justice, will preside; 
of philanthropy, because it will 'succor the disabled, 
help the needy. Strengthen the weak, and cheer the 
disconsolate: of patriotism, because it will cherish the 
past glories <>f the dead Confederacy and transmute 
them into living inspirations for future sen ice to the 
living republic; of truth, because it will seek to gather 
and preserve as witnesses for history the unimpeach- 
able facts which shall doom falsehood to die that truth 
may live; of justice, because it w ill cultivate National, 
a- well as Southern, fraternity, and will condemn 
narrow-mindedness and prejudice and passion, and 
cultivate that broader, higher, and nobler sentiment, 
which would write on the gra'i e of every soldier who 
fell on our side. ' Here lies an American hero, a mar- 
tyr to the right a- his conscience conceived it.' 

"1 rejoin that,! general organization, too long neg- 
lected, has at last been perfected. It is an organization 
which all honorable men must approve and which 
Heaven itself will bless, [call upon you, therefore, 

to Organize in every State and community where ex- 
Confederates may reside, and rally to the support of 
tie' high and peaceful objects of the 1 nited Confed- 
erate Veterans, and move forward until by the power 
of organization and persistenl effort your hen. I'm cut 
and Christian purposes are fully accomplished." 

UNITED C0NFEDERAT1 V I I 1 I; V \ o Wli's. 

VIA I: VMA. 
P0ST01 ice c IMP. .N... ,.) 1 1CF.RS. 

Bessemei Bessemer 187... W. R. Jones, N. H. Sewall. 

Birmingham W. .1. Hardee 89.. F. s, Ferguson, U. K. Jones. 

Eutaw. Banders 84 G. II. Dole, F. 11. Mundy. 

Raphael Semmes.... 11, T. T. Roche, Wm. E. Mlckle. 
Montgomery. .Lomax 151 Emmet Selbels, J. H.HIgglns. 

ARKANSAS. 

Urns 1 ..in 11 

Ben ton vi He Cabell 89 N 3. Henry, A. J. Bates. 

c ' litre Polnl Haller 

Charleston Pat Cleburne 191... 

I "II" :cv , .1. II 1 ':o Is 218 

Kayette-v tile w 11 Brooks 

FortSmltb Ben T. Duval 1 in P. T. Devany, R. M. Fry. 

Greenwood. B< n Mci ullocb ...194. . 

Hark. 11 1 iltj .. Stonewall 199 . 

Hope 1 Iratiot 

Morrilton Robert W. Harper.,207... 

Nashi ill.- Joe Neal 202 

Van lair, n lohn Wallace 

FLORID \. 

Brookville W. W Loring 18 r. C. Da van t, F. L. Robertson- 

Chipley Chlpley 217... 

DadeClty PascoC.V. Vss'n. 17 J. B. Johnston, A. H. Ravesies. 

Fernandina ..Nassau 104., \\ . Naylor Thompson. 

Inverness. '•• ■". T. Wad 148...W. C. Zimmerman, W. S. Tur- 

ner. 

Jackson-* [lie.. ..R. E. Lee r .s Wm. Baya, W. w. Tucker. 

Jasper Stewart 165 H. .1. Stewart. .1. E. Hanna. 

Lake City. Columbia Co 150... W. K. Moore, W. M. Ives. 

Marianna Milton 182 vv D. Barnes, F. Philip. 

Monticello. Patton Anderson.... 59...W. C. Bird, B. W. Partridge. 

o.ala Marion Co.C. V. A . 58 ,.J. J. Kinl.y. Win. Fox. 

Orlando Orange Co 54... W. H. Jewell, B. M. Robinson. 

Palmetto Geo. T.Ward 58 11. Pelot, J. W. Nettles. 

Pensacola Ward C. V. Ass'n in . w. E. Anderson, K. J. Jordan. 

Quincy D. L. Kenan 1 in I; II. M. Da\ Idson, D. M. Mc- 
Millan. 

St. Augustine. ..E. Kirby Smith 176.. .J. A. Enslow, Jr. 

San ford Gen. .1. Finnegan 149. ..A. M. Thrasher, C. H. Lefler. 

Springdale Pat Cleburne — ...E. T. Candle, .7. s. Patterson. 

Tallahassee Lamar 161. ..R. A. Whitfield. 

Tain pa Hillsboro 86... F. W. Merrin, H. I.. Crane. 

Tltusville Indian River 47. ..J. Pritchett, A. D. Cohen. 



142 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



georgi \. 
postokh'f. cakp. so. 0fpicbb8. 

Atlanta Pulton •',>., Qa I59...W. L. Calhoun, J. P. Edwards. 

Dalton. Joa.E. Johnston M .A. F. Roberts, J. A. Blanton. 

Ringgold Ringgold 208... 

- Place John B. Gordon 50 R. E. Wilson. W. H. Ramsey. 

Illinois. 

Chicago Ex-Con. Ass'n 8..J. W. White, IS. I.. France. 

INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Ardmore John H. Morgan 107.. J. L. Gaut, H. scales. 

McAlester Jeff Lee 68. N. P. Guy, K. B. Coleman. 

KENTUCKY. 

Augusta John n. Hood Z83...Jno. s. Bradley, J. R. Wilson. 

Bowline; Green Bowling Green ...148...W. F. Perry, Jas. A. Mitchell. 

Cynthlana I 89...D. M. Bnyder, J. w. Boyd. 

I 'an villi- J. Warren Grigshy...'.!l I ,.E. M. Green, J. H. Baughman. 

Eminence E. Klrby Bmltb .151...W. I.. Crabb, J. B. Turner. 

Flemli Ibert 8. Johnston 232... Wm. Stanley. Milf'd i iverley. 

Georgetown Geo. W. Johnson . 98...A. II. Sinclair, J. Webb. 

Harrodsburg William Preston 96... R. W. Allin, John Kane. 

Lawrenceburg...Ben Har.lln Helm ...nil ..I'. H. Thomas, .!• P. Vaughn. 

Lexington I. C. Breckinridge ...100... John Boyd, G. ('. Bnyder. 

Bit. Sterling ....Roj B.I lluke 201...Thos.Johnson,W.T. Havens. 

Paducah A. P. Thompson 171 ... W. G. Bullitt. J. M. Brown. 

Paris John H. Morgan 95...A. T. Forsyth, Will A. Gaines. 

Richmond Thomas B. Collins.. .215...Jas. Tevis, N. B. Deatherage. 

Russellvllle John W. Caldwell...l89...J. B. Briggs, W. B. McCarty. 

Bhelbyvllle lohn H. Walker 287... W. F. Beard, R. T.Owen, 

Versailles Abe Buford 96. . I. C. Bailey, R. V. Bishop. 

LOUISIAN \. 
Alexandria Jefl Davis 6...G.O.Watts,W-W.Whlttlngton. 

Amite City Amite city 78... A. P. Richards, G. W. Banks- 
ton. 

Baton Rouge Baton Rouge 17 J. McGrath, F. W. Heroman. 

Berwick Winchester Hail 178. ..M. W. Bateman, F. 0. Brlen. 

Donaldson vlUe..Mai.V. Maurln 88.. .8. A.Foche, P. Ganel. 

Evergreen I;. L. Gibson 88... Wm. M. Swell, I. ('.Johnson. 

Lake Charles ..Calcasieu C. Vel ... 62...W.A.Knapp,W.L.Hutchlngs. 

I. l'n i\ i.i. nee. .Lake Providence 193... 

Mansfield Mouton 41...C. Bcbuler, T. G. Pegues. 

Merrick Isaiah Norwood 110...D. T. Merrick, J. J. Taylor. 

Natchitoches.. .Natchitoches 40 ..J. A. Prudhomme, c. K. Levy 

leans Army of N. Va ... 1...W. R. Lyman. T. B. O'Brien. 

New Orleans Army of Ten n 2....I. Glynn. Jr., N. Cuny. 

New Orleans Wash. Artillery la. .11. F. Eshelman, I.. A.Adam. 

New I mi. ans Henry St. Paul 16.. .J. Demoruelle, M. T. Ducros. 

Opelousas R.E.Lee 14... L. D. Prescott, B. Bloomfleld. 

Pi a. i a. ui in.' Iberville 18. ..C.H.Dickinson. J. L.Dardenne 

Bay vllle Richland 152.. J. 8. Bummerlln, 0. T. Smith. 

Rustin Rustin 7. ..A. Barksdale, J. L. Bond. 

Shreveport- Gen. Leroy Stafford S...W. Kinney, Will H. Tunnard. 

Tangipahoa Camp Moore 60. ..<>. P. Amacker, G. R. Taylor. 

Thlhodaux Braxton Brags! 196... 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Boonevllle W. H. H. Tlson.... 179 D. T. Beall, J. W. Smith. 

Brookhaven Sylvester Gwln 285.. .J. A. Hosklns, J. B. Da ugh try. 

Columbus [sham Harrison 27., B. A. Vaugban, W. A. Camp- 
bell. 

Crystal Sp'gs... ..Ben Humphreys 19...C. Humphries, J. M. Haley. 

Edwards W. A. Montgomery 26... W. A. Montgomery, H. W. 

Barrett. 

Fayette J.J. Whitney 22. ..W. L. Stephen, W. K. Penny. 

Greenwood Hugh A. Reynolds. .218... 

Greenville W. A. Percy — ,..S. W. Ferguson, W. G. Yerger. 

Grenada W. R. Barksdale 189... 

Hattlesburg Hall leshnrg 21...G. I). Hartfleld, E. H. Harris. 

H ndo He solo Mi. ..Sam Powell, C. H.Robertson. 

Hickory Flat ...Hickory Flat 219 ..W. a. Crum, J. J. Illeks. 

Holly Springs. ..Kit Mott 28...J. F. Fant.S. H. Pryor. 

Jackson Rolit. A. Smith 24 ,W. I). Holder. G. s. Green. 

Liberty Amite County 226...M. Jackson. Geo. A. McGee. 

Macon las. Longstreet. 180.. .W. H. Foote, J. L. Griggs. 

Meridian Walthall 2a... W. F. Brown, B. V. White. 

Miss. City Beauvolr 120...J. R. Davis, F. S. Hewes. 

Natchez Natchez 20...F. J.V. LeCand, K. L. Hopkins 

Port Gibson Claiborne 167...A. K. Jones, W. W. Moore. 

Rolling Fork.... Pat Cleburne 190... 

Rosedale Montgomery 52. ..F. A. Montgomery, ('has. C. 

Farrar. 



Mississippi- OmMniMd. 

POSMMTFICB. CAMI'. NO. OFFK'EKS. 

Tupelo John U.Stone 181. ..John M. stone, p. M. Savery. 

Valden Frank Llddell 221. 8. C. Balne, W. I. Boothe. 

Vlcksburg Vlcksburg S2...D. A. Campbell, C. Davla. 

Woods Ills W Ivllle 49...J. H. Jones, p. M. BtOCkett. 

xaxooCIt] .... Yazoo Camp 176.. .8. D. Robertson, w. r m>- 

Cutcheon. 

MISSOURI. 

Kansas City .Kansas City 80.. J. w. Mercer, G. B. Spratt. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Clinton Sampson 137. ..R. II. Holllday, c. F. Hcnlng. 

Concord. Cabarrus Co. C.V.A..212 . 

Newton <atawba 162. ..J. O. Hall, L. R. Whlteuer. 

OKLAHOMA. 

Norman Gen. J. B. Gordon 

Oklahoma C't. 1). H. Hammou .177 .. J. W. Johnston. J 1 1. I laaler. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Aiken Barnard E. Bee 84 B. II. Teague, J. N. Wigfall. 

si. Georges Stephen Elliott 51...J. Otey Reed. 

TENNESSEE. 

Chattanooga ..N. P.. Forrest I J. F. Sbipp, L. T. Dickinson. 

Clarksvlllc Forbes 77...T. H. Smith. Clay Slacker. 

Fay.ii, \ Hie ,Shacke]ford-Fulton..H4...J. D. Tillman. W. H. fashion. 

Franklin lohn L. McEwen., -...B.F. RohertB,R.N.Rlchardson 

Jackson lohn Ingram 37...E. s. Mallory. S. E. Klcrolf. 

Know ill.- Felix K. ZOlllCOffer...46...JnO. F, Horn, l has. Pueloux. 

Knoxvillc Fred Ault 5...F. A. Moses, J. W. s. Friers, m. 

Lew ishurg Dlbrell 55... W. P. Irvine, W. G. Loyd. 

McKenzIe. .. ... stonewall Jackson.. 42. ..Marsh Atklsson, J. P. cannon 

Memphis (on. His. Ass'n _'s c. w. I'la/er. U.J. Black. 

Murfreesboro loe B. Palmer 8L..W.S.McLe re.W.Ledbetter. 

Nashville Frank Cheatham.... 35... R. Lin Cave, J. P. Hick man. 

Bhelbyvllle Wm. Friersou 88...J. M. Hastings. J. G. Arnold. 

Tullahoma Pierce II. Anderson ..173 J. P. Bennett, W. J Tra\ Is, 

Winchester Turney 12...W. H. Brannan, J. J. Martin. 

TEXAS. 

Abilene \bilenc 72., 

Abilene Taylor Co ill' 

Alvarado Alvarado 160 

Athens Howdy Martin 65.. 

Atlanta Stonewall Jackson.. 91.. 

Austin lohn BHood 103.. 

Beaumont A. s. Johnston 75., 

Belton Bell Co. ex-Con. As.,122 

Bon bam Sul Ross 164. 

Brownwood stonewall Jackson..H8.. 

Bryan J. B. Robertson i-i 

Buffalo Gap L. F. Moody 128 

Calvert W. P. Townsend 111. 



Cameron Hen McCullough 29. 

Canton lames L. Hogg 188.. 

Carthage Horace Randall Ml. 

Cleburne Pat Cleburne 88. 

Colorado Albeit Sidney — . 

Col u ii i bus 8hropshlre-Upton...U2 

Coleman John Ptlham 76.. 

Corpus Chris! i.. Jos. E. Job 1 1 si on 03. 

Corslcana C. M. Winkler 147. 



I 'roekel t Crockett 

Caldwell Camp Rogers 

Dallas sterling Price 

Decatur Ben McCulloch 

Denton Sul Ross 

Dublin Erath .v Comanche. 

Emma Lone Star 

Fairfield Wm. L. Moody 

Forney Camp Bee 

Fori Worth R. E. Lee 



Frost R. ti. Mills 106. 

Gainesville los. E. Johnston llli. 

Galveston Mag ruder 105. 

Uatesvllle Ex-C. A.Coryell Co..l35. 

Goldthwaitc Jeff Davis 117. 

Gonzales Gonzales 156. 

Graham Young County. 127.. 

Gran bury Granbury 67. 



.T. W. Dougherty. 
H. I.. Bentley, Theo. Heyck. 

..I. R. Pose.V. 

.Ii. M. Morgan, W. T. Eustace. 
.J. D. Johnson, J. N. Simmons. 

W. M. Brown, c. 11. Powell. 

Jell Cbalsson, Tom J. Russell. 

H. M. Cook, R. H. Turner. 

J. P. Holmes. 

Carl Vincent, R. L. Archer. 
II. B. Stoddard.W. H. Harmon 
Ben F. Jones. J. J. Eubank. 
J. ll. Drennon, C. W. Hlggln- 

bol bam. 
.E.J. Mclver, J. B. Moore. 
T. J. Towies, w. u. Thompson 
J. it. Bond, J. M. Woolworth. 
.O. T. Plummer, M. s. Kahle. 
w V.Johnson, T. Q. Mullln. 
Geo. Mccormick, J. .1 Dick. 
J. J. Callan, J. M. William-. 
.H. R. Sutherland, M.C.Spann 
p. M. Collins. 

Enoch Braxson, J.F. Martin. 
..]. F. Matthews. 
.J. J. Miller, w. L. Thompson. 
Will A.Miller, A. Edwards. • 
Hugh McKenzie. J. R. Burton. 
J. T. Harris, L. E. Gillett. 

.G. T. Bradley. L. G. Sandifer. 

T. M. Daniel, S. G. Fleming. 

J. W. Friend, Eugene Burr. 
.A. Chamberlain, M. F. Wake- 

lield. 

J. M. Wright, J. T. Walker. 
..T.N. Waul, c. C. Beavans. 

W. 1.. Saunders. 
.J. E. Martin, F. M. Taylor. 

W. B. Sayers, M. Eastland. 
.A. T. Gay, Y. M. Edwards. 
.J. A. Formlvalt, I. R. Morris. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



i43 



TEXAS— Continued. 

POSTOFFICE. CAMP. NO. OFFICERS. 

Hamilton A. S. Johnston. 116. ..W. T. Saxon, C. C. Powell. 

Hemstead Tom Green 136 ..V. B. Thornton. S. Schwarz. 

Henrietta Sul Ross 172. ..F. J. Barrett, C. B.Patterson. 

Hlllsboro Hill County 166. ..Wm. A. Fields. 

Houston Dick Bowling 187... 

Kaufman Geo. D. Manion 145 . Jos. Huffmaster. E. s. Pipes. 

Kingston AS. Johnston 71. ..J. F. Puckett. T. J. Foster. 

Ladonia Robt. E. Lee 126...G. W. Blakeney, F. W. Blake- 

ney. 

Laiirange Pol. B. Timmons 61. ..R. H. Phelps. N. Holman. 

Lampasas R. E. Lee 66...J. S. Lauderdale, D.C. Thomas 

Lubbock F. R. Lubbock 138... W. D. Crump, (i. \V. Shannon. 

Madisonville Johh G. Walker 128. R. Wiley. 

Meridian A. 8. Johnston llo ..Robt Donnell. J. W. Adams. 

Merkel Merkel 79. ..J. T. Tinker, A. A. Raker. 

Hezla Joe Johnston 94...C. L. Watson. H. W. Williams. 

Minneola Wood County 15S...J. H. Hntlmast. r. <;. A. Cage. 

Mt. Enterprise ..Rosser 82...T. Turner, B. Blrdwell. 

Mt. Pleasant Ool. Dud Jones r.M ...c. L. Dillahunly. J. c. Turner. 

Montague Bob Stone 98. R. Bean, I!. D. Rugeley. 

McKinney Collin County 109 W. M. Hush. 11. c. Hack. 

Navasota Pat Cleburne 102 w. E. Barry. R. M. West. 

Oakville John Donaldson — ... 

Palestine Palestine 11 J.W.Ewlng, J. M. Fulllnwlder 

Paris A. s. Johnston 70 G. H. Provine, J. W. Webb 

Paint Roek Jeff Davis ... .188 W.T.Melton, J.W.Ratcuford. 

Ro.kwall Rockwall Ti M. S. Austin, N. C. Edwards, 

Rob] w. w. i.oring 11 D. Spcer, W. B. smltb. 

Sun Antonio A. 8. Johnston 144. ..John s. Ford, Taylor McRae. 

Seymour Bedford Forrest 88 T. H. C. Peery, R. J. Browning. 

Sherman Mildred Lee 90...J. T. Wilson, R. Walker. 

Sweetwater. K. c. Walthall 92 w. D. Beall, J. H. Freeman. 

Sulphur Sp'gS.. Matt Ashcrofl 170 R.M. Henderson. M. G. Miller. 

Taylor A. s. .Johnston [85.. M- ROSS, P. Hawkins. 

Tyler V.S.Johnston 18... J. P. Douglas, 8. S. Johnson. 

Vernon Camp Cabell 125 S. 1 Hatchett, M. D. Davis. 

Waxahachle led' iiavis 108...R.P. Mackey.W.M McKnlght 

Weatberford ..Tom Green 169. ..J. P. Rice, M. V. Klnnlson. 

Wichita l-aiis ..W.J. Hardee 7:; c.R.o,,.ek. tt.N. A. Robinson. 

VIRGINIA. 

Ream- Mat ion „J, E li. Stuart 211... 

Richmond George ]•:. Pickett-.. •joi 

Roanoke William Walt-.. 

Williamsburg ..McGruder-Ewell .. . 210 

WASHINGTON, 1> C. 
Washington Wash. City Con 171. ..Albert \k. rs 



FIRST CONFEDERATE CONGRESS. 



Organizations not members of the I 1 1 i t <*< 1 Confed- 
erate Veterans arc to be reported in full as soon .is in- 
formation is received. There are in Tennessi e twenty- 
two Bivouacs, including seven organizations of sons. 

i I. I BIVOUAC .11 I r I RS, 

Columbia Leonidas Polk I. II Fussell, W. B Dobbins. 

Gallatin. Daniel S. Donelson ..J. W. Blackmore, .1 A. Trousdale, 

Tto> Warren McDonald. ..P. J. Cummins, Alex. N. Moore. 

Dickson James E. Rains... W. J. Mathls, J. M. Talley. 

Lynchburg.. .Woody B. Taylor ....John D. Tolley, D. P. \n. n. 

Pan-. Fitzgerald-Lamb P. R-Orr, A. H. Lankford. 

Dresden Jenkins 1 . M. 1 ■'.« ing, John D. McK 

Lebt n Robert Hat ton A. K. Miller, G. R. Gwynn. 

Gaiuesboro, S. S.Stanton M. L. Gore, N. B. Young. 

Alamo Joseph E. Johnston. J. B. Humphreys, D. B. Dodson. 

Trenton O. F. strahl I. C. McDearman, Wm. Gay, 

cook e\ ill*- Pat Cleburne Walton Smltb, W. P.Cbapln. 

Brownsville. Hiram s. Bradford., tie... C Porter. A. D. Bright. 

Hartsvtlle Barksdale W.J. Hah. \.s. Reaves. 

Rl. 1. II. ton E. L. Bradley Thos. w. Cosby, B. N. High. 

McMinnvllleJ3avage — Hackett (officers not reported 

suss OF CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS— TENNESSEE DIVISION. 
POS i.M 1. v. BIVOUAC. OFI ICERS. 

Wln< heater Albert s. Marks A. H. Mark- Died Sept. 6, 1892), Jo 

I . < larner. 
Nashville. Thos. C. Hlndman....Biscoe Hlndman, Jas. F. Haget 

Clarksville ... Alfred Robb F. s. Beaumont, (has. W. Smith. 

Galneaboro.. J. S. Quarles l». H. Morgan, s. li. \ . Young. 

Knowiiie . .1. V. H.stuart J. W. Green, .1. W. ft Frierson, Jr. 

Franklin W. P. Rucker L. W.. Buford, Lee S McEwen. 

McKenzie. .. Jeff Davis E. L.Cunnlngharn, J. L. Thompson 



From the Chattanooga Rebel, which is being given to 

patrons who send stamp with request: 

The following is a list of the members of the first Congress, first 
session, of the permanent Government of the Confederate States: 



At. AltAMA. 

Wm. L. Yancey, 

C. C. Clay, Jr. 

ARKANSAS. 

Robert W. Johnson, 
J. B. Mitchell. 

FLORIDA. 

Jame- M. Baker. 
N. E. Maxw.ll. 



SENATE. 

KENTCCK1. 

Henry C. Burnett, 
Wm. E. Sims. 

lot ISIANA. 

Edward Sparrow. 
T. J. Semmes, 

Kissrssippi. 

A. Q. Brown. 
James Phelan. 



NORTH CAROLINA. 

George Davis. 
Wm. T. Dortch. 

si irni .a KottN v. 
Robert W. Barnwell. 
James L, Orr. 

TENNESSEE. 

Gustave A. Henry, 
l.an.ion c. llaynes. 



GEORGIA. Ml — il-m. 

John W. Lewis, John B. Clarke. 

B. H. Hill. R. I. E. Peyton. 

VIRGINIA.— R. M. T. Hunter. Wm. Ballard Preston 



TEXAS. 
Louis C. Wigfall. 
W. s. Oldham, 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



A I. A HAM V. 

IMst. 

1 T. J. Foster. 

2 W. R. Smith. 
8 J. P. Ralls. 

4 J. L. M.Curry, 

5 F. s. Lynn, 

. W. F. Chilton. 

7 D, Clopton, 

- J. K. Fu| 

9 s. Dorgan. 

AREAS- \-. 

1 A. <;. Garland, 

8 .la-, m. Patterson. 

I ncom plete. 

FLORIDA. 
1 Jas. B. Hawkins, 
P, Hilton. 

1 Julian Hartrldge, 

2 C. J. Monnerlyu. 

,'t Hlnes Holt. 

1 Aim U K.. nan. 

II Id v> Lew 1-. 

6 \\ . W. Clark. 

7 Robert P. Tril.pe. 

- Lucius J. Gartrell, 
■1 iiar.lv Strickland, 

Ig. R. Wright. 
• KENTUCKY. 

1 Alfr.-.l Boyd, 

2 John W. 1 'rockett, 
11. E. Read, 

1 George W. Ewlng, 

5 J. S.( In i-man. 
li L. T. Burnett. 
7 H. W. Bruce, 

- o 11 II' 



'l 1 M. Bruce. 

10 .1. W. Moore, 

11 R.J. Breckenrldge. 

12 J. M. Elliott. 

LOUISIANA. 

1 Charles J. VUllere, 

J ( ha-. M. Conrad, 
Duncan p. Kenner, 

4 Luclen J. Dupi 

5 John 1.. Lewis, 

ii John Perkins, Jr. 

mississi PPI. 

1 J. W. Clapp, 

2 Reuben Davis, 

el Welch. 
I H.C. I 'hainhers. 

5 0. R. Singleton, 

8 E. Bark- 

7 John J. McRae. 

MISS. 

1 W. M. Cook, 

2 T. C. Harris. 

:; Casper W. Bell, 

I \.lam II. Condon. 

1 .. w est, 
1. L. W. I 1. .man. 
8 Dj er. 

NORTB CAl 

1 W. N. 11 STiiith, 

2 R. R. I.M 

. . ' 1: ECeenan, 
1 T. D. McDowell, 

\. U. Arlington. 
1. J. R. McLean. 
7 T. s. A-be. 
- Wm. I.an.lor. 



Dlst 

9 R. S. Gaither, 
10 A. T. Davidson. 

SOUTH . AHoI.INA. 

1 John McQueen, 

2 W. Porcher Miles. 
1 M. Aver. 

4 M. 1. Ronham. 
i James Farrow, 
n W. W. !'...>. •• . 

■ N 1 -SEE. 

1 .!.... ph B 11. i-kell, 

2 W. G. swan, 

8 U ,1, Iron-. 

I E. F. liar. lent 

5 Henry S. Foote, 
7 M. P. Gentry. 

- Thomas Menees, 

9 I D.C. Atkln-. 

10 John V. Wright. 

11 D. M. Currln. 

TK\ V- 

1 m. li. Gai 

2 John B Cbambliss, 
:; John Tyler. 

i Roger A. Prynr. 
5 Tbonia- s. Bo.aek. 

hn Goode, Jr.. 
7 James P. Holcombe, 

- D.C. DeJarnette, 
li William smith. 

zander R. Bote. 

11 John B. Baldwin-. 

12 Walter K. staple. 
18 Walter Pn 

11 viberl G. Jenkins, 

15 Robert Johnson. 

16 1 has. W. Russell. 



The Farmington Moni mi n r. — The oldest villaj 
Tennessee is Farmington. Its leading citizens, in war 
times, held to the cause of the Union, and there was 
very little sympathy manifested for the Confederates. 
Gen. Joseph Wheeler's cavalry corps had a hard fighl 
in the vicinity, and lost many gallant men. Maj. 
McDowell, who commanded " Forrest's old battalion, 
W as among the killed. The families removed the 
known to the cemeteries, but there were nine gallant 
martyrs whose identity could not be ascertained, and 
they* were buried by the roadside. After the war 
Messrs, Bement Chapman, Cols. J. R. Neil, J. H. Li wis 
and others determined to erect a monument to their 
memory. Enclosed within a rock wall is the shaft, 16 
feet high. The inscriptions are pathetic. Oneofthem 
i- as follows : 

[Jo useless coffin inclosed their breasts. 
Nor in sheet imr shroud we buried them, 

But they lie like warriors taking tlieir rest, 
With tlieir martial cloaks around them. 

The Dibrell Bivouac of Lewishurg maintains the 
fostering care of this sacred place, and decorates the 
phi.c each year. May 16 is the date for the next gath- 
ering there. Thanks to Capt. W. G. Loyd, Adjutant 
of the Bivouac, for an invitation to attend. 



144 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



i'hc (Confcdcvatc ilctcvan. 

Fifty Cents a Year. 8. A. CUNNINGHAM. Editor 

Office al i r ■ Imerli m, Corner Cbarch and Cherry Sts. 

This pabllcatlon is tin- personal property of S. A.< unmngham. 
Money paid for u «l * »• - not augment the Monument Fund directly, 
butat an auxiliary it- benefit oerlalnly makes It eminently worths 
the patronage of ever) Mend of tl 

SUGGESTIONS TO SUBSCRIBERS. 

Don 1 ! buy postoffice orders for small amounts, postage Btampsor 
postal notes are better, being less expensive In sending stamps lei 
tbem be of two One cent stamps are admissible, bul 

larger are Inconvenient. In sending clubs, wbere the work Is com- 
pliment ■ Is, deduct cost ..r exchs 

i nir earnesl trades and friends who are zealous for the Con- 

FEDl RATE Vl rBRAV Can -1" 11 a \ alual SabUSing t la- 

in mils nt Indifferent persons who think It is specially for old soldiers, 
and assuring tbem it atlng with full life In accord 

with the limes. It- purpose Is to show the South In a true light, and 
ced property, comfort, and often life, 
through tin on to principle. 



.similar to that for which our fathers fought. It seems 
liuw that the most important difference is becoming 
a political question, and the Confederate side may he 
adopted in the United States. It is that of making 
a single term for President, and for a term of six in- 
stead of four years. 



An interesting event to the Southern people will be 
the burial of Jefferson Davis at Hollywood Cemetery, 
Richmond, Va.. May 31st, 1893. The body was de- 
posited in the vault of Army of Northern Virginia, at 
New Orleans, at the time of his death. There'is now 
a family lot in Hollywood, selected by Mrs. Davis. 

A term born in equity, and nurtured by the vilest 
sentiment known to American citizenship, and so in- 
geniously used as to secure advocates among conserva- 
tive people, is the detestible prefix to our beloved Smith. 
Old South is sometimes used in contra-distinction. 
Li i ill who join in the spirit of progress(?) be careful 
of this phrase, remembering that the word "New" in 
such connection was conceived and its adoption urged 
by a class who came among us for spoils, and sought 
to put the"bottom rail on top." We have changed 
conditions, but the dear old South is good enough. 

[f any mistake the spirit of this Veteran, through 
its disposition to respect and honor men who fought 
to maintain the Union, and who declared the war 
ended in 1865, they may know now and forever that 
it will never tody to a sentiment that eompromises 
the Southern people of ante-bellum times. No meaner 
spirit has ever prevailed than that which has sought 
to give outsiders the honor for the development of 
our God given resources. 

"Tin; war is not over with me," said 1 to some 
Northern people, who manifested surprise at the 
remark. "We could not whip you with our guns, 
and I am now trying to do it with kindness." 

We do not truckle to tin- sentiment of being deceit- 
ful for pilfer. Whether we of the South want it or 

not. we are destined to 1 ne people, and we want to 

make the 1" -t of it. We are no more loval to the 
principles of constitutional liberty now than when we 
tried to keep the stars and stripes out of Dixie. The 
Southern people (it will be remembered by actors of 

'he time, and should he learned ami remembered by 

succeeding generations) adopted a Constitution very 



Reconstruction is not a well understood term. If 
it means acceptance of the " situation " simply, then 
most men are reconstructed. It does not imply un- 
compromising belligerence to say that one is not re- 
constructed. The meaning generally is to detest the 
sentiment of concession lor policy, which some have 
done who breathe the fragrance of air in Dixie. 

People who will not tolerate insolence from an in- 
ferior class or race are quickly considerate. If a gen- 
tlenian accidentlj collides with a ruffian he i~ prompt 
to "heir pardon," and if the other be resentful the 
instinct is to down him. I rur people are \ cry consid- 
erate of others, but they demand courtesy in return. 

The Veteran is anxious to publish the truth for its 
own side, hut in giving this letter it suggests that the 
conditions might have been such as to enable 35,000 
men to hold out indefinitely against 46,000. How- 
ever, this comment is not intended to condone the 
palpable error referred to : 

In a costly cyclopedia, edited by Richard Gleason 
Greene, and published in New York by Dodd, Mead 
& Co., 1890, it is stated that at the second battle of 
Manassas, or Bull Run, the Federals under Pope, or 
commanded by Pope and McDowell, numbered only 
:'h>.hihi men, against 16,000 Confederates commanded 
by Lee, Jackson, and Longstreet. Now if this is the 
truth it ought to be accepted and believed by both 
parties, but if untrue, no matter how high the author- 
ity that sustains it. it ought to be assailed and discred- 
ited. The idea of 46,000 Con federates under such 
leaders as l.ee and Jackson, having to light 35,000 
federal-, commanded by Pope or anybody else, three 
days before they could rout them, is too absurd for a 
child to believe. Dr. Dabney, one of Jackson's chap- 
lains, jdaees the number of men under Pope and Mc- 
Dowell, including reinforcements from McLelland's 
army, at about lUO.OlH). .laekson.in closing his report 
of the campaign, states that the"command occupied 
an isolated and perilous position " while contending 
with "greatly superior numbers of the enemy." Jack- 
son and Dabney should be good enough authority t'or 
us. Felix S. Motlow. 

Mulbi ir I/, '/'. mi. 

The Ladies' Memorial Association of Montgomery 
are building, on Capital Hill a monument to the Con- 
federate dead in Alabama, which is to cost, when com- 
pleted, $45,000. Notwithstanding this Herculean work 
for that Association, which was organized away back 
in war times, and has been heavily burdened for a 

generation, gave an entertainment for the great mon- 
ument in which all alike are interested, and netted 
$1 13.85, which amount is credited in the list as com- 
ing through the President, Mrs. M. D. Bibb. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



i45 



There is an important bit of unwritten history in 
the diary of Vice-President Alexander H. Stephens. 
It is the pathetic fact that the renowned statesman, 
despite all constitutional law, seriously feared the 
result of his captivity. He did not show the defiance 
clearly manifest by the Chieftain, by some vilely 
called "arch traitor," his only superior in Confederate 
authority. 

There is an exquisite sentiment of concern by him 
in the failure of his captors to secure Roberl Toombs 
also, when they went to his home, Washington, Ga. 
His devotion to the man whose fame will ever lie 
intensified by the declaration that "we were not 
whipped, but wore ourselves out whipping them," 
was remarkable. Onanoccasion [expressed surprise 
that he and Toombs were so very different in public 
matters ami yet were so very intimate, lie replied, 
" Toombs speaking and Toombs acting were very dif- 
ferent things." 



Mr. Stephens' timidity on this occasion would mis- 
lead as to his personal courage, for it will he remem- 
bered that he frequently challenged -trout; men to 
personal combat without hesitation, feeble as he 
always was, if he felt the least reflection upon his 
honor. The composure of Mr. Davis under trial did 
not mislead as to his desperation under outrageous 
treatment. When, being ignominiously shackled in 
prison, and he begged the guards t<> kill him. he taught 
a lesson of heroism that should not he forgotten. 



In connection with the personal courage of Mr. 
Davis, and his peril, which must have been tar greater 
than that of Mr. Stephens, reference 1- madetoa story 
which has been one of the sensation- of daily papers 
recently. It i- to the eileet that while Mr. Davis was 
being sent to Fortress Monroe he was tried by a mock 
court, " the court " being made by a number of officers 
on hoard the United State- steamer Pontoosuc, then 
acting as guard of the transport Clyde, who deter- 
mined to avenge the assassination of Mr. Lincoln by 
the execution of Mr. Davis. Ensign -1. J. Kane, a 
noted marksman, now Chaplain of the Brooklyn Navy 
Yard, was -elected to lire the fatal shot. The other 
passengers on the Clyde besides Mr. Davis were his 
wife, sister, and three children. Mr. Stephens, Mr. 
Reagan, Postmaster General; clement C. clay ami 
wile. General Wheeler and stall', t lolonel Johnson and 
Lubbuck, of Davis' stall'. Major Morand, Captain 
Moody, Lieutenant Hathaway and several privates. 

The event as repented by Kane i- substantially as 
follows : 

"Mr. Davis was sitting in a steamer chair on the 
deck of the Civile. It was a clear day. and 1 could 
see him as plainly as it' he had been hut one hundred 
feet away. 1 loaded an Enfield rifle 1 had picked up 
on the "battle-field of Fort Fisher, and resting the 
muzzle in an air port, aimed it at the heart of Davis. 



I feel confident I could have sent a bullet to the tar- 
get, hut some influence prevented me from pulling the 
trigger. 

MYSTERIOUSLY RESTRAINED. 

"'1 can't do it,' I said to my comrades, but they 

urged me to tire, and said 1 would he justified in 
doing so. 'It would he murder,' I said, and one of 
them answered. 'Think of the death of Lincoln.' 
With that I took aim again, and even touched the 
trigger, but a psycological force I now think was of 
divine origin prevented me from doing the act which 
would have ruined me forever after. 1 still hesitated, 
however, and was still aiming when the little daugh- 
ter of Davis came mi deck with a lady who was proba- 
bly her mother, and ran into her lather's arms. It 
was then impossible to shoot without endangering the 
life of the little girl, and I laid up the gun. A short 
time afterward, and before the child had left the arms 
of its father, the vessels drifted apart, making it im- 
possible for any of the other officers to do the killing. 
"1 have been thankful ever since that I was re- 
strained from doing what would have been an 
extremely rash act, and 1 have never until now related 
the incident except with a requirement of secrecy." 

What merciless times those were! It will shake 
the credulity of the Southern people now to consider 
the distrust of Northern people in regard t" one 
another. The wife of Gen. Hancock, that noble 
woman who died recently, in her reminiscences of 
her honored husband, states: "The spy system was so 
thoroughly established during the war that nearly 
every household was invaded by one or more in the 
employ of the Government. On two occasions were 
these ' features detected in my own house. 1 reported 
tin fact to Mr. Stanton, and commented to him upon 
the lack of confidence shown by the Government 

towards loyal officers and their families." 

Think of spies in the homes of Confederate G< n< 
Such thing wa- never thought of in connection with 
Confederate privates. 

Omissios occurred in the brief -ketch of Gen. 1'.. 
Kirby-Smith in the last Veteran of his exact age. 
That he graduated from the West Point Military 
\, ademy in l s l-"' gave an approximate, lie was horn 
in St. Augustine, Fla., May 1»;, 1824. He came from 
an illustrious family of soldier-. His grandfather 
served both against the French and the British, being 
a major in the Revolutionary war. Hi- father wa-a 
colonel in the war of 1812, and was afterwards made 

United States Judge of the Supreme Court of Florida. 
Hiselder brother, Ephraim, wa- killed in the Mexican 
war. General Kirby-Smith married Mi-- Cassia Sel- 
don. of Virginia, in 1863. 

An earnest plea is made to every person who is 
friendly to this enterprise to do as quickly as practica- 
ble what is merited. Write to correct errors in names 
of subscribers. If you like the publication ami in- 
tend to subscribe, do so promptly, please. It you can 
procure other subscribers please do it right away. 



146 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



MY KENTUCKY COMRADE, GRANT. 



following sketch is written for two reasons: 
Fir>t. to entertain the readers of the Confederate 
Veteran, and then in the hope, if the man (Irant is 
living, he may be found. 

When II 1- army was thoroughly routed from its 

position, before Nashville, I escaped from a very haz- 
ardous position, where my immediate associates Bur- 
rendered. It was a perilous run for a Long distance, 
ami I was stunned by the scene, wherein a company 
officer had the top of his head shut oil' just hefore me 
a-> we ran through an open field. I had hesitated be- 
fore that, to consider whether 1 should shoot an enemy 
whose daring tread into our scattered army, ahead of 
all his comrades, had excited my admiration, and I 
g to -pare him when he made quick aim at 
one of my comrades. After marching in quick time 
through ravines away from the south-bound turnpike 
along which the enemy had long sweep with rifle can 
non. I finally got onto it. and ere the light of another 
day dawned I was wesl of Franklin, where a mule was 
lent me on which to continue my journey. More 
than three years had elapsed without a sight of home, 

from which I had never before been absent as many 

weeks. At Spring Hill, where the failure of a few- 
week- before to make battle had lost us a great victory, 
I caughl up with Frank Cheatham, my Major Gen- 
eral, and with assurance that the army would stay at 
Columbia several day-, and with verhal permission to 
goto my home east of Columbia, I had made excel- 
lenl headway on the little mule, considering that 
much of the time I had to Hank the enemy to keep 
him from Hanking ln c. and at nightfall I was at the 
lead of the army while it waited for placing a pontoon 

bridge aero-- I >uck river. 



A half hour before reaching the river I Incidentally 

conversed with a young cavalryman who gave his 
name as Grant and hi- State as Kentucky. On our 
advance he was wounded at Spring Hill, ami should 
not have been on the road hut for the advancing 
enemy. He manifested very sincere attachment for 
lin'. and proposed to verify it by staying with me 
through the night in the rain, if I should fail to gel 
by the vigilant guards al the river hank, ami also at 

tin- ponto mtrance. across theswollen river. Orders 

were to pas> only the wounded, except with' their 
regular commands. Grant gave me his crutch, and 
riding up to the firsl guard, he told him he was 
wounded, also that I belonged to his company and 
was detailed to go with ami assist him. This excuse 

1 us to the bridge en t ranee, and just as the officer 
guarding it was about to test of our merit to pass as 
"both wounded," some intensely exciting circum- 
stance induced him to leap from his place, and we 
rod 1 to the narrow bridge, without side protection. 



We had gone to the center of the stream, and were 
waiting for the pontoon wagons to move off for we 

were at the head of the army 1, when my mule stepped 
backward for a better position to rest. Unhappily, his 

backward movement was at Buch an angle that very 
soon his hind feet were at the edge of the bridge. It 
was evidently easier to have him L r o further hack than 
to regain proper place on the bridge, and. as if hound 
by a spell, he 60 changed position that, sooner than I 
can write it. we were both head and cars under water. 
I was a poor swimmer, and the chill of the water that 
December night — the lxth— may be imagined. For- 
tunately, we fell at the upper side of the bridge, ami 
on coming to the top, there was the merest edge of a 
plank on the under slope of a pontoon, on which 1 gol 
hold with my finger tips. In falling, my little ani- 
mal turned up a floor plank, and on clearing my eyes 
of the muddy water, 1 discovered that the large horse 
of my friend Grant was standing astride the opening, 
and with hi- heels on the ends of the planks directly 
over my head. I hallowed an appeal to move his 
horse forward, hut it was unavailing. The monstrous 
animal, under a wounded man wdio could not swim, 
stepped backward, and down into the stream he fell. 
It seemed miraculous that he did not knock me from 
my hold, hut I ''tucked" my head under the best 1 
could, and held my position. ( i rant fell on the bridge. 
Our animals swam to the right side of the river, and 
we were soon on them, riding through the suburbs of 
Columbia in the rain. My hat ami blanket were float- 
ing oceanward, ami as the heavy drops of rain were 
like lumps of lead, to protect my head, (I rant gave me 
his hlanket ami took the rain. 



We spent the night together at a cottage, and we 
enjoyed warm "crackling" bread. Although no dry 
(dot Ins were offered, we burroughed about t wo feet into 
a pile of cotton, and I had the sweetest and most re- 
freshing sleep of my life. Grant was inclined to go 
home with me, hut he w isely decided to avoid the risk 
of capture. From that cottage — whose miserly owner 
of seventy years died, leaving a beautiful wife of 
twenty, who soon found a younger husband— Grant 
and I journeyed a quarter of a mile together the next 
morning. Our roads forked, ami have never since 
come together. He was in the cavalry service from 
Kentucky. Address S. A. CUNNINGHAM, Nashville. 

W. K. Moo,-,-, Welborn, Fla.: "1 send three sub- 
scriptions. The paper should he iii every family in 
the South." 



Life of Senator Benjamin II. Hill. — Agents wanted every- 
where for "The Life, Speeches, ami Writings of Senator lieii- 
jarain II. Hill." Special inducements to young men and 
women who desire to make money to complete their educa- 
tions, and to all who desire to attend the several Business and 
Medical Schools and the Law School of this city. Address, 

3-4 T. II. P. Bloodwortii, Atlanta, (ia. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



x 47 



PASSING MANASSAS, 1892. 



BY LILLIAN ROZELL-MESSENGER. 



Here's where it thundered 

From field to field, and through valley to valley. 

Then 1 , where the line was bluest, 

Crash, fell the volley truest! 
Then broke the legions, then the grand rally, 

And day wept and wondered. 

Here's where the battle Same, 
The cannon and tumult, uproared to heaven ; 

Then through the azure wall, 
As grey legions rise and fall ; 

There's wailing and triumph, the land in twain riven 

By shocks of Manassas' fame ! 

There's when' the sundered 
And grand, stricken armies once wavered and fell ; 

There's where the oritlanie 

Of a new nation's birth came, 
'Bove tumult and fires as if risen from hell : 

And the world gazed and wondered. 

Here now a pilgrim passed, 
Pale from the terror and roar of life's battle ! 

She's \\e|>t o'er the living, 

The dead, lost, and dying ; 
And voices Stilled ever by deal h's chilly rattle, 

While 1 lope was the last. 

Life-angel to leave her' 
Long since faith, and love, as heroes inglorious, 

Fell in wrong's night-terror, 
. Like Justice struck by Error; 
But when the column breaks, comes one victorious! 

Death, the true victor, cannot deceive her. 



OUR SOUTHERN WOMEN IX WAR TIMES 



VIVID REMIXISCEXI-ES BY MRS. V. JEFFERSON /ell IS 



The women of the_ South did not shrink from the 
prospect of great and painful economies; they also ap- 
preciated that their own patriotic duty was, as cheer- 
fully as possible, to bid farewell to the men of their 
family who must go to the front, perhaps never to re- 
turn. Sometimes hope buoyed them up, and they 
looked on the sunny side and believed that their dear 
ones would l»e spared because their cause was righteouB. 
They did shrink, however, affrighted from the pros 
pect of being left alone with a multitude of ignorant 
negroes who might he instigated to rebellion, without 
physicians to attend their children or priests to bury 
them if they died. These horrors oppressed them. 

Many a woman, buckling on her husband's sword, 
asked him to show her how to load and shoot a pistol, 
adding, "not that I am afaid of any thing, hut in case 
of need." Her next problem was how to handle that 
pistol, which was an ohject of almost as great dread as 
WOuld he the foe it was to repel. 

GOOI> CONDUCT OF THE NEGROES. 

All Southern women acknowledge with pride the 
good conduct id' the rank and tile of negroes on the 
Breaking out of tin 1 war. They generally remained 
true to the families left in their charge, and protected 
the women and children to the host of their ability. 
In short, their course was a powerful testimonial to 
the life-long kind and just exercise of their masters' 
power over them. 

However, the crops failed frequently. The negroes 
grew to partake more or less of the excitement which 
pervaded the whole country, and this interfered with 



the needful routine of their labor. Then again, the 
work horses were levied upon for the use of the Gov- 
ernment. Thus were the means of cultivation nar- 
rowed. The fallow land grew impassable with weeds, 
the fences and levees fell, the tields which had waved 
with corn and the cotton blooms became a tangle of 
vines ami hushes. " unprotitahly gay with the blue 
flowers of the destructive morning glory, the execrated 
tie-vine.'' 

Moreover, all large balances id' cash lay out of reach, 
invested, so that there was little wherewith to buy 
from the neighboring tow ns or cities ; and as the pros- 
perity of these ci titers was dependent upon the grain 
and cotton sent in from the plantations, want came 
upon all. 

The very poor suffered in the absence of their bread- 
winners. Necessarily those hotter provided for gave 
of their surplus, and when they became sorely pressed 
themselves they shared whatever could he spared by 
their families; as the poorer classes expressed it, they 
" had a divide." * * * 

The harbors were closed by the blockade. No sup- 
plies of clothing could he imported. The time came 
when the stock of cloth, shoes, medicines, machinery — 
indeed, of almost every thing necessary to civilized 
people— was nearly exhausted. The South had proved 
agriculture to he the most profitable employment, and 
had never fostered manufactures; besides, her opera- 
tive classes were not suited to the care of machinery. 
Now the people found themselves confronted with 
new problems which they must learn to solve. All 

these needs must he supplied by the women. 

The store each family possessed themselves, of quin- 
ine, and such other drugs as were needful Foi the dis- 
i ises of a warm climate, was gradually relinquished 
tor the use oi the soldiers Replenishment was im- 
possible. Quinine had been proclaimed by the block- 
aders " contraband of war." 

The women turned, undaunted, to the indigenous 
materia medica. Decoctions of willow hark, of dew- 
berry root, orange flowers and leaves, red pepper tea 
and other "tisanes" took tin place of the drugs. 

One heart-broken woman wrote to her husband: 
' "Twenty grains of quinine would have saved our two 
children. They were too nauseated to drink the hit- 
ter willow tea. and tiny are now at rest, and I have 
no one to work for hut you. Do not think of coming. 
I am well and strong, and am not dismayed. I think 
day and night of your sorrow. I have their little 
graves near me." 

imw i i in iiini. w \- i ox Tim i d 

The sheep were sheared; the wool was cleansed, 

carded and spun in the house. Small looms were set 
up and the warp adjusted under the eye 'of the prac- 
tical weaver — this being the mistress, generally. All 
the clothes for the plantation, as well as some doth to 
exchange for other commodities, was woven for the 
winter use. In winter the cotton clothe- were made 
for summer. Pretty homespun checks, brown, black, 
blue, or red and white, were manufactured fur the la- 
dies' and children's frocks. The ladies spun the wool 
and knitted the stockings and socks their children and 
husbands wore, also many for the soldiers. 

When the longing for the silk stockings, habitually 
used, pressed upon refined women, the old pieces of 
black silk were picked to a ''frazzle" and spun to make 
stockings and gloves for themselves and their daugh- 
ters. Said one, putting out her nattily clad slender 



148 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



little feel : " 1 could not bear to wear coarse stockings, 
my husband takes such pride in my small feet." 

Towels and sheets were -pun from < -» • 1 1 < ► t » to replace 
the house linen which had been cul into bandages, or 
scraped into lint for the surgeons in the field. One 
handsome young woman, the daughter of an ex-Min- 
ister to Spain, rises before me out of the haze of by- 
gone years, stepping lightly to and fro winding band- 
in the spindle of her wheel and talking pleasantly 
to her visitors, while her patriotic mother sat by cut- 
ting up the table linen which she had treasured for 
forty years, The daughter showed great callous knots 
on her shapely hands made by scraping lint, and men- 
tioned them with an expression of gratitude to God 
that she could procure material for so much work. 

A genera] ofiicer's wife called in sec the wife of the 
ident and brought her, as the most acceptable 
nt, a paper pattern of a glove like those she her- 
self wore, beautifully embroidered and exactly fitted 
to her delicate hands. This paper pattern is still ex- 
tant, and very precious to the recipient. It was very 
useful in providing the President's whole family with 
presentable gloves made from the sleeves and breast 
of an old Confederate uniform and the cast-off black 
cloth garments of the gentlemen of the family. 

Ladies plaited exquisite straw hats and bonnets, and 
learned every brand except that of Leghorn. The 
birds of the country furnished feathers for their adorn- 
ment. 

INGENIOUS LUXURIES. 

When new companies or battalions organized, for 
which Sags were needed, the sisters and sweethearts 
of the men sacrificed their best silk frocks to make 
the flags. With cunning embroidery they emblazoned 
them in such royal style that they are wondrously 
beautiful even in this day of the Renaissance. Is it 
astonishing that our men wrapped these flags about 
their bodies and. like the -tern Scotch father who gave 
another and another son " for Eachim," died one after 
the other to preserve them from capture? 

The snippings left by the army tailors, pieces of gray 
and black cloth five or six inches across, were pieced 
together and then cut into jackets for the soldiers' 
children. Very acceptable these "Joseph's coats" 
proved to those who eon Id boast no better covering. 

Such rags as could be utilized in no other way were 
wound in halls and woven into carpets, which did duty 

in place of those long since cut up for horse and sad- 
dle blankets, and these home-made carpets were con- 
tributed later as the need of them arose. 

Hits of the clippings of the best gown were sewed 
neatly over the wornout house slippers of the women, 
and they straightway became dandy little congeners 
of the gown, and were dainty to look upon, as well as 
objects of pride to their owners. 

Flannel was very scarce, and cosl 815 or $20 a yard; 
but underwear was knitted of homespun wool, and 
was quite as comfortable as the woven. l>ves were 

made of the juice Of plan!,-. The raw silk wound 

from cocoons was dyed and twisted into very smooth 
thread. The finest and most even flax thread, nearly 
as Btrong as wire and quite as smooth and fine as sew- 
ing silk, was made in Virginia, and even now there is 
none 50 good in the market. 

HOW WE LIGHTED 0UE HOUSES. 

Lampwicks were plaited by hand and the oil was 

fried out of refuse pork. Sometimes wild myrtle ber- 
ries were stewed until they yielded a pale green wax, 



which made beautiful and aromatic candles. The oil 
of peanuts served also for illuminating purposes. 
When none of these were to be had the resinous pine 
— "fat pine" -was cut into splinters and burned one 
at a time, while the overworked women sat around 
the dickering light and sewed until late in the night. 

1 once -aw five soldiers' wives making clothes by 
this light, and while they worked they talked over the 
chances of their "men" coming home alive. "I don't 
expect mine." said 1 me. "hut God knows 1 do not want 
tn complain. Since my baby died he hasn't any occa- 
sion to ciinie." By "occasion " she meant inducement. 

During all tin-, laborious occupations the children 
had t" he clothed, generally without the assistance of 

a sewing machine; they must he watched, led. taught 
and disciplined. Night schools were established in 
the basements of the churches, where the ragged chil- 
dren were taught by the young ladies. 

Great barrels of snap were made of the refuse of the 
hogs killed fur family and plantation use. Was toilet 
snap required the need was supplied each time that a 
home-cured ham was boiled for family use. and the 
old-fashioned sweet flowers and herbs nt' the garden 
furnished the perfume. 

The principal t' 1 in every house was pork or corned 

beef. The meat was cured under the supervision of 
the ladies of the family, and hams, sausages and 
"sparerihs" were prepared in the most dainty manner. 
Pork, sugar, sorghum molasses, corn-meal, fowls, eggs, 
butter —every thing produced on the plantation — were 
exchanged with grocers for other commodities. Any 
surplus of cotton, buttons, and such like drapers' 
stores, were exchanged in the same way. 

A few sauces were invented tn add zest tn our poor 
fare, and some of these have been accepted by the world 
of gourmets. Wine was made of elderberries, bitter 
oranges, or wild cherries. 

Hundreds of gallons of blackberry brandy were 
manufact ured and sent to the hospitals for the soldiers. 

mi; COFFEE AND TEA. 

[n order that the wounded might have tea and cof- 

, fee. "substitutes" were made for home use of sassafras 

leaves, balm, Or sage, and even orange leaves, were 

steeped in hot water sweetened with sorghum molasses. 
For coffee parched sweet potato shavings, parched corn 
or wdieat, and parched carrots, were used. 

All the coffee, tea, white or brown sugar, and every 
other scarce luxury, was sent to the soldiers. "Real 

Coffee and sure enough tea" wire for the sick and 
wounded, imt for people in health. 

The strong tension upon the nerves of the women 
was not relieved by pleasant new hooks or magazines. 
The newspapers were annals of ardent endeavor, some 
triumphs, hut also of sorrow, wounds and death. 

All work and no play began to tell upon our nerv- 
ously organized women. Some of them turned for 
relief when any of I he soldiers were home for reunions, 
called, from the absence of any refreshments save cold 
water, "starvation parties." To these came the young 
officers, who danced as gaily as though there were no 
serried ranks of the enemy confronting them to do 
battle to the death, perhaps, on the morrow. There 
were charades, private theatricals and tableaux. < >ne 
lovely young woman, who has since bloomed into an 
authoress of much renown, personated a marble Xiobe 
embracing her stricken children, and the sculptors of 
antiuuitv have left us no more beautiful statue. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



149 



0TJK HOSPrTAL NURSES. 

The hospital nurses were largely women, and mostly 
ladies. What they did is recorded in the "Book of 
Life,'' but mortal pen would fail to depict their loving 
service amidst the horrors of military hospitals near 
the battlefields. The food was generally prepared by 
private families; delicate breads, strung broths, or 
ounces of the precious "real tea and coffee" were daily 
taken in baskets, and the soothing voices of the nurses 
could be heard whispering hopes of victory and home, 
or murmuring comforting texts from the Scriptures, 
while the sufferers were fed or cooling lotions poured 
upon the dressing of their wounds. I wish it were 
possible to give the names of these devoted women 
who administered to the wounded, soothed the dying, 
and received the little tokens and messages for their 
absent families. The list would be too long here, but 
their names are household words in every Southern 
home — and "when shall their glory fade? 

HOW DEFEAT WAS BORNE. 

How can justice be rendered to the wives of the 
common soldiers? On those women fell the burden 
of deprivation unheard of. In silence they sowed and 
reaped the land, clothed and tended their children. 
buried them when they sank under want and exposure, 
or themselves laid down in solitude and died. 

It was the exception when the men in the field 
knew the trials to which their wives were subjei ted. 
The women were vocal in hope, silent in despair. The 

wives of the common soldiers labored and sorrowed 
without the expectation of earthly honor or eclal 
For if the men of their household perished in battle 
it was only "collective glory'' acquired for the army, 
for their cause, not for themselves; a nameless grave 
their share. 

When the last sad days of the struggle drew nigh 
and every heart was cast down, (In 1 women were the 
most cheerfifl. When the young and old non-com- 
batants were summoned to man the trenches then 1 
were no tears and repinings. Such preparations as 
were practicable for the comfort of the aged or infirm 
citizen guards were quietly made, and the men were 
dispatched with as much cheer as trembling lips could 
summon. 

At last, when Gen, Lee's half-starved army must be 
withdrawn from before the overwhelming forte of the 
enemy, he sent an officer to inform Mr. Davis of the 
fact. The message was delivered in St. Paul's Church 
during morning service, where the President had gone 
to pray for his people. The congregation divined the 
purport of the dispatch, and though they expected, as 
the outcome of it, that their homes would be burned 
and the city laid waste, there was no panic, no plea 
for protection. The women gathered about Mr. Davis 
and said: "Leave us to our fate if you can save the 
country. Perhaps some time you may win Richmond 
back; but if not, we know you have done your best. 
ami you must not grieve over us." In this spirit our 
women met defeat, starvation, labor, humiliation, and 
all the heart-rending conditions of "reconstruction." 

The placid, gray-haired matrons of to-day have cov- 
ered with decorous pride the scars of that dread strug- 
gle, but they are no less veteran conquerors in a mor- 
tal conflict in which every noble aspiration and human 
effort was called forth, and answered with a cheerful 
" ail sum/" 



MEMORIAL DAY— ITS ORK-IX. 



MRS. GEO. T. FRY, CHATTANOOGA, TENX. 



It is a matter of history that Mrs. ( 'has. J. Williams. 
of Columbus, Ga., instituted the beautiful custom of 
decorating soldiers' graves with flowers, a custom 
which has been adopted throughout the United States. 
Mrs. Williams was the daughter of Maj. John Howard, 
of Milledgeville, Ga., and was a superior woman. She 
married Maj. C. -1. Williams on his return from the 
Mexican War. As Colonel of the First Georgia Reg- 
ulars, of the army in Virginia, he contracted disease. 
from which he died in 1862, and was buried in Colum- 
bus. ( ia. 

Mis. Williams and her little girl visited his grave 
every day. and often comforted themselves by wreath- 
ing it with flowers. While the mother sat abstract- 
edly thinking of the loved and lost one. the little one 
would pluck the weeds from the unmarked soldiers" 
graves near her father's and cover them with flowers, 

tailing them her soldiers' graves. 

Aftera short while the dear little girl was summoned 
by the angels to join her father. The sorely bereaved 
mother then took charge oi these unknown graves for 
the child's sake, and as she cared tor them thought of 
the thousands of patriot graves throughout the South, 
faraway from home ami kindred, and 111 this way the 
plan was suggested to her of setting apart one day in 
each year, that love might pay tribute to valor through- 
out the Southern States. In March. 1866, -be ad- 
dressed a communication to the Columbus Times, an 
extract of which I give : 

"We beg the assistance of the press and the ladies 
throughout the South to aid us in the effort to set 
apart a certain day to be observed from the Potomac 
to tie Rio Grande, and to be banded down through 
time as a religious custom of the South, to wreathe 
the graves of our martyred dead with flowers, and we 
propose the 26th day of April as the day." 

She then w rote to the Soldiers' Aid Societies in every 
Southern State, ami they readily responded ami re- 
organized under the name of Memorial Associations. 
She lived long enough to see her plan adopted all over 
the South, and in 1868 throughout the United States. 
Mrs. William- died April 15, 1874, and was buried 
with military honors. On each returning Memorial 
Lay the Columbus military march around her grave, 
and each deposits a floral offering. 

The Legislature of Georgia, in 1866, set apart the 
26th day 'if April as a legal holiday in obedience to 
her re. plot. Would that every Southern State ob- 
served the same day. 



GEN. W. I.. CABELL, of Pallas, Texas, sends to the 

Baltimore Sun a roster of the surviving Generals of the 

Confederate Army, compiled from the most reliable 
data to be had to October 1, 1892. The number of 
general officers of all grades appointed and com- 
missioned was four hundred and ninety-eight. One 
hundred and two rose to the rank of Major-General, 
and twenty-one rose to the rank of Lieutenant-Gen- 
eral. Ceneral Joseph E. Johnston, six Major-Generals, 
and twenty-two Brigadier-Generals are reported in 
1891-2. One hundred and sixty-six Generals survive. 

Payette (Miss.) Chronicle: "We desire to commend 
it to every Confederate soldier, and to all others in- 
terested in them and their affairs." 



15° 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



ONLY A ER1YATE. 



SAVED FROM A FEDERAL PRISON. 



BY CAPT. K. W. DAI 



Only a private! bis jacket "f pray 
I- Btaini '1 by the smoke and the 'lust; 

\b Bayard, he 8 bravi ; ae Rupert, he's gay; 

Reckless ae Murat in beat of tin- fray: 
But in i .'"I is liis only trust. 

Only a private ' to march and to fight, 

To Buffer and starve and be strong; 

With knowledge ei gh to know that the might 

Of justice and truth and freedom and riplit, 

In the end, must crush oul the wrong. 

Only a private ! no ribbon or star 
Snail gild with false glory his name! 

So honors for him in braid or in har, 

His Legion of Honor is only a scar, 
And Ins wounds are his roll of fame! 

< inly a private! one more hero slain 

< >n tin- field lies silent ami chill ! 

Ami in the far South a wife prays in vain 

i me clasp of the band she may ne'er clasp again, 

< )ne kiss from the lips that are still. 

• inly a private! there let him sleep! 

He will nee<l no tablet nor stone ; 
For the mosses anil vines o'er his grave will creep, 
Anil at night the stars through the clouds will peep 

Ami watch him who lies there alone. 

Only a martyr! who fought and who fell 
I'nknown and unmarked in the strife! 
.Hut still as be lies in his lonely cell 
Angel and Seraph the legend shall tell — 
Such a death is eternal life ! 
'Richmond, la., Oct. 24, 1866. 



< OXEEDERA TE G EX ERA LS. 



A. M. Sea, Jr., of Louisville, Ky.. sends the follow- 
iiiL' carefully prepared list. Correction of any errors 
is requested : 



NAME. 



BOKX. 1IIBI). 

Samuel Cooper. N.Y., June 12, 1798. ...'Cameron, Va., Dec 3. 1876. 

Albert S.Johnston Ky., Feb. 2, 1803 Shiloh, Tenn., April n, 1862 

Kobert E. Lee Va., .Inn. 19, ls"7 Lexington, Va.,tirt. 12, 1870. 



Kobert K. Lee Va., .Inn. 19, Isiit Lexington, Va.,net. 12. 1870. 

Joseph E. Johnston Va., Feb. 8, 1807 Washington, D. C, Mareli 

21, 1891. 
G. T. Beauregard La., May 28, lsis New Orleans, La., Feb. 20, 

1893. 
Braxton Bragg N.C., Mnreh 27, lsi7.iialveston, Texas, Sept. 27, 

1876. 
E. Kirl.v-Snilth Fla., May 16, 1824... Bewanee, Tenn., March 28, 

1898, 

General, Temporary Rank. 

....Ky., June 1, 1811 New Orleans, La., Aug. "in, 

1879. 

Lieutenant uenehai-s. 

s. C., Jan. 8, 1821 .... 
...N. ('., April In, isnt; I'ine .Mountain, Tenn., June 
14, 1864. 

..N. ('., 18in FayettevlUe, N. C, June 20, 

1880. 

..Ga., 1817 Hydesvllle,Va.,Nov.6,1878. 

.Va., Jan. 21, 1*21 liulnea's Station, Va., May 

in, 1868. 

..Pa,, Aug. in, 1814 lvniivn. Pa., July 18, 1881. 

|i. C., Feb.8, 1817 Sprlngneld, Tenn., Jan. 25, 
1872. 

.Va„ Nov. 9. I82. r . Petersburg.Va., April 2, 1865 

..8. C., July 12, 1821.. .Charlotte, N. C, Sept. 23, 
1889. 

Richard Taylor... La., Jan. 27, 1827..... New Xork City, April 12, 

1879. 

Stephen D. Lee s. c... 

Jubal A. Early. Va.. \,,t.. 2, 1816 

Richard n. Anderson. .8. c. 1816 Beaufort, S. C, June 26, 1879. 

Uex. P. Stewart Tenn., Oct. 2, 1821 

Nathan li. Forrest Tenn., July 18, 1821. ..Memphis, Trim., Oct, 29, 

1877. 

Wade Hampton s. c, March 28. 1818. 

Simon B. Buckner Ky., April 1, |sj3 

Joseph Wheeler < la., Sim, t. 10, 1886 

John B. liordon Oa., Feb. 6, 1836 



John B. Hood 



James Longstreet 

Leon Idas Polk 

Thi opb. II. Holmes 

\\ llllam J. Hardee... 
Thomas J. Jackson. 

loh ii i . Pemberton. 

Rli ii trd s. Ewell 

\ in brose P. Hill 

Di i ii. inn 



As well as I remember ii was in L863, and outline 
confronted Federals on the Rapadan in Virginia. All 
being quiet, the two great armies were taking a rest, 
lmt were preparing to spring upon each other at a mo- 
ment's notice. I was ordered to take my company, 
which \\:e- Company I. Fourteenth North Carolina 
troops, 'and relieve our advance pickets. In taking 
command of the line 1 found that the soldiers of both 
sides had become quite free with each other in friendly 
exchange of papers, coffee ami tobacco, and a game of 
cards t<> pass the time. The officer whom I relieved 
i informed me thai he and his men had made arrange- 
ments for exchange of courtesies next morning, in- 
structions came to nie that evening to have no com- 
munication with the enemy, anil to lire on them if 
they showed themselves in our front. Here came a 
temptation to surprise, kill and capture quite a num- 
ber of them, thereby, perhaps, winning promotion and 
commendation from commanding officers: but a small 
still voice whispered to me in the silent hours of our 
lonely watch that night to give the enemy a chance 
for their Lives before slaughtering them in cold blood. 
My sense of justice and honor decided in their favor. 
At daylight next morning a horseman rode from the 
woods in our front and dashed straight for my [ticket 
post, where I was surrounded by six brave soldiers 
armed with good and trusty rifles, and my lines ex- 
tended on either side ready for action at the command. 
Many unarmed private soldiers followed close in the 
wake of the horseman loaded with papers, coffee, etc., 
for exchange. The horseman rode up in a few paces 
of my post and came to a halt, at the same time cry- 
ing out, " Here is your papers, and I have a canteen of 
whisky for Col. Lee, of North Carolina, who was in 
West Point with me. 1 am Gen. Custer." He and 
his men were then as completely in the power of my 
men as he was when surrounded by the savage Indians 
who unmercifully slew him and his companions in 
arms. I did not give the command to (ire and close 
from right and left upon them, but I ordered one of 
my soldiers to tell him our orders changed in the 
night, and I would give him one chance for his life, 
and that was retreat in haste, or I would he compelled 
to lire, though they were unarmed and defenseless. 
He turned and rode away oul of my sight that day 
and forever, and I soon had good cause to thank (Jod 
for letting him go unharmed. In the fall of 1864, at 
the battle of Cedar Creek, "the ba'ttle of Gen. Sheri- 
dan's famous twenty miles ride," I was shot through 
my lungs while leading the gallant Second Regiment 
of North Carolina troops in the morning charge. I 
was left that night in a private house in Straslmrg by 
my friends as mortally wounded. 1 fell into ithe 
hands of Vermont troops, ( !ol. Foster's regiment, Brig.- 
Gen. Grant's brigade, and by their kindness was per- 
mitted to write to Gen. Custer, who was at Washing- 
ton at the time, I never received an answer, lmt one 
day Gen. Grant's Adjutant Genera] came into my 
room and informed me that I would not get a letter 
from Gen. < luster, but I was to be left within our lines 
when they fell hack, which took place in about three 
weeks, and the friends who had been so kind to me 
came in and told me good-bye, and bid me go home 
to my young wife I had married a short time before, 
who was thinking of me as dead. Tiios. B. Beal. 

.Salisbury, N. C. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



151 



"MISTIS." 



Of all extraordinary myths and illusions over cher- 
ished, the popular idea of those in the North and East 
of the case and luxrious idleness of Southern women 
is the most delusive. 

Not of the "new'" South do I write, hut of the ante- 
bellum days of slavery. 

The most painstaking, indefatigable workers, mental 
and physical, the world ever knew were the wives and 
daughters Of the Southern planter. 

This statement may sound paradoxical nevertheless 
it cannot be gainsaid. 

Take, for example, a cotton plantation of lour hun- 
dred slaves, the master had hi.- assistant or overseer, 
whose duty was to superintend the outdoor work of 
the field hands: but the master was QO sluggard, he 
arose at dawn, and sometimes steadily pursued his 
work of general superintendence tar into the night. 

The mistress had more exhaustive duties still. She 
was the head and front of business. In her hands 
lay a heavy and a fearful responsibility. She was at 
once at the head of the sanitary and commissary de- 
partments. 

The master tilled the large square smoke-house with 
provisions. "Mistis" carried the key. No planter's 
wife ever surrendered that scepter of power, the smoke- 
house kev. It was she who saw thai provisions were 
plentifully and justly dealt out. She saw that her 
people were well clad as well as well fed, and other- 
wise made comfortable. 

Think of the amount of clothing required tor four 
hundred people, and not a garment bought ready 
made and not a sewing machine in the land ' 

The material was bought by the hale, cut into shape 
and made up. The planter's wife had to superintend. 
Ofttimes cut, arrange and sew. No one could teach 
negro seamstresses but "mistis." Every detail, every 
preparation, and always the button holes, were left for 
her tired hands. 

Outside of this responsibility and monotonous labor 
it was "mistis" who was called up at midnight to 
minister to some sufferer in the quarter. 1 1' not mn\ ed 
by that beautiful charity so inherent in the heart- of 
women, another very important impetus urged careful 
attendance upon sick slaves — negroes were not neg- 
lected. Losing a " field hand" was equivalent to los- 
ing fifteen hundred or two thousand gold dollars, 
therefore medical attention was prompt and efficient. 
A physician was often miles away, therefore "mistis" 
sometimes practiced medicine — her store room was 
also her drug store. Blue mass and quinine were her 
fovorite medicines, though paregoric, epsom salts and 
"number six" played quite an important part, hard 
and molasses was her infallible remedy for croup and 
had colds. On the intelligence, energy and benevo- 
lence of " mistis " much depended. 

The plantation was altogether one vast family. 
The only seeming drone in this busy hive was the 
black mammy, who, though she toiled not with her 
hands, she, too, had her responsibilities, for to her 
were confided the children of her master. To her 
loyal heart this trust was as beautiful as it was sacred. 
The children were taught to respect and obey her, and 
she in turn gave her whole life to their welfare and 
happiness, I know of one Southern statesman whose 
home holds many rare and valuable pictures, hut the 



most appreciated of all is the life size crayon of a w it h- 
ered, black face — his mammy, whom he now cares for 
witli a son's devotion. 

On the plantation the slaves had comfortable dwell- 
ings in the quarter in sight and hearing of the plant- 
er's residence. The quarter was two long streets cross- 
ing each other midway. Each dwelling boasted a 
flower yard in trout and vegetable garden in the rear. 
The plantation church Stood a litth way hack, and all 

were required to attend services on Sunday. There 
was very little friction on a well-ordered plantation. 
Well-fed negroes are usually contented; their careless 
temperaments, reckless of to-morrow's weal or wee. are 
easily satisfied. 

The " mistis" of the quarter, the medical and cloth- 
ing departments, was also "mistis" of the kitchen. 

The -. crets of culinary success were taught by that in- 
exorable teacher, experience; for verily there's no 
royal road to the mysteries of the BUCCessful COnCOC- 

tion of dainf 

The purest and best training for boys and girls was 
on th<' ante-bellum plantation. From the teachings 
of a well-chosen governess, or from neighborhood 

schools, they had first a solid literary training- -though 
still under mammy's argUS eve. 

Within the home circle "mistis" reigned supreme. 
With the refining influence of her social jurisdiction, 

with hooks and music and (hovers, with carefully 
chosen companions, she developed the character- of 
her daughters and son- into the beauty and chivalry 
of the South. Her life was concentrative in its aim's 
and efforts, and every one within the radius of her in- 
fluence was the better for it. 

Plantation life, with its hearty, open-handed hos- 
pitality, the old-time Southern "mistis" entertaining 
with gentle grace and dignity, are things worthy of 
remembrance. 

" .Mistis" was the authority, the oracle of the pla 
tion. It was sin who ua- appealed to for favors, she 

who praised or scolded, -he who stood between the 
offender and the overseer's wrath. 

Ask some old-time plantation darky who in slavery 
time- was his best friend. My word tor it. his dim old 
eyes will brighten as. ill a Hash of memory, he see> the 
crowning joy of the old home, and he will answer, 
with a smile, " Mistis." — Mrs. C. C. Scott, in Arkansas 

Triir 

'fin: Camp at Portsmouth. \'a.. is making extensive 
preparations for a celebration on unveiling the new 
monument. The last two statues are soon to he p] 
iii position. At the recent reunion of the Camp the 

following officials were elected: Col. H. ('. Hudgins, 
Commander: Cant. -las. H. Toomer, Second Com- 
mander; 1,. P. Slater. Third Commander: .1. Thos. 
Dunn, Adjutant; W. s. Langhorne, Quartermaster; 
Dr. Jas. Parrish, Surgeon ; John C. Ashton, Paymaster; 
Williamson Smith. Sargeant-Major ; He v. .1. I). Powell. 
Chaplain; John H. Hume, Memher of Hoard of Visit- 
ors Soldiers' Home at Richmond; Josh. Denly, Videt. 

Goon Money for Old Postace Stamps. — Look over your old 
letters, and if you find any witli Confederate stamps on issued 
by postmasters of Nashville, Knoxville, Memphis, Livingston, 
New Orleans, Baton Rouge, or any other southern city, send 
the letter or envelope, with stamp on (do not pull it off), to P. 
II; Hill, 408 Union Sheet, Nashville, Tenn, and he will pay 
you from 50 cents to $10 for each stamp, according to its worth. 
Collections of stamps purchased. 



152 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



STORY OF FIVE PRIVATES. 



"The warrior's bannei t ;i k. s its flight 
To greet the warrior's Bonl." 

It was in the early days of '61, jusl after the press- 
ing call fur volunteers rang over the South, that the 
hock of contending armies closed in the death- 
grapple which was to last for tour awful years, and 
when volunteers for the armies of Virginia seemed 
almost to sign their death warrants as they mustered 
for tlif fray. Nothing daunted, the boys of the Con- 
federacy, from Maryland to Texas, rushed forward to 
the defense of their beloved Southland. With all the 
chivalry and dauntless courage that has ever marked 
their race they sprung forward to the contest, and 
wen- ever ready to even die when duty called. 

When the first regiment from South Carolina 
_- was ordered to Virginia, one evening just be- 
fon leaving Charleston, then' as.scmhled in one of the 
most refined and charming houses in this old city by 
tli' sea, a party of young fellow volunteers of this reg- 
iment, representatives of some of the best families of 
this State. They had come to hid adieu to the young 
ladies of thi house, whose brother was one of their 
number. Their ages ranged from seventeen to nine- 
teen. They were bright, huoyant spirits, with high 
hopes ami noble aspirations, whom even the dangers 
and uncertainties of the future could not tame The 
tender mother and devoted, trembling sisters, filled 
with -ad forebodings that this might he the last meet- 
ing for some of them, at least, yet they nerved them- 
selves with fortitude to the terrible ordeal, and not a 
word was spoken to shake the determination of the 
young soldiers in the holy cause that called them forth. 
Willi firmest faith in the justice of their cause, and 
that Cod would do what was lust, they surrendered 

them at their country's Call, hade them farewell with 
sad hut hopeful faces, ami not until they had gone 
upon the long, dai-k journey from which hut one ever 
returned, did they weep over the departure of their 
loved ones. 

The following extract from an address hy Charles- 
ton's gifted orator, Col. James Armstrong, who was 
with them in the fight and saw what he relates, will 
best give the last scene in the hloody drama of which 
the above sketch gives the first, and which recounts 
the splendid hearing and the death of four of these 
five young friends: 

"That old Roman, Maxey Gregg, orders his brigade 
to charge, and with a yell that awakes the slumbering 
echoes of meadow ana 'stream, they press irresistably 
along. The chivalrous Col. A. M. Smith falls mor- 
tally wounded, and the blue Hag of South Carolina, 
which he told his men to die by but never let trail, 
wavers; for the hoy hero, James Taylor, who bore it, 
had his breast fatally pierced by a bullet after being 
twice fatally wounded. It. is for but a moment, for 
the daring young Shuhrick Hayne takes it from his 
dying grasp, and again it floats on high. Alas! he 
too, falls to the earth to rise no more. It is now in 
the hands of the youthful but fearless Alfred Pinck- 
ney, hut soon it drops from his nerveless grasp as he 
falls mortally wounded across the body of his friends. 
Then the fourth, Gadsden Holmes, sprang forward to 
rescue it, but fell pierced with seven halls before he 
reached the Hag. It does not touch the earth, for an- 



other hero rushes from the ranks of the color company 

and takes the tailing standard, and again the Palmetto 
rustles in the breeze held by the stalwart arms of the 
lion-hearted Dominick Speliman, who bore it through 
the light. Many others perished beneath the wither- 
ing flame, hut the column moved victoriously on. and 

after a most stubborn and bl ly resistance the enemy 

retreated, and the danger that menaced the capital of 
the Confederacy disappeared with the setting sun." 
Another authority relating the same incident say-: 
"The most touching and pathetic incident concerning 
this class of youthful heroes is that of the defense of 
their flag by some of the hoys of Col. Gregg's regi- 
ment of South Carolina volunteers on the battlefield 
of Caine's Mill. Va. * Thus in a few minutes 

were offered upon the altar of their country live as 
noble spirits as ever graced the annals of any history." 
The fifth of the party. Lieut. Ingrahani Hasel, a 
nephew of Commodore 1'. N. Ingrahani. passed safely 
through the fight, and after the battle assisted in bury- 
ing his dead comrades, and marked the spot on which 
they fell. They now lie in Carolina soil. He passed 
through the war from the tiring on the Star of the 
W'e-t to the surrender at Appomattox, then in com- 
mand of Company A. sharpshooters of brigade. He 
was only once wounded — at Sharpsburg— although he 
passed through many battles. His record is one of the 
most remarkable of the war. Palmetto. 

Charleston, S. ('. 

FOR THE DAVis MONUMENT. 



Lynchburg, Tenn., April 4, 1893. 
Enclosed you will find check for $25.00, presented 
by the Merrymakers, a social club of ladies of our 

town, as their mite to the Monumental Fund for Jef- 
ferson Davis. The money is the proceeds of an enter- 
tainment given by the club three years ago by request 

of W ly B.Taylor Bivouac, to assist in erecting a 

monument in our town to the memory of the ( 'on fed- 
erate dead of our county, Moore. From some cause 
they tailed to carry out their design, so we gladly give 
it for a monument that will stand as a memorial of 
every Southern boy who fell wearing the gray. While 
M r. I (avis deserves a monument as a noble man among 
men, a hero and a martyr, we feel that the marble 
that will be erected over his sacred dust will thus fitly 
memorialize our lost hut jusl and ever dear cause. 
We regret that our donation is not ten times as large, 
for we would he glad to sec a monument as solid and 
lasting as the pyramids of Egypt, * * * a fit 
emblem of the ones erected in the hearts of every true 
man and woman of our sunny South, to a cause made 
dear and sacred hy the blood of her hrave sons and the 
tears of her loving daughter-. 

Wishing to join hands with our sister women work- 
ing so earnestly in this cause, and wishing it a glori- 
ous success, we are. |{e pectfulh . 

Miss Rosa Gordon, President. 

Mrs. It. E. L. Moi'ntcastle, V. Pres. 

Miss Nannie Salmon, Sec. and Treas. 



Soutiiern Historical Society Papers Wanted. — Vol. VII. 
No. 12 (December, 1879), and Vol. X. Nos. 8 to 12 (August to 
December, 1882), of the Southern Historical Society Papers, 
are wanted to complete a set, and can be disposed of to ad- 
vantage by addressing P. 0. Box 274, Richmond, Va. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



[ 53 



STRANGE INCIDENTS OF THE WAR. 



"Oh, brandy, brandy, bane oi life! 
Spring of tumult, source of strife, 
Could I but hall thy curses tell, 
The wise would wish liiee safe at bell." 
( A'o( i Tt mpi rand btory • 

During the early months of 1m'>:', our command was 
in camps on Big Black river, about twenty miles be- 
Low Vicksburg. Lieut. Persons and myself were or- 
dered to go to Fort Pemberton, at the mouth of Y> I- 
lowbousha River, to attend to some important busi- 
ness. On our return night overtook us at a little vil- 
lage in tin- central portion of Mississippi, called 
Aconna. There was no hotel or public place of enter- 
tainment in the village, so we rode up to a family res- 
idence and asked for a nights lodging. Learning that 
we wore soldiers, the kind lady bade us welcome, had 
our horses cared for, and invited us into a room in 
which burned a pleasant lire. Supper was soon an- 
nounced, and during the meal the lady, without 
seeming to be inquisitive, learned from us that we 
were from Texas, that we were members of the cav- 
alry battalion of Wauls Texas Legion, that we had 
been to Fort Pemberton on business, and were now on 
our return to our command. After supper we again 
seated ourselves In 'tore the cheerful fire, and were soon 
joined by the lady of the house and her three chil- 
dren, two beautiful flaxen-haired girls, one about 
eight and the other about ten years of age. The 
third was a bright, rosy-cheeked hoy, perhaps four or 
five years old. I soon had the young gentleman on 
my knee, and with a little prompting from his mother, 
learned from him that his father's name was ('apt. 
Johnson; that he was in (ien. Johnston's army, hut 
had not been heard from tor months. 

The next morning we hid adieu to Mrs. Johnson 
and her children, but could not prevail on her to re- 
' reive any pay for our nights lodging. We returned 
and rejoined our command, hut when we arrived at 
our camps 1 had a raging fever, and soon discovered 
that I had the mumps in addition to typhoid fever. 
My command was ordered to take up the line of 
march for Tennessee, and with one of my friends to 
nurse and take care of me I was left behind. After 
forty days of suffering I felt aide to ride, and after 
providing myself with the necessary papers, we 
started to timi the command. Arriving at Vicksburg, 
we put up at the Washington Hotel for the night I 
felt the need of a stimulant, and above all things 1 
wished for a drink of peach brandy. I sent my com- 
rade out in town and directed him to pay any price 
for peach brandy, hut he tailed to find any. and we 
left the city without it. After a few day« travel we 
arrived at Aconna. the residence of Mrs. Johnson. I 
was yet wishing for peach brandy, and imagined that 
one drink of it would do me more good than all oi 
the medicine 1 could take. As we neared the little 
village I told my comrade that I must call and pay my 
respects to the lady who had been so kind to me. 
She welcomed me as she would an old-time friend, in- 
sisted that 1 was unfit for duty as a soldier, and said 
if 1 would remain a week she would take care of me 
and try to lit me for active soldier life. Hut I wa- de- 
termined to goon and try to find my command, al 
though 1 was yet quite feeble. When 1 arose to Kid 
Mrs. Johnson adieu she remarked, " Wait a minute." 
and went into an adjoining room. In a few minutes 



she reappeared with a bottle in her hand, and said: 
"Here is a bottle of good peach brandy of our own 
make; use it cautiously and it will do yon good." I 
would willingly have paid fifty dollars for it. but she 
seemed to read my thoughts as 1 went to draw my 
purse. "No," she said, "use it as medicine, and 1 
hope yon may soon recover and make, as 1 believe 
you will, a g 1 soldier." 1 used the brandy as di- 
rected. 1 recovered. 1 found my command and was 
soon engaged in active service, but nothing could re- 
move from my mind the image of Mrs. Johnson and 
her children. 

'ldic war continued, and in September 1 was made a 
prisoner, -pent a fevi days in tin' [rvin Block at Mem- 
phis, Tenn.. then was sent up the river to Alton, 111. 
Here 1 had -mall-pox, ami in March following, with 
others, was sent to that earthly hell. Fort Delaware. 
After months of untold suffering the hospital steward 
(Conkling) ordered me to take charge of Ward No. 9 
a- ward master. It was an agreeable change. 1 could 
now keep clean and free from "grey hacks." 1 at 
once began to form the acquaintance of my patients. 
( Mi one of the ward hunks a tine looking middle aged 
soldier was reclining, and at the head of his bunk the 

letters, ■■ Johnson, Mississippi Infantry." 

1 immediately enquired for particulars, and from him 
learned that he was then Colonel of the Missis- 
sippi Regiment, that his home was Aconna. Miss., 
where he had. when last heard from, a wife and three 
children ; that he was -hot and captured in Tennessi e 
and could not sleep or rest without an opiate or stim- 
ulant of some kind: that he thought if he could have 

a drink of brandy at night he would he able to sleep 
and rest. And here before me was the husband of 
tin' lady who had once been so kind to me. more than 
a thousand miles from home ami family, a prisoner, 
and suffering for the same stimulant i hat his wife hail 
once so kindly given me. I was permitted to keep 
brandy in the ward room, hut not to give it out with- 
out a doctor's prescription, under severe penalty. 
Hut if Col. Johnson did not rest and sleep well there- 
; 1 1 1 < r it wa- not for want 'if a drink of brandy. 

Old < J hay. 

( .ai kijmm. the story of t he hat tie of Franklin, pub- 
lished in th. April Veteran, the Nashville American 

says : 

Although Written as the experience ot a hoy with a 

gun in his hand, it has been accepted so generally 
that nearly every leading daily in the South lias copied 
it. and the Rev. Dr. Field, of New York, makes it the 
of a chapter of liftv pages in his splendid his- 
tory of fours through the South. 

In the most concise manner possible the writer tells 
the story of how the Confederates made way through 
tie obstructions and leaped over the stupendous 
breastworks^gainst whizzing hullets and fixed bayon- 
ets. Then how the enemy pressed their way back 
mi tin neutral ground between the breastworks, the 
Cartel' residence and other places of protection near 
by. Mr. Cunningham pays high tribute to Oen. 0. F. 
Strahl, his brigadier, who stood in the entrenchment 
and handed up guns to him and others until nearly 
all the men and the General too were shot down. 
Recently, while in Kansas, he visited Mrs. Sigler, a 
sister of Gen. Strahl. who gave him the use for a time 
of his diary and many of the private papers which 
had been preserved by the General. 



154 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



THE TEXAS REUNION AT HOUSTON. 



i. Will Lambert, Commander of Dick Dowling 
Camp, U. ( . \'.. :ii Houston, Texas, writes a.- follows 

under ■laic of May l. 189 
"We had a grand three-days reunion of tin- United 
federate Veterans in this city last month— 20th, 
21st, and 22d closing the last 'lay with an old-fash- 
ioned Southern barbecue. It would have done your 

In-art g 1 to have been with the 'boys' ami heard 

i more tin old 'rebel yell,' as the soul-stirring 

notes "i' • Dixie' ami ' The Bonnie I slue Flag' floated 
out upon tin- -nft Soul h breezes. 

"Maj. Hannibal II. Boone, one of the most gifted 
speakers in all the Southland, delivered a soul-stirring 
speech at the barbecue grounds, and brought out the 
grandest enthusiasm. The address was replete with 

rvative but manh refei ss to the past; no beg- 
ging the issue, but brilliant and touching refen nces 
to what we did do under the 'Stars and Bars,' and 
what we can do under the Stars and Stripes. Many 
of his words fell with telling effect upon the 'Boys in 
Blue' who ware present. A one-armed New Jersey 
veteran occupied a seat mi the platform, and as Maj. 
Boone poured hot shut into the ranks of the fraudu- 
lent pensioner! — 'wagon yard bummers who trot shot 
stealing hogs'— this maimed yankee, who lost his 
right arm at Chancellorsville, was the most enthusi- 
astic applauder of all the live thousand present. The 
speech throughout was a gem. 

•'The re-election nf ex-llnv. Sul. Ross, 'the Little 
Cavalryman.' to be Major General of the Division of 
Texas for the ensuing year, caused one of the grand- 
est oration- I ever witnessed. His election was made 
by acclamation and a rising vote, and when the two 
thousand old Confederates rose up to proclaim their 
vote- the 'ayes' fairly -ho.,k the rafters of the City 
Hall. Bui this scene was 'not a marker' to that 
which followed when the committee on notification 

ed Gen. Ross into the hall. The 'hoys' went 
wild with shouts of welcome; hats flew up to the 
ceiling, handkerchiefs were waved, and the enthu- 
siasm was caught up by the large number of ladies 
present, only to make the veterans more enthusiastic. 
'The Little Cavalryman' was visibly aflcctcd in this 
demonstration of love and admiration by the old sol- 
diers, many of whom he had led into the very jaws of 
death. Verily, Sul. Ross is a greal favorite with all 

Texans— and he should he. lie is their friend, as 

ttUe a- the needle to the pole. 

''Please send me some subscription blanks a can- 
vasser's outfit, as it were. I will detail my 'rebel 
daughter,' as some call her, to work up a good list of 
subscribers to the Confederate Veteran among the 
members of our camp. I wish you tin; abundant suc- 
cess whi< h your splendid publication merits." 



MOUTALI.V WOUNDED. 



Among all the thrilling incidents, hair-breadth es- 
cape- and deeds of valor that have been published, I 

have never -ecu where any old vet. has acknowledged 

lmw had he was scared "durin" the war, so I conic to 
the front ami tell my truthful story. How ignorant 
we wen- in the beginning about war! I fully believed 
I could whip live yank.- before breakfast, and was 
afraid the war would he over before I could try my 
hand. Whole regiments were armed with long shop- 



made knives and old "pepperbox" pistols, expecting 
a hand to hand fight. Rut tomyi-tory. I had served 
in the Virginia army, had been discharged from inju- 
ries received, ami had re-in listed just in lime to go 

through the <; 'gia campaign under Johnston and 

Hood. So ymi can imagine whether I had a chance 
to. kill a yank or not. One of those foggy, gloomy 
mornings in June, 1864, not far from New Hope 
Church, 1 was on vnlet. All old vets know lmw peril- 
ous the moment the fog would rise, or daylight come. 
It was similar to turkey-hunting, waiting to -, ■,- how 
oot. All still. No cheering commands or mar- 
tial mu.-ic or rebel veils. ,\ shot up or down the line 
would ring out am) some poor fellow would cross the 
river. I was hiding behind my pile of rocks in an 
old field with gun in position. To my right I saw a 

bright Enfield poked around another pile of rock- hut 
a short distance away. < )f course I changed position, 
bul only to he in range of another yankee on my left 
behind his pile of rocks. Imagine the situation. Re- 
treat, I considered, was the better pari of valor. On 
my hands and knees I began to craw). No Bhot was. 
tired until 1 reached an open space some two hundred 
yards wide, and in the woods was a line of works held 
by our skirmishers. < )n 1 went with all possible speed. 
How I wished for wings to fly! Zip! zip! the bullets 
would pass — a thudding sound. 1 was certainly struck. 
1 glanced down and saw that my pants were red to my 

boot tops. I could feel the blood in my I ts, but no 

time to make examination. A solid blue line was 
yelling behind me. Completely faint and exhausted. 
1 rolled over the works only to find my canteen shot 
through and my sorghum all wasted mi my pants and 
in my 1 ts. 

Thanks to the God of battle, I have been permitted 
to live and raise a large family, and will expect to 
meet many of the old country veteran- at Birming- 
ham in July. (' imp Bee. 

Forney, Texa». 

Vic Reinhardt, Terrell, Texas : I have been much 
pleased with the Veteran. 1 like its conservative, 
manly position on all matters. Our Camp is doing 
splendidly (J. E. 1'.. Stewart. No. 15). We haveaboul 
1 10 members, and they are from nearly every Southern 
State — from Alabama, Arkansas. Missouri, Louisiana, 
Florida, Mississippi. Georgia, North and South Caro- 
lina, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee and Maryland. 
All are represented in our (amp, with also a goodly 
proportion of Texas veterans. I see a great deal about 
engagements in the Army of Tennessee, and these im- 
press me especially as my four years were spent mainly 
from Mississippi to North Carolina and Kentucky. 
We have always been especially proud of our regi- 
ment, the 25tli Alabama Infantry. Many will remem- 
ber the old Ihej- when we looked at it the last time at 
Greensboro, K, ('. I accompanied my company (C) 
from the organization at fort Gaines in '61 until its 
surrender, and to think of the trying ordeals through 
which we passed is too greal to grasp atone time. 1 
would like to sec an article from some ready writer of 
the old brigade, who passed through Shiloh, Mur- 
frec-boro, Chickamauga, and the various engage- 
ments until we reorganized in North Carolina, with 
not enough men out of the whole brigade for a small 
company. 

We have all the shirt measures from all persons we have 
made shirts for in ten years, ami can duplicate same with any 
changes ordered. Vanderbilt Shirt Co., Nashville, Tenn. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



J 55 



CONFEDERATE DEAD AT OAKWOODS, <III< \G0 



In June, LS91, Gen. John C. Cnderwood was author- 
ized by the ex-Confederate Association of Chicago to 
raise funds with which to erect :i monument at Oak- 
woods Ce tery, in that city. Starting with a nu- 
cleus of $1,500 raised by thai association, through a 
lecture previously given thereby Gen. 
.1. B. Gordon, of Georgia, he, assisted ^ 
by prominent members of the associ- 
ation, has succeeded in raising the 
necessary funds, and has i onl racted 
for tlic erect ion of a handsome mon- 
ument over the Southern dead in Oak- 
w Is < 'emetery. 

A generous response from citizens <>t' 
Chicago resulted, and they subscribed 
8 n i,000 for tin' purpose, There are six 
thousand Confederate dead buried in 
I »:i k \\ Is. 

The monumenl is to be built by 
the Southern Granite Company of 
" Pearl " granite from it- qua 
( lonstitut ion 1 1 ill. ( .a., noted for clear- 
ness "i grain, beauty of texture, ami 
susceptibility of receiving a brilliant 
ami lasting polish. The memorial 
will present a dignified ami imposing 
appearance. 

The lower base or platform is fifteen 
feet six inches square, upon which arc 
laid three other bases; ami. on the 
front of one of them, rut in raised ami 
polished letter- of bold outlines, are 
the words " Confederate 1 >ead " Tie 
upper base is adorned w it h a serii 
rich mouldings, and on the front of 
this stone is placed an enlarged model 
of the well-known Confederate seal, 
worked in bronze, representing in re- 
lid' a mounted soldier (Gen. Wash- 
ington) inclosed within a wreath, 
wrought by entwining the foliage of 
products peculiar to the South. 

The "die'' of tin' monument is 
made of one massh e -tone, the dimen- 
sions being six feet one ince square by 
two feel ten inches high, and has re- 
entering angles whii h are filled with 
croups of cluster columns terminating 
in richly cai \ ed Romanesque caps. 

On the front side, north face, the fol- 
lowing inscription will be worked in 
incised letters upon a polished panel: 
" Erected to the memory of the six 
thousand Confederate soldiers here 

buried, who died in 
Camp Douglas pris- 
on, 1862-65." 

On the other three 
Bides will be placed 
artistic bronze pan- 
els: That on the east 
will represent the "Call to Arms" at the beginning of 
the Confederacy. It is a very striking scene, and that 
relates the story at a glance. Figures representing men 
in various conditions of life, the laborer, artisan, and 
professional man are depicted as they are hastening 



\ 



* 




fr their avocations to enroll for the war. The panel 

on the west will represent the " Lost Cause." [ n the 
foreground of the medallion is an unarmed Confed- 
erate soldier in rude ami picture-, pie garb, leaning on 
a hickory -tail' cut on his return from the "front." 
Hi- attitude reveals deep dejection. He i- gazin" 
upon a dismantled log cabin. 'The broken door lies ex- 
tended across the deserted threshold, 
part of the roof has been carried away 
by a round shot, ami the house in 
which he was cradle,! i- a rum. N, a r 
by lies a discarded cannon and war 
debris, and the sun slowly descending 
in the west, by it- departing ra\ -. 
furnishes an appVopriate setting to the 
pi' tnre and lend- completion t<> I 

ight to be expressed by the 
deft hand of the sculptor. The brot 
on the remaining -id,- of the "die is 

entitled the " Eternal Sleep," and is 
an allegorical representation of the 

Idier who, dying in i 
tivity, is buried 'neath foreign sod. 
"Side by side they sleep the sleep 
that know- no waking" away from 
home ami kindred. To die a prisoner 
in a hostile land, far from all endear- 
ing associations, lends a special hi 
to his heroism. 

An elaborate piece of masonry, or- 
namented with a carved wreath on 
each of its four gables, forms the crown 
to the "die " ami completes the pe h 
tal ; and. from which as a base, spri i 
the -haft two fret six inches squan 
tin- bottom and twelve feet in height, 
surmounted with a finely di signed 
battlemented cap which supports a 
bronze statue of a typical Confederate 
to,.t >ohli, high. 

This 5 true to nature and 

ect in detail, even to thi | 
lie trousers within tin' socks to 
guard against dust a common pi 
ederate i nfantry. 
The figure represents thi soldier 
alter th, surrender, without military 
anus and act out foments, natural in it- 
pose, ami it readily conveys the story 
,,f tic i lonfederate soldier.' 

In addition to the bronze panel-. 
carvings, etc., cannon halls piled as 
military emblems in tic angles of t he 
-c ,>ii,l base, greatly add to the effeel 
The total height of the monument, 
including the statue, is thirty-six feet 
six inch 

The monumenl 
was designed by 
< > e n . I 'mlerwoud. 
the Southern ,,11: 
in command of the 
Northern Divisions 
of the United Confederate Veterans, with Mr. Louis 
li. Fearn as delineating architect. 

Arrangements have been made by and through 
which members of the United Confederate Veterans 
can visit Chicago from Birmingham, Ala., after the 



156 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



meeting there in July next, and I"- present at the un- 
veiling of tli" monument. 

The unveiling will take place "ii Tuesday, July 25, 
and the dedicatory oration will be delivered by 
Senator John B. Gordon, of Georg i, General com- 
manding tip- United Confederate Veterans. 

The excursion will start from Birmingham July 21, 
a. m . stopping at Chattanooga, Cincinnati, Columbus, 
ami Sandusky, Ohio, will remain four days in Chi- 
cago; ami returning via Indianapolis, ImL will make 
tin- circuit w ithin t'-n days. 



IMI'uKTASfE OF OCR LITERATURE. 



ABOUT SOUTHERN BOOKS. 



Sonu Rebel Relics from l/u Seat of War, by Rev. A. T. 
Goodloe, Chapel Hill. Tenn., is the title of a book 
that is now in press at the Southern Methodist Pub- 
lishing House, Nashville, Tenn., Barbee & Smith, 
Agents. 

It is the result, largely, of my being the Chairman 
of the Historical Committee of John I.. McEwen Biv- 
ouac, No. -1. Franklin. Tenn. Having been placed in 
that position by my comrades, 1 felt that it was my 
duty to gather up relics of the war, so as t<> he ena- 
abled to make reports to the Bivouac. This I did 
mainly from a diary which I kept during my term of 
serviie. Having begun the work of a committeeman 
in this way, I have gone on writing until a prospect- 
ive book is the result, of about o-'<> pages, 12mo, pica 
type. 

xou will not understand me as wishing to put my- 
self before the readers of the Confederate Veteran 
as having accomplished some great feat in military 
literature. I mean to say that something of this sort 
ought to lie the result of the labors of many historical 
committees in our bivouacs. Possibly but few diaries 
have been kept, hut an active committee could gather 
Up many important and interesting war items, both 
among themselves and from others. At every meet- 
ing of the Bivouac a report of some length might to 
he made, and, sooner or later, material for an interest- 
ing and valuable volume of Rebel relies would he at 
hand. And we ought to be in a hurry about this mat- 
ter, for the number of those who can tell of the war 
from personal experience is rapidly lessening, and with 
the death of every old soldier some iirportant facts 
are lost. You have heard many- war incidents told 
which ought to he written down, hut which never 
have. Let the historical committees gather up all 
such that they can, and let them he carefully pre- 
served. It is due to ourselves, to our children, and to 
the South at large, that we do this. 

And in this connection allow me to say that the 
Confederate Veteran is a grand and timely reser- 
voir, so to speak, for tin- deposit of many and a great 

variety of Rebel relics. Already several pieces have 
appeared in it, which must be in a book some day. 
Perhaps the thoughtful and discriminate editor is look- 
ing forward to the publication in hook form, after 
awhile, ot such editorials and communications as 
ought to he thus preserved. It would he rich reading, 
surely. Success to you in your enterprise. It strikes 
me as being the very periodical we have been needing 

fin- a hmg t inn: 

\v vntbd. — To buy, immediately, Confederate Money, Con- 

federate Stamps on original envelopes, old I'nitcd " States 
•Stamps older than 1871', and old CoinH. Describe exactly what 
you have, and address Edward S. Jonks, Garland Avenue, 

Nashville, Tenn. 



Dr. A. .1. Thomas, Medical Superintendent ot' the 
Southern Indiana Hospital for Insane. Evansville, 
hid., under date of March 22, 1893, writ.-: -The 
March number of the Veteran is a good one and I 
hope thai this is simply a forerunner of the excellence 
t" which the journal may attain. Every family in 
the South should subscribe for it. None are too poor 
as t" make poverty an excuse for not subscribing. 
The Smith needs such literature. Our weakness be- 
fori and during tin- war was, I always thought, owing 
to the fact that the North presented their peculiar po- 
litical and social views more largely to their own peo- 
ple and to the world than we did. While able intel- 
lectually to-compete with any ill a literary contest, we 
did in.t feel the necessity of presenting our side of 
the social and political problems, but felt that a just 
and wise jury would render the verdict in their favor. 
Every Southern soldier and every Southern woman 
should feel it a sacred duty to contribute something to 
the literature of tin South. Things that are written 
are not forgotten, but leave an impression that is pro- 
ductive of good." 

it 

In Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, there is an ir- 
regular-shaped, small spot of ground, enclosed with a 
neat iron fence. On the gate is the name "Jefferson 
Davis," and on the marble headstone is engraved: 

JOSEPH, ' 
Son of our Beloved President, 
Jefferson Davis. 

Erected by the Little Girls ami Boys of the Southern Capital. 

It will be recalled by the older people that the lad 
lost his life by falling from a window of the Confed- 
erate "White House" during the war. 

World's Columbian Exposition, 

OPENS MAY l, 1893. 

IF yiiii are going to attend, take the Kvaiisvllle Koul •■ , E. ,v T. II. 
and I'. t v E. I. Kailroadsi, the only line which can otter through 
t ni ii service hetween the South and Chicago, having two trains daily. 

Train No 8, "World's Fair Special." leaves Nashville at T.IK) 
A. H . Evansville at l.io l\ M., anil arrives a! Chicago at Iii.iki r. m.. will 
he the daylight train, and is equipped with elegant Pullman Parlor 
Buffet Cars anil handsome coaches. 

Train No. 8, "• Chicago and *nstivill«* I.imil«»d,"a solid vesti- 
buled train, leaves Nasi.ville at 7.50 e. M., Evansville at 1.4U a. m.. and 
arrives a I Chicago at In. 10 A M. 'I'll is train is equipped with Pullman 
Sleepers and day coaches, and also has an elegant Dining Car, which 

serves meals ell route. 

Round-trip Tickets will he on sale from April 'J'lth to October 31st, 
good returning unlii November ."), 1898. 

For sleeping-car reservation, maps, rates, etc., apply to either of 
the undersigned. 

s. I,. RoOERS, Southern Past. Agent, S. D. McI.kish, '.'. P. and T. A., 
Chattanooga, Tenn. Evansville, Ind. 




CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 
CURE FOR ALCOHOLISM. 



r 57 



.4-Y INSTITUTE FOR THIS FEARFCL DISEASE 
LISHED IN NASHVILLE. 



ESTA Ti- 



lt is with a great deal of pleasure that we announce 
the opening of an Institute in Nashville for the cure 
of Alcoholism, the Morphine ami Tobacco habits. 

The treatment used will be that of Dr. Mark M. 
Thompson, President and Founder of the National 
Bi-chloride of Gold Company, oi Chicago, 111. 

This wonderful cure, which has been successfully 
used forthe past seven years, is unqualifiedly endorsed 
by leading clergymen and the national officers of the 
W. C. T. r. It possesses all the advantages <>t' other 
famous cures, and is in many vital respects superior 
to any other known to science. 

Dr. A. ('. Potter, late house physician of the parent 
institute at Chicago, a physician of many years suc- 
cessful practice and a Christian gentleman of the 
highest order 18 the Medical Director of the Nashville 
Institute. Mr. ('. I.. Frost, well known to many of 
Nashville's husiness men. will aet as lui-mcss manager. 
The>e gentlemen will guarantee an absolute 'lire or 
money refunded. We clip the following from a recent 
address of Hon. John V. Farwell, the famous dry goods 
merchant of Chicago, and none the less famous as a 
Christian philanthropist : 

"I fully believe thai God can and sometimes does 

take away all desire for liquor from a man. and I be- 
lieve just as fully that God has revealed to Dr. Thomp- 
son the scientific cure for drunkenness. Cod will not 
do for a man what the man can do for himself, or what 
others can do for him in a scientific way: and now 
that this LTc.it -. . i.t ha- been thus revealed, drinking 
men are without excuse for continuing in their bond- 
age. 1 consider this Bi-chloride of Gold Cure one of 
the greatest scientific discoveries of the aire'' 

The promoters of the "Nashville Institute. Bichlo- 
ride of Cold Treatment," will cheerfully give consul- 
tation and information, free of charge, to those who 
may he interested. 

Their down-town office is Room 30, Cumberland 
Presbyterian Building, Nashville. Tenn. Write to or 
call on them. 

N. B. — They have a special proposition to make to 
Camps of Confederates. W. C. T. U. and all temper- 
ance societies throughout Tennessee and the South. 



ARE YOU .. 



AFFLICTED WITH 



CATARRH, KRc INCH ITIs. 
ASTH MA. c i IXSI'M PTK IN, 
or any disease of the 
THIMAT AND LUNGS? 

Send for a book of 100 pages, mailed free, describing 
treatment and its proper use in each disease. Treatment 
by inlinlat i< >n. 

Absolute cure and satisfaction guaranteed. 

THE SPECIFIC OXYGEN CO. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 




THE KIMBALL. 

nTLANTA, Q v. Is fortunate In the location of its leading hotel, 
*• "The Kimball," situated, as il is in the very heart of the city. 
surrounded by the busy maris of trade, and In close proximity to the 
Union Depot, where center all the treat line- of railroad, and from 
■ radiate to even pari nt the city the splendid system of elec- 
tric sin ci railways and steam dummy lc es. 

A description of this great hotel, with Its 4>n rooms, and accom- 
modations for 1,000 guests, would be entertalnli ii. 

^Fosters Webb, 

Printers, 
Stationers, 
Binders, 
Blank Books, 

211 CHURCH ST.. 
NASHVILLE TEIMN 

* * 



We make a specialty of prli e Camps and other 

Vetei a □ organisations. 

We have In our possession electros of all Confederate flags, which 
may be printed In colors on stationery, etc. 

The CONrBDKRATl VBTBRAN is printed by our establishment and 
is submitted as a specimen of our work. 



RIVERSIDE MILLS 

Manufacture the following grades of 

CORN MEAL. 

Bolted Meal, Morgan's Matchless Meal, Pearl Meal. 
Also Hominy, Grits, and Graham Flour. All grocers 
handling the product of Riverside Mills are authorized 
to guarantee satisfaction. Ask your grocer for River- 
side Mills Meal, and insist on having it furnished, and 
you will not fail to have good corn bread. 

CALVIN MORGAN, Proprietor. 




IS8 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN'. 



Printing ! Printing ! Printing ! 

GOOD PRINTING! CHEAP PRICES! QUICK WORK! 



WE MAKE SPECIALTIES OF FINE 



Bookwork, Catalogues, Newspaper Work, Pamphlets, Commercial Printing. 

Our facilities are - can be found in the United States. All work executed in the very 

best style at reasonable rates; satisfaction guaranteed. Estimates cheerfully furnished. 



BOOKS ! 



Books! Books! This is an Age of Books! 

The Road to Success Lies Through ©^ "GOOD BOOKS." 



The World and How to Take It SPARKS from A BASKLOS OUR COUNTRY 



BY A. .!. B UBD, 1). D. 

Wnli Introduction and Biographical Sketch 

ol Hi. lamented author by his friend, 

.lull n M. Gaut, Esq. Four hundre-1 pages, 

handsomely bound In cloth, with fuil- 

stei i porl rail "l Dr. Balrd. 

PRICE, $1.50. 

The plan of iliis great book is simple. 
It deals with life us it is. piously, practi- 
cally, and powerfully. l>r. Baird was 
minently a man of affairs. Living 
in the world, he loved it, strove to help 
it. without himself being worldly. In 
this last literary work of hie life he bae 

lefl us a record of his i mon-sense, 

warm-hearted thinking about right iv- 
ing. He wrote as he talked, fervidly, 
strikingly, and every one of the four 
hundred pages of this valuable volume 
sparkles with great ideas, ennobling, 'in- 
structive, right, A child may read it 
understandingly. A sage may study it 
with profit. 



CAMPAIGNS AND BATTLES 



Mteentn Regiment of Tennessee Volunteers, 

nv COL. I BOM 18 A. HEAD. 



Cloth, 488 Pages Price, postpaid, $ 

A carefully and ably prepared sketch 
of thi rendered by the Sixteenth 

Regi it in the late war, with twenty- 
two engra\ ings. 



BY CHANCELLOR NATHAN GREEN, 1. 1.. D. 

rhree hundred pages, neatly bound In cloth, 
beaA \ paper, large clear type. 

PRICE, $1.00. 

" 1 presume to call this little volume 
■ Sparks from a Backlog,' " says the auth- 
or, among other things in his preface, 
" because sparks are snort, detached, dis- 
connected; so are these articles. . ■ The 

backlog is a constituent in every g 1 

wood fire. So the layman is a necessity 
in the church, though he must not I" too 
forward, hut must keep in the rear." 

The quotation will si rve a double pur- 
pose: To indicate the purpose and plan 
of the book, and afford a glimpse of the 

author's simple, chaste style, which has 

made bis writings so popular. 

The I k is a literary mosaic without 

even a show of systematic ai rangement. 
It will he the more interesting on that 

account. It is a book tO.be read " by 

.snatches.' There is consolation in it for 
the hour of grief and gloom; there is 
encouragement for the moment of de- 
spondency; there is strengthening for 
the weak, and warning for the boastful 
strong. A word is there for everybody 
in every condition. A delightful com- 
mingling of story ami essay, lay preach- 
ing and human philosophy, the serious 

and the gay, Wit and wisdom. It is one- 
sided in but a single respect that is, it 
is wholly pure. 

I he hook is a collection of Chancellor 

', Men's best practical papers, treating a 

multitude of the phases of every day life 
and eveiy-day duty. 



ITS POSSIBLE FUTURE and 
ITS PRESENT CRISIS. 

BY I1KV. losiAII STRONG, I). !>., 

General Secretary qf tht Evangelical Alliance 

for tht I 'mi, ,i States, Wsui I 

Cumberland Presbyterian edition, with an 
[ntroductlon by Rev. C. II. Bell, n D., 
President of the Cumberland Presbyte- 
rian Board of Missions, ijiiin., l'sii pages, 
cloth, 

PRICE, 60 Cents. 

More than HO, 00(1 copies of this valu- 
able volume have been sold. It is the 
best handbook of general information 
about " Our Country " ever published. 



First Battles and How to Fight Tliem. 

BY FREDERICK A. ATKINS. 

12mo., Cloth. Price, 50 Cents. 

Some friendly chats with young men. 
Contents: Money and Morals, Shams, 

The Philosophy of Pleasure, What is a 

Gentleman, The Last Christ, Christ and 
Commerce, About Holidays, How to be 
I nsignificant. 



MORAL MUSCLE AND HOW TO USE IT 

BY FREDERICK V. ATKINS, 

12mo., Cloth. Price, 50 Cents. 

A brotherly chat with young men. 
" It looks the fads of young men's lives 
full in the face, and proclaims the gospel 
of industry, perseverance, self control, 

and manly Christianity." 



!SEXI> FOR CC>]\Il 3 L.K r rjH: CATALOGUE. 

WE ARE PREPARED TO FURNISH ANY BOOK PUBLISHED AT PUBLISHERS PRICES. 



The Cumberland Presbyterian Publishing House, 



nashvixjIjS, TiE3:N":i>a\ 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



159 



NASHVILLE HEALING INSTITUTE 



All Chronic Cases 

... A Specialty ... 



tits" ( 'u res Rheumatism, 1 fetarrh, Neuralgia, < Ipium ;md Whisky llat.iis. and many other 
diseases. We also give Elect ro-Therapeutic Hut li>. 

Rooms 18, 20 and 22 Fish Building, 230-232 N. .Summer St. 

Take Elevator. ap-lyr 




E. W. AVEREXL, 
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215' Union St . up stairs. 
NASHVILLE, tins 

W. Averell is :, 

membei in rood standing <>r Cheatham Biv- 
ouac, I'.c. v., T. I'. .In... P. Hickm in. 
mar-lyr "Seen tmv." 



WHARTON & CO. 

DRUGGISTS AND CHEMISTS. 

WHARTON'S NATIONAL WRITING FLUID. 




ind bankt re. also for all pi 1 
\ gal to-tannatc ..f Iron. 



For 1 kkeepers 

.H.I 

Used and recommcuded by Phillips, Bailey & Co 

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1 Hill Enkln; Safe 1 >.|.. .-1 1 Co.; Hart a Henslej ; Kirk- 
pat 1 Ick a- 1 .... and hundreds ..f oil 

TO SCHOOLS AND BUSINESS MEN. 



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Two OU1 

ounce. 
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One qi 
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Sil 10 
20 



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WHASTON'S SUPERIOR COLOGNE. $1 A PINT. 

Vine and Church Sts.. NASHVILLE, TENN 



S. A. LINK, A. M. 

will, 1 \ KB ' H \ K«.l "i THB 

TENNESSEE FEMALE COLLEGE, 

FRANKLIN, TENN. 

For the next school year, and will be assisted by a competent faculty. 
WRITE TO HIM BEFORE SELECTING A SCHOOL. 

Will be in Nashville, Term., until July I, 1893. 
After that date at Franklin, Tenn. 



BETTER THAN GOLD! 

A CLEAR, HEALTHFUL COMPLEXION! 
Mme. A. RUPPERT'S FACE BLEACH. 

Its wonderful effeet is 
known in almost every 

house hold. Thousand's 
who had diseases and dis- 
coloration of theektn (in- 
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ne88,p1mplee,blackheBd8, 
olllness, ric ) have had 
theirheartsgiaddencd by 

1 1 > use. 

IT IS ABSOLUTE- 
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prominent phyalclane 
recommend it. It does 

not drive the Impurities 
In, but draws them out. 
I( fa not n cosn 

■ un, but a cure. 
M ITS PRICE IS 
"*»• »^*t REASON ABLE. 

,™ aBC «™nfi?w'ono bottle. which 

costs *•> is often sufficient to euro; or three hot I les. usually 

required, $5. lYepanitionNsent, securely packed in a plain 
wrapt er. Mme. Jiuppert'e book "How to be BetmUfuL" 
Bent for 6 cents. Mux. A. Kuppxbt, 

FOR SALE BY C. R. BADOUX, 

Also dealer In Hair ami Fancy II Is, 

226 North Summer Street, Nashville, Tenn. 





To write I..' 

athomed 
moments. I lur new 

bOOk, ".'1 I I i.MM.lN- 

si \s, I ESSONK,"Will 

teach you. P 
If not pleased, return ii and gel your 
money. Endorsed by all the leading pen- 
men. Descriptlvecirculars and te 

Address W. T. Parks. Principal of 
Southern College of Pen Art, Nashville, Tenn. 
Mention this paper. ma-3t 



All Kinds of Brushes to Order. 



Nashville Brush Factory, 

p. i; l,i: ANON, l'K< IPHJ ! 

COTTON MOPS, DUSTERS AND WHISKS. 

BROOMCORN BROOMS. 
112 South Market Street, NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Confederate Veteran, 50 Cents a Year. 



POSITIONS GUARANTEED, 

If you will take full course in 
DRAUCHONS 

Consolidated Practical Business College, 

Nashville, l'l nn, Soi inter now. 

Send ! - ,i. F. Draui 

President. 



UMBRELLAS, PARASOLS AND CANES. 

First-class Recovering and Repairing 
LACE .COVERS . FOR . PARASOLS. 

i \ n LND STORE, 

222 North Summer Street. Nashville, Tenn. 
R. BORGNTS & CO. 

H S. HAILEY, 

WHOLESALE 

FRUITS AND NUTS, 

119 N. Market St., Nashville. Tenn. 

Telephone loK'2. 
Cleveland Says, 

Smoke "Baby Ruth," 

The Noted Five-Cent Cigar. 

1 i: \ Dl -i l I'll ED in 

SIDNEY HENLEIN& CO., Nashville, Tenn. 



JONAS TAYLOR, 



ft 9 



J- 







to 



Horse Shoeing of all kinds Neatly Done. 

s. 

Dr. Roberg's Patent Hoof Expander, 

For tin- cure and preventl >f Contraction, 

Quarter i 'racks, i lorne 



Finest Sta tlonery 

—at— 

Wheeler 

Publishing Company 's, 

NASHVILLE, TE.XN. 



Any hunk in print sent on receipt ol (he 
publisher's price. 



MAIL ORDERS SOLICIl'ED. 



i6o 

W. C. < OUJEB, President. 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



POPE TAYLOR, Vice President. 



II. Lulls sl'KKHY. Secretary and Treasurer 



AUTHORIZED CAPITAL, $100,000. 

W. C. Collier Grocery Company, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

FINE IMPORTED AUD DOMESTIC GROCERIES. 

Nos. 601 and 603 Church Street, NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Rangum 

Root 

Liniment 

Is the 

Best 

In the 

World 

It will Cure 

A Man 

or his kind more certainly and more 
rapidly than any other Liniment on 
earth, of Rheumatism, Pains, Swell- 
ings, Bruises, Sprains, Soreness, 
Stiffness, Sore Throat or Chest, Pain 
in Hack and Joints, Corns, Warts 
and Bunions, InsectB^tesand Stings, 
Frostbite, Cramps, Aches, Cuts and 
Wounds. It will as surely cure 

A Horse 

or his kind of Spavin, Splint, Ring- 
bone, Windgalls, Puffs, Swin- 
ey, Scratches, Swellings, Bruises, 
Sprains, Hurts, Cuts. Wounds, Sore- 
ness, Stiffness, Knots, Harness and 
Saddle Hurts. 
SPURLOCK, NEAL & CO.. Nashville, Terr 

MISS L. A. WHEELER, 

MASSAGE - TREATMENT, 

Rooms 17, 19 and 21, Fish Block, 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



coto.. VOGEL'S 

ros 

FINE TAILORING. 

233 North Summer Street. 

Nashville. Tenn. 

LINCK'S LAUNDRY 



DOES THE 
BEST WORK. 



LOOK 



NEVER-FAILING 
PILE OINTMENT 



Bleeding, 



Electric and Hot Air Batbs, etc. 
Sea Salt with Massage. 
Hours from 2 p. M. to 6 P. M. 



H ERE! 



WALTER WINSTEAD, 



DEALER IN 



Fine Boots and Shoes, 

508 Church St., Nashville, Tenn. 

ap-6m 

PENSIONS 

ARK GRANTED TO 

Officers and Soldiers of the Indian Wars of 
1832 to 1842, 

or their surviving widows. Confederate Army 
Service i* no bar, 

Charles & William H. King, 
ma-3t 918 B - St., Washington, D. C. 




W. S. FINLY, 703 Church St., Nashville, Tenn. 

Makes the above offer to the readers of Tiik 
Veteran, ami proposes to deliver the watch 
mi receipt of Ural payment. Kvry watch 
guaranteed. Call and see him, or write to 
him. ap-6m 

E. M. FORBS & CO. 

Tin and Slate Roofing, Glittering, Piping, &c. 

Tin Roofs Repaired and Painted. 
Galvanized iron Gutter and Pipe. 

37 Bridie Ave. (ap-6m) Nashville. Tenn. 
Latest and Best 

BECKWITH&CO'S. 



Thermo Ozone Battery. 




The most powerful and the cheapest device 

for treatment anil run' of diseases by elec- 
tricity. Mum iti.Mu, folds. Neuralgia, In- 
somnia, and many other ailments attributed 
to impure or Impoverished blood. Indispen- 
slble to overworked students and profes- 
sional men, who are thus assured of a peace- 
ful night's rest. Always ready. Price, $10.00. 
Try it. Satisfaction guaranteed, or money 
refunded within thirty days. 
Write for information to 

GILLESPIE & STONES, General Agents, 

111 South Market Street, 
212 North Summer Street, 
Nashville, Tenn. 



There never was a better Beer brewed, and never before has any 
Beer obtained such a reputation in so short a time, as 



Established 1867. 



NASHVILLE BEER! 



FRANK ANDERSON & CO., 



The proof, of course, is 
in the drinking. Try it. 
Convince yourself. 



THE WM. GERST BREWING CO. 

GIVE US YOUR PATRONAGE. NASHVILLE, TENN. 



WHOLESALE 



Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 

2(M MARKET SQUARE, 



NASHVILLE, TENN. 
(15) 



J. S. OWEN & CO. 




CIRCULAR DISTRIBUTING AND 
MAILING AGENTS. 



Work done thoroughly and with despatch. 
Best K' F< i' net s. 



230 NORTH SUMMER STREET, 

i;. joms s \m> li'. 

NASHVILLE. TENN 
Telephone 9B4. mar-lyr 

BARBER .si/op AND BATH ROOMS. 



C. BREVER. 

Russian and Turkish Baths 

FOR GENTLEMEN ONLY. 



No. 317 Church Street. Nashville. Tenn. 



HOW ABIU'T 111 AT NEW 



^^PIANO OR ORGAN? 

YOU HAVE BEEN PROMISING tT TO YOUR 
DAUGHTER FOR A LONG TIME. 

We Have What She Wants, and We Sell Reasonably. 



ROBERT L. LOUD, 

212 NORTH SUMMER STREET. NASHVILLE. TENN. 



THE NASHVILLE AMERICAN. 



This old, '>iil paper, published :ii Its State Capital, has 
been the utterance oi the Democratic party In Tennes- 
see for generations-. 

ITS GREETING TO THE CONFEDERATE VETERAN 

Was typical of its nature, and it Immediately enlisted 
to strve it to the utmost. 



The Weekly American and the Confederate Veteran, both One Year 
for 81, the price of the American alone. 



WEST. JOHNSTON & CO.. RICHMOND. VA.. 
Publishers. Booksellers, and Stationers. 



THE rr BLISB I RS 0] 

'"Greg's History of the United States," 

with Introduction bj Gen. Wade Hampton. 
The "n\\ true bis tor j of the late Civil War 
i bal has ever been publ Ished. 

Cloth, 52.50: Lea N 

"The Bubject Ih treated In a masterlj man- 
ner. It t'<:trs noble testimony to the devo- 
tion, the patriotism, and the heroism ol the 
cii Izens of i he South. 1 *— i 

"I have advertised the book by prals 
everywhere ever since I read it." Gen. wtn. 
If. f'r 

i Agents for Virginia and North Ca i 
for the Hammond Typewriters. All type- 
writer supplies, i I7i 



WANTED. 

BOOK-KEEPERS, Clerks, Stenographers, 
Cashiers, Drummers, Teachers, Median- 
108; housekeepers, ailroad Men, Servants, 
and all persons desiring employment of any 
kind in any of t ht- Southern or Southwestern 
Btates, address, with stamp, 

NASH VILLI-; EMPLOYMENT BUREAU, 
mar-lyr Nashville, Tenn. 



JESSE ELY. 

HATS & MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS, 

Agent lor the Celebrated Knox Hats. 

204 North Cherry Street, Nashville, Tenn. 



W 



OPPOSITE MAXWELL BOUSE. 



M. STRUBE & CO. 

TELEPHONE 579. 

No 607 LINE STREET 

NASHVILLE. TENN 



Wire s Screens 

FOR DOORS AND WINDOWS 
MADE TO ORDER. 



UPHOLSTERING, VARNISHING. 

FURNITURE REPAIRING OF ALL KINDS. 



B.H.STIEF JEWELRY COMPANY 

THE LEADING JEWELRY HOUSE OF THE SOUTHWEST 

CARRY THE LARGEST, CHOICEST AND BEST STOCK OF 

Watches, Jewelry *• 



• * 



Solid Silver, Diamonds 

.„,, Elegant Gift Gooos 



TO BE FOUND IN THE SOUTH. 
THIS COMPANY MAKES A SPECIALTY OF THE FURNISHING OF 

FINE GOLD MEDALS and BADGES 

to be used as prizes or honorary distinctions by Schools, Colleges and Societies. 
NOVEL and ORIGINAL DESIGNS furnished and estimates given. CORRESPONDENCE IN^'ITEP. 

JAMES B. CARR, Manager. 



INSURE YOUR LIFE 



New York Life Insurance Company. 



YOU DO NOT HAVE TO "DIE TO WIN." 



The New York Life Insurance Company is nearly 50 years old. 

It- assets are over $135,000,000. 

Its policies are perfectly free from all restrictions. 

Its new Accumulation Policy is so plain a child can 

understand it. 
If you should die, the amount of the policy is payable at nine 

to your wife and children. 
If you should I"- living ten, fifteen, or twenty years from the 

time of insuring, you get the money yourself. 
If you stop paying from any reason, you do not lose what you 

had paid. 
If you need money, you can borrow from the C pany, and 

will !»■ charged only five percent interest. 

WSITE FOR RATES, ETC., OR CALL ON 

J. W. JACKSON, Agency Director, 

327J Union Street, Nashville, Tenn. 



for FIRST CLASS .-."J 



Artistic Work 



CALL ON 



OTTO B. 



GIERS, 



PHOTOGRAPHER, 

No. 318 UNION STREET, NASHVILLE, TENN. 



*« g» "u ^ 



Qd 9 fed e ra tf® l/e te ra 9 . 

Published Monthly m the Interest of Confederate Veterans and Kindred Topics. 



Price 5 Cents. i \j i t 
Yearly 50 Cents. I v ul - ± - 



Nashville, Tenn., June, 1S93. 



V f. IS. A.lTNNIM.Il.VM, 

inu. u. , Editor and Mai 





• 


1 


• 


1 




> 


v mi . jp» 1 

fife 



if^- 








•'Twill live in song and story, 
Tbougb iis f..uis are in the dust. 




$&*w 






v<- - 



MRS. MAGGIE DAVIS HAYES, 

The elder of Jefferson and Varina Howell Davis' 
two daughters, was born in Washington, D. C 
during the latter part of her father's term as 
Secretary of War. She remembers much of the 
trials of her father during the Confederate strug- 
gle. While Mr. Davis was in prison, Maggie was 
with her maternal grandmother, near Montreal, 
Canada, and attended school at the Convent of 
the Sacred Heart. After Mr. Davis' release, and 
while he was with his family in England, this 
daughter was put at another Catholic school In 
London, where she completed her collegiate 
course. In her girlhood she was delightful com- 
panionship to her father, who called her " Little 
Polly," and she is exceedingly like him In ap- 
pearance, voice and manner. 

See additional sketch wil hln.l 



«f 



i 



WILLIE DAVIS HAYES. " I AM A CONFEGORATE. 



i£S3 :e=: 



The Nashville Shorthand Institute 

and Tennessee Business College. 
The Leading, The Oldest, and The Best. 

main floor, Baxter court, nashville, tenn. 

TELEPHONE 1466. 



charles mitchell, 
Baker and Confectioner. 

Orders for Weddings ard Parties Promptly Fi'led. 
Homemade Candles Fresh Oally. 323 Unkn St.eet. Nash,ille. Tenn. 



THE HOS1 PBA( MCAL AND THOROUGHLY SYSTEMATIC 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

SHORTHAND, typewriting, bookkeeping, 

penmanship and telegraphy. 

Day and Nigbl Classes nil the year. Hours from B \. m to 10 P. m. 
Headquarters for all kinds of Shorthand and Typewriter work. 
Reas<»n;ii>i<' rates and entire satisfaction guaranteed, 

ALEXANDER FALL, President. 

Main Floor, Baxter Court. Telephone 1466. 

mail* 'I "a application. 



OX TO Jill: WORLD'S FAIR! 

if Mm are going, communicate "' once with the World's 
Columbian Exposition Bureau, of Nashville, I'enn. This 
Bureau can make your visit more pleasant, profitable, nnd 

ec >mical. Ii is noi local. 3astbe support ol ;( numberof 

Nashville's leading citizens. Pamphlets giving particulars 
on application. Address, K. K. Harris, 

Secretary and Manager, in Union Street, Nashville, Tenn. 



JAMES T. CA.3>vd:r, 

BOOK AND JOB PRINTER 



COUNTY AND CIVIL WORK A SPECIALTY. 



Orders by mail carefully executed. Writ.' for estimates. 

No :i: Union Street, Nashville, Tenn. 




165 



BUSINESS GOLLEGE 



Second Floor. Cole Building, 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



l>*-,r' The Most Practical Institution of its kind in the World. 
Indorsed by Merchants and Bankers. [9) Write for Catalogue. 



SOUTHERN SHORTHAND ACADEMY EMPLOYMENT BUREAU, 

426!; UNION STREET, NASHVILLE, TENN. 

The oolln I i South devoted exclusively to the training of young ladles and gentlemen in Shorthand and Typewriting. The 

Acadi n. e pei mal direction or ;. veteran teacher and reporter a veteran in a double sense, bav ng commenced the study of 

phonograph; us ago, while a prisoner of war in Rock Island, Illinois. 

StcUTClaxd SyStGm TctUEfht. Bend for handsome Souvenir Catalogue, containing much valuable information about short- 
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NASHVILLE, TENKT. 



Confederate Veteran. 

Published Monthly in the Interest of Confederate Veterans and Kindred Topics. 



Price, 5 Cents. 
Yearly, SO Cents, 



Vol. I. 



Nashville, Tenn., June, 1893. 



"NTr\ A fS. A. CUNNINGHAM, 
1NU. <J. \ Editor and Manager. 



Entered at the Postofnce, Nashville, Tenn.. as second-class matter. 

Special club rates to the Press and to Camps— 36 copies $10. 

An extra copy sent to each person who sends si \ subscriptions. 

Advertisements: One dollar per inch one time, or sin M year, ex- 
cept la>t page; $25 a page. Discount: Half year, one-Issue; one 
year, one issue. 



The picture of Mrs. Joel Addison Hayes, on cover 
page, will give pleasure to veterans. Strange as it 
may seem, many people had lust sight of her. This 
occurred through so much having been written about 
the very popular "Daughter of the Confederacy," 
while Mrs. Hayes, who married very young, has been 
largely occupied with family cares. 

Mr. Hayes belongs to one of Nashville's oldest and 
wealthiest families, although he was horn in Holly 
Springs, Miss., and was never much in Nashville. 
Two important streets. Addison and Hayes, are named 
for his family. He became a banker in Memphis at a 
very early age, and was successful from the beginning, 
but while on a trip in Mr. Davis' interest he took a 
severe cold which so affected his lungs that a change 
of climate became necessary, and he has for several 
years engaged in banking at Colorado Springs, Col., 
where he has been even more successful than at Mem- 
phis. In darker hours of adversity than the Southern 
people have knowledge, to Mr. Davis' family this B on- 
in-law , ever ardently devoted, has been the strong arm 
of support. The tirst child of this union, named Jef- 
ferson Davis, died. There are four living, two daugh- 
ters, named for their grandmothers, Varina Howell 
and Lucy White: the son. whose name has been 
changed by the Mississippi Legislature to Jefferson 
Hayes Davis, and little " Billie," the youngest grand- 
child, whose picture appears by the side of his mother, 
and who proudly claims to be "a Confegorate." The 
picture of Mrs. Hayes is an excellent likeness. While 
returning from Hollywood on burial day 1 happened 
near the carriage containing Mrs. Davis, Gov. McKin- 
nev. and Mr. ami Mrs. Hayes, and although well ac- 
quainted with both for years, I made the mistake to 
greet the latter as "Miss Winnie." A lady devoted to 
Mrs. Hayes, and who knows her intimately, said this: 

" Richly gifted by nature in all line qualities of mind 
and person, she reigns a social queen — that high type 
of well-bred women that has made our Southern land 
so famous. Not alone in the social world, however, 
does she please ami charm by her fascinating womanly 
qualities, hut in her home life, where the wife and 
mother adorns and beautifies her character. Unself- 
ish, tender, and loving, she guards well the happiness 
intrusted to her keeping." 



A Virginia lady who was guest of the Governor, in 
sending a list of subscribers, hut withholds her name 
from the public, wrote: 

" I was awakened at three o'clock at night by the 
hand playing a solemn dirge. Leaning from the win- 
dow, which overlooked the eapito] grounds, I saw 
what appeared to he a dark line ot Confederate sol- 
diers. The body of our dear old President was being 
home reverently between them and up the steps of the 
Capitol. The whole scene was bathed in moonlight. 
The war was so vividly recalled to my mind that I 
laid my head on the window sill and wept. Such a 
Scene of sadness and desolation came over me that for 
a time 1 was almost overwhelmed. The great gather- 
ing of our clan, and the honor showed our sacred dead, 
must ever he a satisfaction to us older Confederates." 



It is a coincidence that after 1 had put in type the 
reference to John Howard Payne on editorial page 
there should come from my ever faithful friend, Char- 
ley Herbst, of Macon, tin' following clipping from the 
Davis Memorial Services in Montgomery: 

"There was an incident connected with the Davis 
exercises here on the '_'<'th ult. thai the newspapers 
neglected to mention." said a lady yesterday, "and it 
was one of the most pathetic things of the entire .lay. 
•lust as tin. casket was lowered from the catafalque 
and was started up the steps of the capitol, the hand 
played ' Home. Sweet Home,' and it moved the people 
to tears. There was not :( dry eye anywhere around 
where 1 was standing. The old hero, though dead, 
was at home at the first capital of the Confederacy, 
and lived in the heart and memory of every Alabam- 
ian. He was ,.,t home in Alabama, and 1 have felt all 
along that here his body ought to have rested ; hut 
his family have decreed otherwise, and I trust that he 
may rest well." 

TEN THOUSAND COPIES FOR JULY. 



An effort will be made to send out for July the best 
issue of the Confederate Veteran. A supplement 
is promised, as an inset, the four Hags as published on 
front of March number. The 10,000 copies will fur- 
nish a good supply for the Birmingham meeting of 
United Confederate Veterans and for specimen copies 
to many whose friends would be glad to have them 
see copies. Patrons who first write requests for 
copies to he mailed will be supplied whether the edi- 
tion is sufficient or not. All former editions have 
been exhausted. There are being printed of this 
number 6,000 copies. Advertisers cannot procure a. 
Letter medium in the South. See the low rates. 



l62 



CONFEDERATE VETERAN. 



All editions exhausted. There has not been a 
ad of the < oni i derate Veteran since the 
publication started in January. 



VNIFORM WITlIiilT fOVSTERslOX. 



ONDENCE is delayed painfully. At a sil 
more than a hundred communications have claimed 
attention, and gratitudi has urged prompt attention 
that it has been impossible to give. 



Several friends, anxious that the Veteran he 
accurate in every statement, have kindly given notice 
of error in our list of Lieutenant Generals killed in 
battle. Tli. omission is that of A. 1'. Hill, ami Dr. J. 
Win. Jones, in his constant zeal for our cause, ami the 
ran too, has supplied a thrilling sketch, which 
may he expected in the July isMic. 



'I'm- issue of the Veteran goes t" press without 
eei-tain articli ested by recent events. One of 

these i.- a patriotic appeal to cur fellow-citizens at the 
North, suggested by a recent visit to the national 
capital ami to "Arlington," this side of the Potomac. 

A zealous eflforl will he made in the next issue of the 

Veteran t<> have outsiders see us as we see each 
other, in tin- hope that greal g 1 will be accomplished. 

The widow of Gen. \V. T. Hillyer writes from her 
home, East Orange, X. ■!.. <>( an interesting article by 
-Mrs. \V. II. Cherry, of Nashville, copied from the CON- 
FEDERATE Vi M i, w intothe New York Observer. Gen- 
eral Hillyer was on General Grant's staff at Savannah 
ami Shiloh. The good woman kindly considers send- 
ing some war reminiscences to the Veteran. Her 
husband was of General Grant's original start', and 
remained with him until after the fall of Vicksburg. 



Tins beautiful tribute was paid to the mory of 

Col. John McGavock, of Franklin, at his funeral, by 
Col. Thos. Claiborne, of the Frank Cheatham Bivouac: 

"There i-^ i eed of tear- over this gentleman and 

patriot whom we are now burying. A life of four 
-mi,, year- -pent righl here among you is so well 
rounded out that nothing is wanting to his reputation. 
Nut one of your citizens can say he ever robbed the 
widow or orphan or gave evil advice. Never will it he 
forgotten that he took the wounded of that carnage 
over there (pointing to the battle-field) into that very 

room from which we have home his corpse, and with 

infinite tenderness provided for them, and (pointing 
to the graves of the heroic dead i gave that resting 
place to the gallant dead, whose graves have been 

watched by him for nearly thirty years. Old Charon 
waves a plea-ant good-bye as he pushes his boat out 
into the misty night, and we with < 'hri-tian faith he- 
hold him landing where white arm- stretch to receive 
im among t he great throng." 



A friend writes confidentially, heme his name and 
place are withheld: "I hail the,' I wish thee God- 
speed! I hold thee as a brother. Hope that I am not 
a meddler. 1 may he mistaken, hut you must not he. 
I write not for publication. Still less is it intended 
to do harm to any one. It is designed to aid you. ami 
through yon to serve the truth of history and the 
cause of our beloved Southland. 

"I am reliably informed that the Confederal* War 

Journal is backed by the money of Mrs. Frank Leslie, 

of New York. Its traveling representative claim- to 

he an unreconstructed rebel and not to know that the 

ate • ditor is a Republican. 

■'I am not satisfied, and fear that the thing i- an 
enemy in disguise. It hasn't our countersign, yet 
wear- our uniform. It wants our money, no matter 
what it thinks or how it speaks of our cause. Withal 
it is inferior. It seems to have set it> sails to catch 
every wind that blows. A Confed. and a Republican 
editor! New York and Lexington ! What next? 

"Comrade, can't you uncover and show up this